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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 16 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
e till noon of the 23d, when I was directed by General Newton to march my brigade in the direction of the Etowah River at Gillem's Bridge, which was reached before sundown, but the road being filled with troops and transportation from other divisions my brigade was delayed crossing till long after dark. After crossing the river we marched some four miles in the direction of Euharlee Creek, and bivouacked for the night. On the 24th we again moved forward, crossed the Euharlee at [Barrett's] Mills, and, crossing Raccoon Greek by [Dallas] road, went into camp for the night near Burnt Hickory. This evening a heavy rain fell. On the 25th we moved forward, following General Kimball, commanding First Brigade, who was in advance of the division. Nothing of moment occurred until we crossed Pumpkin Vine Creek, on the road leading to New Hope Church, where we found that the Twentieth Corps, in our advance, had met and engaged the enemy. We went into position to support those of the Twentie
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 58 (search)
West Point railroad near Red Oak Station and moving in an easterly direction. About 11 a. m. the brigade was detached from the division, for the purpose of guarding the corps' trains, which were moving on a road to the right leading toward the Fayetteville pike, rejoining and camping with the division that night at — Church, southwest of Rough and Ready and four miles from the Macon railroad. At 8 a. m. August 31 marched with the division in an easterly direction, crossing Flint River at-- Mills, where, striking a by-road to the right and south of the main road, we moved in the direction of the Macon railroad, striking the same near Rough and Ready about 4 p. m. and assisted in its destruction. Near night-fall we took position, fronting south, on the right of the road, throwing up temporary works. Next morning at 7 a. m. marched with the division, following the main Jon esborough road to a point four miles from the town, when, leaving the road to the right, over by-roads, we again
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 95 (search)
of my staff. Dr. Solon Marks, chief surgeon of the division; Lieut. H. G. Litchfield, ordnance officer, and Lieut. W. R. Maize, in charge of ambulances, are deserving of mention for the faithful performance of their duties in their respective departments. Col. M. F. Moore, Sixty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, deserves special mention for the promptness with which he always obeyed orders, and put his command in motion. The staff officers of the Second Brigade, Captain Mills, Lieutenant Estes, and Lieutenant St. Onge, and especially Capt. W. J. Fetterman, acting assistant adjutant-general of the brigade, displayed great gallantry and spirit in assisting Maj. J. R. Edie, Fifteenth Infantry, in advancing the brigade. The regimental officers and enlisted men cannot be over praised for their conduct. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. P. Carlin, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Capt. A. C. McCLURG, Asst. Adjt. Gen. and Chief of Staff, 14th Ar
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 104 (search)
ing the men forward at the time he was wounded. Captain Hull, of the same regiment, then assumed command, and fully sustained his high reputation as a soldier. It is due to the three officers serving on the brigade staff, Captains Fetterman and Mills, Eighteenth Infantry, and Lieutenant Estes, Sixteenth Infantry, to say that throughout the whole day's operations, their conduct was conspicuous for gallantry and bravery in the discharge of their duties. Appended I have the honor to submit a yards of the enemy's intrenchments till the morning of the 16th, being under fire all the time. On this morning, the commanding officer of the Eighteenth Infantry having been directed to detail a company to advance and feel for the enemy, Capt. Anson Mills was sent with his company to the front and entered Resaca, returning with some 20 prisoners, and reporting that the enemy had evacuated Resaca and left our front. The brigade then moved into Resaca, and on the morning of the 17th started w
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 110 (search)
the immediate command of Capt. William J. Fetterman. The officers serving with the command were Capt. G. W. Smith, commanding detachment and First Battalion; Capt. W. J. Fetterman, commanding Second Battalion; Capts. R. B. Hull, A. B. Denton, Anson Mills, A. S. Burt, M. L. Ogden, R. L. Morris, Jr., and P. R. Forney (in arrest during the campaign); Lieuts. James Powell, Frederick Phisterer, adjutant detachment and Second Battalion; D. W. Benham, quartermaster First Battalion; Frederick H. Brownt of the day, driving the rebels. On the 14th skirmished all day heavily, driving the rebels to their outer works at Resaca, Ga. 15th, skirmishing all day. On the 16th the enemy abandoned his position at Resaca, and the command marched in. Capt. Anson Mills having been ordered out with a small force, returned in a short time with 20 prisoners. The command marched on the 17th, crossing the Connesauga River, and camped twelve miles from Resaca; on the 18th eight miles to Adairsville. I should
