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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 47 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for Richard K. Meade or search for Richard K. Meade in all documents.

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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
beaten. The battle of Boonsboro Gap was not anticipated by General Lee, and it came, on the 14th, in the nature of a surprise. Certainly Lee's army was not prepared for it. All that could be done was doneā€”the brigades of Hill and Longstreet, with such artillery as could be operated on the mountain, held back the advancing columns of Hooker and Reno until night put an end to the conflict. General McClellan reported the battle on his side as fought by the divisions of Hatch, Ricketts and Meade, of Hooker's corps; Willcox, Sturgis and Cox, of Reno's corps; and the brigade of Sedgwick, of Sherman's corps; with artillery and cavalry. That this force did not drive Hill in rout from the mountain before Longstreet came up is due to the firmness and heroism of his defense. That it did not envelop both Longstreet and Hill late in the afternoon, and force them down upon Boonsboro, is due to the skill of those generals, and the conduct of their troops and their commanders. Having alrea
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
orced to retire. At noon, the division of General Meade, supported on its right by that of Generale position at Hamilton's, held by A. P. Hill. Meade received the fire of McIntosh's and Pegram's, y drove back his advance. Promptly reforming, Meade and Gibbon marched steadily on through the artssault, and the battle was sternly contested. Meade and Gibbon pressed their attack and entered ther to his call, and they held Gibbon back, but Meade pressed on through the woods and took Gregg bor fear of damaging Lane and Archer. Suddenly Meade's troops came in sight of Orr's rifles on his n, on his right, and they stood firmly against Meade's attack, delivering their fire at close quartans charged and drove back the bold assault of Meade. Jackson sent Early forward, and a sweeping charge of his division drove Meade and Gibbon back and beyond the railroad. The attack on Gregg was its battle. At 10 o'clock on the 13th, while Meade and, Gibbon were assaulting A. P. Hill, and Su
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
truly, A. Lincoln. How far the anxious President's candid letter influenced the generalship of the new commander may be seen by what follows in description of his unhappy experiences in finding the enemy and testing his inferior equipment, intelligence and valor. On April 30, 1863, the Federal army under Hooker had 133,708 men actually available for the line of battle, organized in seven corps; the First under Reynolds, the Second under Couch, the Third under Sickles, the Fifth under Meade, the Sixth under Sedgwick, the Eleventh under Howard, the Twelfth under Slocum. The artillery included 370 guns, of all calibers. The cavalry force outnumbered General Lee's three to one. General Lee's army was numerically not as strong as at the battle of Fredericksburg, Longstreet having been sent south of the James with the divisions of Hood and Pickett, and Hampton's cavalry brigade having been sent into the interior to recruit its horses. Lee's army confronting Hooker numbered of
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
Potomac until the 25th and 26th, and on the 28th General Meade was placed in command of the Federal army. Onysburg, on the last day of June. On that day both Meade and Lee were marching unconsciously to the point at cavalry was promptly supported by the First corps of Meade's army, three divisions, under General Reynolds. Gen The break of day on the 2d revealed the army of General Meade in line of battle on the heights south of Gettysnumbers and equipment, confronted by the army of General Meade on the heights of Gettysburg, was one which gave come up on his left and confronted the main body of Meade's cavalry. The situation on his extreme right was mn of 15,000 could break the center, the wings of General Meade's army would be so shaken that both Longstreet aing a great cavalry battle with the main body of General Meade's cavalry. Stuart had the brigades of Hampton, army. After the defeat of the assaulting column, Meade was too cautious to risk his lines against the army
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
nd Brandy Station, and Young's brigade made a successful stand at Fleetwood hill on the 12th. On the 19th, at Haymarket and Buckland mills, when Kilpatrick was finally routed with the loss of 250 prisoners and General Custer's headquarters baggage, the First South Carolina gallantly led in the impetuous charge of Stuart's troopers. The rout at Buckland, said Stuart, was the most signal and complete that any cavalry has suffered during the war. When the great Federal army under Grant and Meade crossed the Rapidan in May, 1864, Longstreet had his corps again in Virginia, with headquarters at Gordonsville. Brig.-Gen. J. B. Kershaw was in command of McLaws' division, and his brigade was led by Col. John W. Henagan. Lieut.-Col. Franklin Gaillard commanded the Second, Colonel Nance the Third, Capt. James Mitchell the Seventh, Lieut.-Col. E. T. Stackhouse the Eighth, Col. John B. Davis the Fifteenth, Capt. B. M. Whitener the Third battalion. General Jenkins was in command of his brigad
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 19: (search)
Chapter 19: The Atlanta campaign battles around Atlanta Jonesboro Hood's campaign in North Georgiathe defense of Ship's Gap last campaign in Tennessee battle of Franklin. Simultaneous with the crossing of the Rapidan river in Virginia by the Federal army of Meade, Gen. W. T. Sherman, in command of the armies of the Cumberland, Tennessee and Ohio, under Thomas, McPherson and Schofield, in all about 100,000 strong, advanced against the army of Tennessee, then under Gen. J. E. Johnston, and occupying the valley and mountain strongholds about Dalton, on the railroad from Chattanooga to Atlanta. South Carolina was represented in each of Johnston's two corps, in Hardee's by the Sixteenth regiment, Col. James McCullough, and Twenty-fourth, Col. Ellison Capers, in Gist's brigade of W. H. T. Walker's division, and Ferguson's battery, Lieut. R. T. Beauregard; and in Hood's corps by the Tenth regiment, Col. James F. Pressley, and Nineteenth, Lieut.-Col. Thomas P. Shaw, in Ma
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
he was assigned to drilling artillery at Castle Pinckney and Fort Moultrie. Previous to the bombardment of Fort Sumter he was commissioned first lieutenant of the regiment of regular artillery, in charge of Fort Johnson, on Morris island, under command of Capt. John James. There Lieutenant Gibbes fired the signal gun for the attack on Fort Sumter, and immediately afterward fired a ten-inch shell from a mortar, which was the first shot fired at the fort, and, according to Federal Lieut. Richard K. Meade, fell inside the walls of Sumter. Not long after Lieutenant Gibbes resigned his rank in the State forces, and going to Richmond, was assigned to duty with Gen. H. A. Wise, with the rank of major and command of three batteries of artillery. He was on duty in West Virginia until in the autumn he was a victim of the typhoid fever which ravaged the troops in that region, and was disabled for six months. During his convalescence he was in command of a camp of instruction at Columbia, a