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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 34 (search)
-dozen home-guards led by a disabled Confederate officer. A skirmish ensued, and the big blonde dragoon was wounded-John Miller, of the One Hundred and First Ohio cavalry. He and a comrade made their way across the river to a farm-house, and there eternity: Unshrived, unhouseled, unannalled. Passing swiftly to the inner room, the Confederate officer found John Miller in bed, the woman of the house bending over him with a bottle of camphor, or spirits of some kind, in her hand. He hao desperate for him to dare, we heard; and one of his comrades remarked: In liquor, old Belzebub himself couldn't head John Miller. But the gallant man who rid the world of such a wretch, lives still, for aught I know, in prosperous security, and Jead John Miller. But the gallant man who rid the world of such a wretch, lives still, for aught I know, in prosperous security, and John Miller's ghost was never laid. It lingers yet in the cold shadows of that ruined house on Haw river. C. D. M.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Return of a refugee. (search)
lessed. Next morning found me awaiting the train at this improvised depot, with a motley crowd, consisting chiefly of citizens of African descent and Yankee soldiers. The latter made themselves conspicuous in their character of conquerors on all possible opportunities—now ordering Cuffee about in a most masterful and patronizing manner, and anon befriending (?) him against the encroachments of his quondam masters. It was the first time I had met the blue-coats since my encounter with John Miller, and hot flashes of indignation and wrath, and something possibly worse, kept me at fever-heat from the first glimpse of them upon arriving at the station. Still I kept my lips compressed even when several of these creatures, dressed in a little brief authority, abused and insulted an old man for not giving a colored lady the entire sidewalk as he came down breathless, with bag, basket and umbrella, to meet the approaching train. Once embarked, I ceased to hear or see them, as only t