Browsing named entities in Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for W. Porcher Miles or search for W. Porcher Miles in all documents.

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e: Mr. Davis, then conspicuous for his ability, had long experience in the United States Senate in civil service, was reputed a most successful organizer and administrator of the military department of the United States when he was Secretary of War, and came out of the Mexican War with much ├ęclat as a soldier. Possessing a combination of these high and needful qualities, he was regarded by nearly the whole South as the fittest man for the position. I certainly so regarded him. Honorable W. Porcher Miles, of Virginia, formerly of South Carolina, and a member of the Provisional Congress of 1861, wrote: To the best of my recollection there was entire unanimity in the South Carolina delegation at Montgomery on the subject of the choice of a President. I think there was no question that Mr. Davis was the choice of our delegation and of the whole people of South Carolina. Thus Mr. Davis came to be the commander-in-chief of a country not yet torn loose from the clinging memories of a
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 65: the separation and imprisonment of our party. (search)
tates officers visited the ship, of whom I have no clear memory, except of the Roland Mrs. Clay gave them for the Oliver they offered. Two or three of them looked into my sister's state-room, with whom Mrs. Clay was sitting. She said, Gentlemen, do not look in here, it is a ladies' state-room. One of them threw the door open and said, There are no ladies here; to which Mrs. Clay responded, There certainly are no gentlemen there. They retired swearing out their wrath. The next day General Miles and some other officers came on board, and summoned Mrs. Clay and me. He was quite young, about, I should think, twenty-five, and seemed to have newly acquired his elevated position. He was not respectful, but I thought it was his ignorance of polite usage. He declined to tell me anything of my husband, or about our own destination, and said Davis had announced Mr. Lincoln's assassination the day before it happened, and he guessed he knew all about it. All newspapers were forbidden
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 66: cruelties practised at Fortress Monroe. (search)
Chapter 66: cruelties practised at Fortress Monroe. As the most conclusive evidence of General Miles's animus, and of the methods adopted toward Mr. Davis when he reached the fort, a statement rsonal reluctance he came to execute an order to put irons upon him. Mr. Davis asked whether General Miles had given that order, and on being answered in the affirmative, said he wished to see GeneraGeneral Miles. Captain Titlow replied that he had just left General Miles, who was leaving the fort. Mr. Davis then asked that the execution of the order should be postponed until General Miles returned. General Miles, who was leaving the fort. Mr. Davis then asked that the execution of the order should be postponed until General Miles returned. Captain Titlow said his orders would not permit that, and that to an old soldier it was needless to say that an officer was bound to execute such an order as it was given to him. Mr. Davis told himGeneral Miles returned. Captain Titlow said his orders would not permit that, and that to an old soldier it was needless to say that an officer was bound to execute such an order as it was given to him. Mr. Davis told him that it was too obvious that there could be no necessity for the use of such means to render his imprisonment secure, and on Captain Titlow repeating that his duty was to execute his orders, Mr. Dav
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 67: the tortures inflicted by General Miles. (search)
the grating at the tortured man, and that General Miles favored his friends with peeps at him when afternoon, at an interview sought with Major-General Miles, my opinion was given that the physicalve it, then, a medical necessity? queried General Miles. I do, most earnestly. May 27t from it in consequence of my report to Major-General Miles that their presence was counteracting emind, had been previously made by me to Major-General Miles, and had been confirmed, I rather beliegularly sent. The books sent were such as General Miles chose, though I sent a large box of books r perusal, and they had to be sent open to General Miles, and from him, he (Mr. Davis) understood, to his face. Reported his condition to Major-General Miles, respectfully asking permission to callsent a box of like garments, but they had, General Miles said, never been received; a subsequent onive matter, or what was deemed offensive. General Miles had returned to him several pages of a let[21 more...]
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 68: Hon. Hugh MacCULLOCHulloch's visit to Jefferson Davis at Fortress Monroe. (search)
Chapter 68: Hon. Hugh MacCULLOCHulloch's visit to Jefferson Davis at Fortress Monroe. The fact of the utter failure of Mr. Davis's health could no longer be concealed by General Miles's assurances of his comfort and the salubrity of his surroundings, and the Honorable Hugh MacCulloch, Secretary of the Treasury, determined to visit the prisoner at President Johnson's suggestion. In his Men and measures of half a Century, published in 1889, he describes his interview with Mr. Davis at Fortress Monroe. I have taken the liberty of condensing his statement. The question what shall be done to the Confederate leader was referred to at Mr. Lincoln's last meeting with his Cabinet. Mr. Lincoln merely remarked in his humorous way: I am a good deal like the Irishman who had joined a temperance society, but thought he might take a drink now and then if he drank unbeknown to himself. A good many people think that all the big Confederates ought to be arrested and tried as traitors.
Chapter 70: account of journey to Savannah. Letter to Dr. Craven. I wrote to Mr. Davis, hoping from the youth of General Miles some sympathetic impulse, and that he would read such parts of the letter to him as he might think unobjectionable; but the letter was suppressed, and I wrote another to Dr. Craven, intended for Mrhe tailor's shop, and down the Bay, the journals may give you the future history before it is known to me. My daily walks continue, the hour dependent upon General Miles's engagements, Sometimes General Miles said he forgot, sometimes was too busy, and often, very often, the walk was so late and so curtailed as to do the emaGeneral Miles said he forgot, sometimes was too busy, and often, very often, the walk was so late and so curtailed as to do the emaciated sufferer no good, but rather harm. as I only go out when he can be present. Deprived of the opportunity to assemble with the members of the church, there is left to me the spirit communion with those I daily and nightly summon to meet together in His name, who is ever present, and thus I have read the morning service, in
nd for the present there is a stool which answers for a washstand. My clothes are not with me, except those in immediate use. My valise was taken charge of by General Miles. I have not seen it since. I much regret that you did not keep the things which had a value from association, instead of leaving them in the valise. Fortreso your renewed request, and wrote minute description of my room, its furniture, the beats of the sentinels, etc.; that part of my letter was objected to By General Miles. and was rewritten accordingly. Let me renew the caution against believing the statements of correspondents in regard to me. To calumniate a state prisoner anew garrison, and stating a consequent alteration in the matter of sentinels, which I was required to obliterate. I drew the pen through it and sent it back. General Miles afterward told me that it had still been legible as I left it, and added something not distinctly heard beyond the point of main interest, that the letter had
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 43: visit to New Orleans and admission to Fortress Monroe. (search)
n him. Among other things, he told me that General Miles never walked with him on the ramparts, in g years that have intervened. At first General Miles fixed the shortest period and certain hourelf of my arm, though he would not lean on General Miles. One day the General sent his orderly once, when my husband was taken prisoner. General Miles disclaimed any knowledge of them, and adde no further denial. We excused much to General Miles, whose opportunities to learn the habits o to Mr. Davis by some ladies in St. Louis, General Miles noticed the arrival of the package addresswhole case before him. When the matter of General Miles's objection to Mr. Davis having oysters wavis for an expression of his opinion about General Miles's conduct to him, saying that, from Mr. Dand and to himself, than those inflicted by General Miles upon Mr. Davis. Mr. Davis's silence in hisage and broken health, avenge. One day General Miles came to the prison and said something not [14 more...]