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 111 (search)
the field of battle, viz: Capt. G. W. Smith, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for good conduct and gallantry on the 4th of July, 1864; Capt. R. B. Hull; Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry on the 7th of August, 1864; the same for great gallantry on the 1st of September, 1864; Capt. W. J. Fetterman, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for good conduct and gallantry on the 4th of July, 1864; Capt. Ansel B. Denton, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for good conduct and gallantry on the 4th of July, 1864; Capt. Anson Mills, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry and skill on the 4th of July, 1864; Capt. A. S. Burt, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry on the 1st September, 1864; First Lieut. Thomas B. Burrowes, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry on the 7th of August, 1864; the same for gallantry on the 1st of September, 1864, when he was severely wounded; First Lieut. James Powell, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, for gallantry on the 4th of July, 1864; the same for great gallantry on the 7th of Au
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 112 (search)
cipated in the whole campaign; commanded Company A, Second Battalion, and the Second Battalion until June 11; appointed on brigade staff July 15. Capt. Philip R. Forney, in arrest under charges when campaign opened ; resigned June 3; resignation accepted. Capt. Ansel B. Denton, commanded Company C, Second Battalion, till August 23; resigned and leave of absence granted August 23. Capt. Richard L. Morris, Jr., commanded Company D, First Battalion; left sick at Kenesaw Mountain June 26. Capt. Anson Mills participated in whole campaign; commanded Company H, First Battalion, till August 25, when appointed on brigade staff; slightly wounded July 30. Capt. Andrew S. Burt, commanded Companies F, First, and G, Third Battalion, and participated in the whole campaign, except battle of Jonesborough, September 1. Capt. Morgan L. Ogden, on sick report when campaign opened; left sick at Dallas May 27. First Lieut. Thomas B. Burrowes, joined command at Dallas June 2; commanded Company G, Second Bat
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 170 (search)
ners captured, as by far the greatest number were sent to the rear without guards, as I had only men enough to fight the armed rebels in front. Among my prisoners, however, were Colonel Smith, commanding Sixth and Seventh Arkansas; Lieut. Col. Philip Lee, commanding Second Kentucky; Major Maxson, commanding Sixth Kentucky, besides a large number of commissioned officers. Captain Newman, of my staff, delivered 26 commissioned officers and 196 enlisted men over to corps headquarters, and Captain Mills, of the Eighteenth Regulars, informed me he had in addition secured some 350 rebels running to the rear, who were captured by my brigade. Lieutenant Kuder, Seventyfourth Indiana, with his own hand, captured the colors and color bearer of the Eighth and Nineteenth Arkansas Battery, and Companies A, F, and D of that regiment unquestionably captured their guns and most of the men belonging to the battery some time before the arrival of any support upon the right, as is evidenced by accomp
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mills, Anson 1834- (search)
Mills, Anson 1834- Military officer; born in Boone county, Ind., Aug. 31, 1834; studied in the United States Military Academy in 1855-57; was surveyor of the commission to determine the boundary between New Mexico, Indian Territory, and Texas; served with distinction throughout the Civil War. When peace was declared he was assigned to frontier duty and participated in nearly all of the Indian wars. He was promoted brigadier-general, June 16, 1897, and was retired six days later. He invented the woven cartridge belt, also the loom by which it is made, which the government adopted for use in the army and navy.
ed troops, behaved gallantly. I respectfully recommend him for promotion. Lieutenant-Colonel C. H. Grosvenor, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers, behaved nobly in leading a charge on the rebel works, on the Raine's place. The following officers of my staff accompanied me on the campaign, and discharged all the duties that devolved upon them in a most satisfactory manner: Colonel C. S. Cotter, First Ohio light artillery; Chief of Artillery, Major S. B. Moe ; Assistant Adjutant-General, Captain A. Mills, Eighteenth United States infantry; Inspector, Captain M. Davis, Fourteenth Ohio volunteers; Aide-de-Camp, Captain W. B. Steedman, Fourteenth Ohio volunteers; Aide-de-Camp, Lieutenant J. G. McAdams, Sixth Kentucky cavalry, A. C. S. Colonel H. B. Banning, One Hundred and Twenty-first Ohio volunteers, served me ably as a provost marshal. Captain A. R. Keller, Assistant Quartermaster, reported to me, and rendered me efficient service as quartermaster for my command. I am deeply indeb
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