hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 248 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 78 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 65 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 63 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 32 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 31 7 Browse Search
Col. Robert White, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.2, West Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 9 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 612 results in 54 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Book notices. (search)
or, and has produced a book of historic value which will be widely read. It was not remarkable, perhaps, that Federal commanders during the war should have so egregiously overestimated our numbers; but it is entirely inexcusable that a historian at this day (with easy access to the official reports of the Confederate generals) should commit the same blunders. Mr. Bates puts Hill's corps at Fredericksburg at 30,000 men, Stuart's cavalry at Brandy Station at 12,000, the force which environed Milroy at Winchester at 60,000, and General Lee's entire force at Gettysburg at 107,000 men. Now the truth is that these figures are most inexcusable exaggerations. General Lee's entire force at Gettysburg was not quite 57,000 men. Ah! if our grand old chieftan had commanded the numbers which Northern generals and Northern writers attribute to him, then the story of Gettysburg and of the war would have been far different. Sherman's Historical raid. By H. V. Boynton. Cincinnati: Wilstach, Bal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
y of Saint Louis the criminal vote elected the criminal McNeil as the sheriff of the county of Saint Louis--the tool of the weakest and most malignant tyrants. Milroy's order. Saint George, Tucker Co., Va., November 28th, 1862. Mr. Adam Harper: Sir — In consequence of certain robberies which have been committed on Uni good their losses; and upon your failure to comply with the above assessment by the 8th day of December, the following order has been issued to me by Brigadier-General R. H. Milroy: You are to burn their houses, seize all their property and shoot them. You will be sure that you strictly carry out this order. You will informay approach, that they must dash in and give you notice, and upon any one failing to do so, you will burn their houses and shoot the men. By order Brigadier-General R. H. Milroy, H. Kellog, Captain Commanding Post. Mr. Harper was an old gentlemen, over 82 years of age, a cripple,. and can neither read nor write the Engli
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Review of Bates' battle of Gettysburg. (search)
n without the sacrifices. The truth is this: General Lee left Culpeper on his march northward, June 10th, with not over 60,000 effective troops of all arms. He had some severe cavalry fighting east of the Blue Ridge, and dispersed or captured Milroy's force at Winchester. At this last place he was joined by a small body of cavalry, a battalion of infantry and a battery. This addition did not compensate for the losses in battle, the detachment left to guard the prisoners taken from Milroy, Milroy, and to protect communication to the Potomac. So that General Lee crossed the Potomac with under 60,000 men, including his cavalry. From 55,000 to 58,000 (counting all the cavalry) of this number were probably at Gettysburg. The foregoing accords with General Lee's statement to the writer, since the war, of his forces in the Pennsylvania campaign. It is confirmed by other information. 1. In the Historical Magazine of August, 1867, is re-published an article from the New York Tribune, con
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Diary of Robert E. Park, Macon, Georgia, late Captain Twelfth Alabama regiment, Confederate States army. (search)
s once an organ-grinder in Mobile and now belonging to the Guarde La Fayette, Company A, of my regiment, exerted themselves to imitate the vandalism of Hunter and Milroy and their thieving followers while they occupied the fair Valley of Virginia. Private property ought to be — and is, generally — respected by Confederate soldier Hunter, in Virginia. Breckinridge is the very soul of honor, as are all our leading generals. The meanest private in our army would not sanction the conduct of Milroy and Hunter. July 12th Some heavy skirmishing occurred to-day, and one of my regiment was wounded. The sharpshooters, and Fifth Alabama, which supported thestess. Mrs. C------gave me some interesting facts connected with the treatment of the good people of the Valley of Virginia by that cruel coward and villain, General Milroy, who a short while ago fled before us so fleetly and ignominiously. She had been badly mistreated by him herself. Indeed he appeared to take a peculiar plea
y one of the hardest battles of the war was fought at Alleghany Camp, Pocohontas County, Virginia, between Gen. R. H. Milroy, commanding the Union troops, and Gen. Johnson, of Georgia, commanding the rebels. The fight lasted from daylight till three P. M. The Union loss is about thirty, and the rebel loss over two hundred, including a major and many other officers, and thirty prisoners. Gen. Johnson was shot in the mouth, but not fatally. The Twelfth Georgia regiment suffered the most. Gen. Milroy's force numbered seven hundred and fifty men from the Ninth and Thirteenth Indiana, and the Twenty-fifth and Thirty-second Ohio and the Second Virginia. Gen. Johnson's force numbered over two thousand men. The Ninth Indiana regiment fought bravely to the last. After driving the enemy into their barracks no less than five times, the Nationals retired in good order. The rebels set fire to their camp and retreated to Staunton.--(Doc. 226.) Wm. H. Johnson, of the Lincoln Cavalry, sente
fall back to Harper's Ferry, and I so ordered Milroy. I have been on the ground and gave it advise all public stores from here in six hours. R. H. Milroy, Major-General. Late on Friday night, whether I am to abandon this place or not. R. H. Milroy, Major-General. To this communication spectfully, Your most obedient servant, R. H. Milroy, Major-General. Lieutenant-Colonel don Piafell back toward Winchester, as ordered by General Milroy, proceeding by way of Smithfield and Marti fort, with twenty-pounder Parrotts, where General Milroy was with most of the command. The middlebel corps numbering over thirty thousand. General Milroy ought to have known this. Who can say tha. C., Sept. 10, 1863. Appendix. Major-General Milroy requests the Court to summon, in his be examination, in which he suggests that Major-General Milroy is on another stampede. It is proper thould be required to say when and where Major-General Milroy was guilty of stampeding. Other similar[18 more...]
