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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 17 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., Closing operations in the Gulf and western rivers. (search)
farther advance impossible Read ran her ashore and burnt her. On the 3d of June Lieutenant-Commander W. E. Fitzhugh received the surrender of Lieutenant J. H. Carter and the Confederate naval forces under his command in the Red River. On the west Gulf coast the blockade continued until the end, several important cutting-out expeditions occurring during January and February. Among these the most noteworthy were the capture of the Delphina, January 22d, in Calcasieu River, by Lieutenant-Commander R. W. Meade; of the Pet and the Anna Sophia, February 7th, at Galveston, by an expedition organized by Commander J. R. M. Mullany; and of the Anna Dale, February 18th, at Pass Cavallo, by a party sent in by Lieutenant-Commander Henry Erben. After the surrender of Mobile, Admiral Thatcher turned his attention to the coast of Texas, and on May 25th Sabine Pass was evacuated. On the 2d of June Galveston surrendered, and the war on the Texas coast came to an end. The Levee at Nashville, lo
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
schooner C. P. Williams, Acting-Master S. N. Freeman, were attacked by Confederate batteries in Stono River. Lieutenant-Commander Meade reports that on December 25th the enemy opened fire on the Marblehead, at 6 o'clock in the morning, from two bahad steam on the port boiler only. The gun-boat returned the enemy's fire vigorously, and, slipping his cable, Lieutenant-Commander Meade took a position nearer the batteries, and after a short encounter caused them to retreat in disorder, leaving t vessels kept up such a fire that the enemy fled precipitately. Commander Balch speaks in the highest terms of Lieutenant-Commander Meade's coolness and bravery, the management of his vessel, and the remarkable rapidity of his fire. On the conclu credit due the different vessels, which ought not to have been the case where all did so well. In addition to Lieutenant Commander Meade's gallantry in the action, he made a reconnoissance of the ground abandoned by the enemy, and then, by directio
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
d her anchor carried out; but as the norther caused the water to fall rapidly, leaving in an hour only about a foot of water alongside, the efforts to float her were unavailing. The launch grounded in the meantime, and it was deemed best not to expose the men to an attack from an overwhelming force. The schooner was therefore set on fire and the expedition returned to the Chocura. Acting-Ensigns Tracy and Beardsley accompanied Lieutenant-Commander (now Captain) R. W. Meade. Lieutenant-Commander Meade. The officers and men behaved as all men will when they are led by a judicious and gallant commander. They were not altogether unfortunate in not receiving some prize-money. Eighty bales of cotton were thrown overboard before they set fire to the schooner; this drifted out to sea, and thirty bales were picked up on the following morning, and very likely more were secured later. This was hard on the shippers; but such are the fortunes of war, and it was the only way to cripple th
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), The blockade (search)
July 18th. Of her seven guns, two were 50-pounder rifles and one a 100-pounder, which made her a very efficient blockader. The trim little gunboat Marblehead (shown below), rating something over five hundred tons, was active throughout the war. In April, 1862, under the command of Lieutenant S. Nicholson, she was in the Chesapeake aiding McClellan in his operations before Yorktown. In February, 1863, she joined the blockading squadron, and under Lieutenant-Commanders R. W. Scott and R. W. Meade, Jr., she participated in the operations in the vicinity of Charleston, supporting the movements up the Stono River and the attacks on Morris Island. The Paul Jones The trim gunboat Marblehead beyond belief were made by the owners of these vessels which were mostly built in Great Britain and were the fastest steaming craft of their day. They were loaded with arms, ammunition, and other supplies needed by the Confederacy, and departed on the return voyage loaded down to their gunwal
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
s study on shore spent two years on the sloop-of-war Portsmouth, and was detached at the Sandwich islands early in 1853 and assigned to the St. Lawrence, a 60-gun frigate, the flagship of the Pacific squadron, in which he cruised until 1855, when he returned to Annapolis for examination and promotion. He graduated in June, 1856, standing sixth in a class of twenty-five, among whom were the following: Rear Admirals W. G. Walker (retired), F. M. Ramsay (retired), W. A. Kirkland (deceased), R. W. Meade (deceased), W. A. Beardsley (retired), and C. C. Carpenter (retired). Upon his graduation as passed midshipman, he was assigned to the St. Lawrence and ordered to the Brazil station. In February, 1857, he was ordered to report to the United States steamer Hetzel for coast survey work on the North Carolina coast, Chesapeake Bay, York and James river, and was so employed until the fall of the same year when he resigned and returned to Columbia, S. C. He was married there, in 1857, to Julia
