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chard Taylor, who fought under the eye of Stonewall Jackson in the Valley, and whose men charged and took Shields's batteries at Port Republic, and who in Louisiana hurled back in disorder the magnificent army of Banks. Bishop General Polk, our saintly gallant veteran, whose death left our country, and especially the Church, mourning; Harry T. Hayes, Yorke, Nicholls, Gibson, Gladden, and Moulton, who charged with his men up the hill at Winchester into the fort deemed impregnable, and put Milroy's army to flight; C. E. Fenner, Now Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of Louisiana. who, with his Batteries of Donaldsonville, under Maurin and Prosper Landry, achieved distinction; the Louisiana Guard, under D'Aquin, Thompson, and Green, all gallant gentlemen whose renown their countrymen treasure above price. From Georgia came Commander Tattnall, John B. Gordon, that gallant knight whose bravery and skill forced him through rank to rank to the highest command. Wounded in ever
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gen. Lee's strength and losses at Gettysburg. (search)
ee crossed the Potomac, putting the aggregate cavalry loss during the campaign at 1,100, and thus brings up the Confederate loss to the neighborhood of 24,000 men. But with what propriety this addition should be made to the losses at GettysburgI am at aloss to perceive. The two cavalry fights mentioned cost the Federals, according to Gen. Gregg, commanding one of the Federal cavalry divisions (see Philadelphia Times, March 31st, 1877), about 1,000 men, and between the dates of these combats Milroy was overthrown at Winchester, with a loss of over 4,500 men. These Federal losses are of course not included in Gen. Meade's aggregate of 23,186 lost.-- has omitted Ewell's loss at Winchester, June 15th, from his aggregate of Confederate losses. He should have omitted Stuart's also, as otherwise his statement is confusing and inaccurate. I have carefully re-examined Dr. Bates' statement, as well as the other data at hand, in regard to the strength of the respective armies, but do not fi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Causes of the defeat of Gen. Lee's Army at the battle of Gettysburg-opinions of leading Confederate soldiers. (search)
more powerful than it had ever been before. As a question of numbers, this is an error. The field returns of the army of the 31st May, 1863, show General Lee's total effectives to have been a few hundred over sixtyeight thousand (68,000). I have a copy of this return, which I made from the original now in the war office at Washington. He received no reinforcements, and this was the maximum of General Lee's strength in the Pennsylvania campaign. Ewell's corps had some fighting with Milroy in the Valley; the cavalry had considerable skirmishing east of the mountains before crossing the Potomac; made the circuit of the Federal army on the other side; had more fighting and incessant hard riding until the evening of the 2d of July, second day's fight, when it joined General Lee. The infantry was reduced by the guards left on the Virginia side to protect captured property and escort prisoners, and of all arms General Lee had not at Gettysburg over 62,000 men. On his return to Vir
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Second paper by Colonel Walter H. Taylor, of General Lee's staff. (search)
early in the month of June, General Lee moved his army northward by way of Culpeper, and thence to and down the Valley of Virginia to Winchester. The army had been reorganized into three army corps, designated the First, Second and Third corps, and commanded respectively by Lieutenant-Generals Longstreet, Ewell and A. P. Hill. The Seeonl corps was in advance, and crossed the branches of the Shenandoah, near Front Royal, on the 12th of June. Brushing aside the force of the enemy, under General Milroy, that occupied the lower Valley-most of which was captured and the remnant of which sought refuge in the fortifications at Harper's Ferry-General Ewell crossed the Potomac river with his three divisions in the latter part of June, and, in pursuance of the orders of General Lee, traversed Maryland and advanced into Pennsylvania. General A. P. Hill, whose corps was the last to leave the line of the Rappahannock, followed with his three divisions in Ewell's rear. General Longstreet covered
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 4. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Leading Confederates on the battle of Gettysburg. (search)