ly stormed the works at the latter place, and the whole army of General Milroy was captured or dispersed. Most of those who attempted to escaPleasanton, about the first of June. On the thirteenth ultimo, General Milroy was attacked at Winchester by the advance of Lee's army under Gself with any such activity. He watched, waited, and was puzzled. Milroy's stampede, the clamor of which, it seems, might have come to him frces had crossed the Potomac, the enemy had attacked and routed General Milroy's command at Winchester, and the forces at Harper's Ferry and v blue pants among them, some of those, doubtless, that were left by Milroy at Winchester. Their shoes, as a general thing, were poor; some ofthe corps which moved down through the Shenandoah Valley, surprised Milroy at Winchester, and was the first to cross the Potomac at Shepherdste were armed entirely with Enfield rifles taken at Winchester after Milroy's retreat. In speaking of our soldiers, the same officer remarked:
Chambersburgh Repository account. on Sunday evening, June fourteenth, the dark clouds of contrabands commenced rushing upon us, bringing the tidings that General Milroy's forces at Martinsburgh had been attacked and scattered, and that the rebels, under General Rhodes, were advancing upon Pennsylvania. With due allowance forousehold effects, sable babies, etc., and horses and wagons and cattle crowded every avenue to places of safety. About nine o'clock in the morning the advance of Milroy's retreating wagon-train dashed into town, attended by a few cavalry, and several affrighted wagon-masters, all of whom declared that the rebels were in hot pursu to avoid a general search and probable sacking of the town. The arms were assorted — the indifferent destroyed, and the good taken along. On Tuesday a few of Milroy's cavalry, escaping from Martinsburgh, were seen by the redoubtable Jenkins hovering in his front. Although but thirteen in number, and without the least appetit
th becoming resignation to imperious necessity. What shall yet be our fate or the fate of our beloved country must be developed by the future. God grant us a happy deliverance The rebel force in and around the borough of York, consisted of Early's division, made up of Gordon's, Hoke's, Hayes's, and Smith's ( Extra Billy, recently elected Governor of Virginia) brigades, and numbered about ten thousand.men in cavalry, artillery, and infantry. Their cannon were part of those captured from Milroy at Winchester, and consisted of heavy brass pieces and five-inch Parrott rifled guns. Some of these were planted on the hills commanding the borough early on Sunday morning. The amount of money received by the rebels in York, on their requisition or demand for one hundred thousand dollars, was about twenty-eight thousand dollars. The compliance, in part, of their demand, beyond all doubt saved the burning of all the shops and buildings of the railway company and machine-shops where gover
e, that, by God's help, when the time came, I would remember this happy baptism of virgin lips. One woman in this town was thorough Union. She faced a crowd of men in the street and talked with much spirit; had a husband in Bragg's army, she said, and argued the question of the war very glibly, but not logically. I was glad to find, on inquiry, that she was from Massachusetts. Her tongue, I fancy, drove her husband so far from her. With some of the poorer classes the Yankees have, during Milroy's reign, become very familiar, and one of my sergeants found a Yankee concealed in one of their houses. The country between Martinsburgh and Winchester is much desolated; little grain raised; the lands not good. On Thursday evening we crossed the Potomac at Williamsport. The river is one hundred and fifty yards wide here, but not more than two and a half feet deep. The day was cool and rainy, but the boys waded in cheerfully, and the air was rent with shouts of laughter as now and then
1 2 3 4 5 6