aker, L. C., IV., 200, 202, 329; VIII., 200, 282. Baker, L. S., X., 281. Baker's Creek, Miss., I., 191. Balaklava, Crimea, Russia, II., 81. Baldwin, B. G., V., 170. Baldwin, W. E., X., 275. Baldy, horse of Gen'l Meade, IV., 295, 312. Ballantyne, W., VII., 17. Balloon Bryan, VIII., 371. Balloon constitution, Fair Oaks, Va. , VIII., 375; 380. Balloon Intrepid, Fair Oaks, Va. , VIII., 375, 378 seq., 379. Balloon Washington, Mechanicsvy Dantzler, Va.: I., 119; III., 93; 97; V., 243; VI., 131, 145, 315. Battery Gregg, S. C., IX., 51. Battery Hays, S. C., V., 112. Battery McAloon, Tenn., II., 295. Battery Magruder, Yorktown, Va. , V., 179. Battery Meade, S. C., Parrott's guns in, V., 115. Battery number 1, Yorktown, Va. , VIII., 317. Battery number 4, Va., I., 252. Battery Powell, Corinth, Miss. , II., 154. Battery Reno, S. C., V., 112. Battery Reynolds, S. C., V
II., 21, 25, 27; VII., 245; railroad bridge across, IV., 118, 119. Cedar Springs, Va., III., 338. Cemetery Hill, Gettysburg, Pa. : III., 202; IV., 234; V., 40; VIII., 122. Cemetery Ridge, Gettysburg, Pa. : I., 73; II., 231, 260; Meade's headquarters at, II., 261; IV., 236. Censorship: of newspapers, VIII., 270; of telegraph lines, VIII., 346. Centralia, Mo., III., 332. Centreville, La., II., 332. Centreville, Va.: I., 149, 150, 162, 163 seq.; ConfederateLanding, Tenn., I., 200, seq., 206. Cub Run, Va., II., 45; V., 20 seq. Culbertson's Art., Confederate, I., 356. Cullmann, F., quoted, X., 124. Cullum, G. W., VII., 330. Culpeper, Va.: I., 39; II., 39, 57, 228, 344; Meade's headquarters at, II., 345; streets of, III., 31; IV., 101; V., 34 seq.; mansion of J. M. Botts, VII., 195 seq.; John M. Botts and family, VII., 197; VIII., 124. Culpeper Court House, Culpeper, Va. : II., 16, 21, 26, 28, 229; III., 17, 28,
ittle Round Top, II., 251, 253; Valley of Death, II., 254, 255; Union and Confederate losses after second day's fighting at, II, 256; Little Round Top, II., 258; gate to cemetery at, II., 259; Cemetery Ridge, II., 260; Little Round Top, II., 260; Meade's headquarters at, II., 261, 267, 270, 272, 294, 340; III., 28: IV., 32, 45, 50, 84, 88; horses killed at, IV., 103, 197; cavalry scouts at White's house, IV., 201, 218, 230. 232, 235; light artillery in, V., 39; Pennsylvania batteries at, V., 40 178 seq., 179, 181 seq., 194, 198 seq., 200 seq., 203, 205, 212, 245, 248, 360, 365; II., 11, 142, 183, 188, 193, 198, 199, 203, 205, 226, 234, 264; at Thomas' headquarters, 1863, II., 290 seq., 296, 318, 321, 340,. 345; III., 13, 14, 22, 26; at Meade's headquarters, Brandy Station, Va., III., 29; I propose to fight it out on this line if it takes all summer! III., 33, 45, 46, 52, 53, 59, 60, 62, 68, 70, 77, 78, 80, 84, 87, 88, 89, 92, 94, 104, 106, 134, 138, 140, 142, 150, 151, 188, 194, 197
II., 261; army of, after crossing Potomac, II., 267; headquarters at Culpeper, Va., 345; III., 15, 28; headquarters at Brandy Station, Va., III., 29, 30, 31, 32, 34, 46, 53, 55, 58, 68, 81, 82, 84, 88, 190, 294, 318, 320, 322, 324, 346; IV., 43, 92, 122, 203, 274, 312; V., 240, 246; VI., 317; at Gettysburg, Pa., VIII., 36; march to Petersburg, Va., VIII., 50, 95, 98, 204, 232, 234, 246, 327, 338, 345, 350, 357, 366, 368; IX., 235, 331; X., 168, 169. Meade, G., Jr. VIII., 192. Meade, R. W., Jr. VI., 121. Meadow bridge, Va.: I., 315, 322; IV., 126. Meagher, T. F.: I., 330; II., 69; Irish brigade, II., 92, 93, 324; X., 125. Mechanics: recruits, VIII., 187. Mechanicsville, Va.: bridge at, I., 315 seq., 319, 320, 322, 343, 361, 366; III., 84; IV., 223 seq.; V., 21, 30 seq., 32, 33, 149, 230; losses at, X., 142. Medical officers: VII., 216; army, multiplicity of important duties of, VII., 224; number of, in war, and achievements of, VII., 226; Federa
0. Posey, C., X., 153. Post, P. S., X., 201. Post office of the Army of the Potomac Viii., 33, 35. Posts, G. A. R., origin of, X., 290. Potato-digging by Grant's men, VIII, 198-199. Potosi, Mo., L, 350. Potomac, The Army of the (see also Army of the Potomac), I., 282. Potomac Creek, Va.: bridge over, V., 272; VII., 41. Potomac River: I., 62; in Virginia, II., 19, 56; in Maryland and Virginia, II., 229; view of, from Berlin Heights, II., 266; Meade's army crossing at Berlin, II., 267; V., 80, 258; VI., 39, 92; flotilla and batteries, VI., 94, 95; U. S. flotilla, VI., 314; VII., 31; New York Ferry at, VIII., 39, 74; New York Seventh crossing, VIII., 76, 84, 282. Potter, C. H., IX., 59. Potter, E. E., X., 225. Potter, J. H., X., 219. Potter, R. B.: III., 90; X., 225. Potter's House, Atlanta, Ga. , III., 127. Potthoft, private, VIII, 125. Potts, surgeon, VII, 222. Potts, B., X., 233. Pound
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