ters stood thus: Hooker in my front, with an army more than a hundred thousand strong; Foster preparing to advance into North Carolina; Dix preparing to advance on Richmond from Fortress Monroe; Tyler in the Kanawha Valley preparing to unite with Milroy, who was in the Valley of Virginia, collecting men and material for an advance on Staunton. To oppose these movements I'had sixty thousand men. It would have been folly to have divided my army; the armies of the enemy were too far apart for me troblem in every possible phase, and to my mind it resolved itself into the choice of one of two things-either to retire on Richmond and stand a siege, which must ultimately have ended in surrender, or to invade Pennsylvania. I chose the latter. Milroy was in my route; I crushed him, and as soon as the First corps of my army crossed the Potomac, orders were issued countermanding the advance of Foster and Dix. As soon as my Second corps crossed Hooker loosened his hold, and Old Virginia was free
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore), Border war, as seen and experienced by the inhabitants of Chambersburgh, Pa. (search)
long race, Was a carriage that looked like R----n's, Which seemed “like he gwine to leab de place,” Through fear of the mighty Jenkins. ‘Mid shriek, and yell, and cry, and shout, And peals of wicked laughter, On, hurried on, the rabble rout, With Milroy's wagons after. Pell-mell, Helter-skelter, Hurry-skurry, Toss and tumble, Roll and rumble, And dust to make us blind, most; Thus Milroy's trains Came over plains, And rills and ridges, Brooks and bridges, Let worst be worst, The best man first, AMilroy's trains Came over plains, And rills and ridges, Brooks and bridges, Let worst be worst, The best man first, And devil take the hindmost. And sure enough, when all had gone, And night put her sable garments on, Came Jenkins, the guerrilla chief, And arrant traitor, and braggart, and thief, To pay us that long-threatened visit. His rebs were dirty as dirt could make 'em, And Jenkins himself may have been a sachem, A man or gorilla, a monkey or fairy, Or p'rhaps the famous “What is it?” Which usually goes with “travelling shows.” But whatever he was, no one I suppose, Will deny he was wretchedly di
An anecdote. The rebel General Stuart and General Milroy had a conversation, in which General Milroy censured the system of guerrilla warfare practised by the rebels at that time, in the most sevGeneral Milroy censured the system of guerrilla warfare practised by the rebels at that time, in the most severe terms. General Stuart remarked that this species of warfare was practised by our troops in Mexico. General Milroy asked him where he obtained his information. General Stuart--I road of it. General Milroy asked him where he obtained his information. General Stuart--I road of it. General Milroy--You are mistaken, sir! 'Twas not done, sir! I was in Mexico myself. In the course of conversation, General Stuart feigned impatience at the time consumed in burying the dead, andGeneral Milroy--You are mistaken, sir! 'Twas not done, sir! I was in Mexico myself. In the course of conversation, General Stuart feigned impatience at the time consumed in burying the dead, and said he was in a hurry, as he intended to sup in Culpeper that evening. The conference ended by General Milroy remarking: You may sup there, sir; but I will sit at the head of the table. dead, and said he was in a hurry, as he intended to sup in Culpeper that evening. The conference ended by General Milroy remarking: You may sup there, sir; but I will sit at the head of the table.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Lee's invasion of Pennsylvania. (search)
follow, and the cavalry was to move along on our right flank to the east of us. Thus, by threatening his rear we could draw Hooker from his position on Stafford Heights opposite Fredericksburg. Our movements at the beginning of the campaign were necessarily slow in order that we might be sure of having the proper effect on Hooker. Ewell was started off to the valley of Virginia to cross the mountains and move in the direction of Winchester, which was occupied by considerable forces under Milroy. I was moving at the same time east of the Blue Ridge with Stuart's cavalry on my right so as to occupy the gaps from Ashby on to Harper's Ferry. Ewell, moving on through the valley, captured troops and supplies at Winchester, and passed through Martinsburg and Williamsport into Maryland. As I moved along the eastern slope of the Blue Ridge we heard from day to day of the movements of Hooker's army, and that he had finally abandoned his position on Stafford Heights, and was moving up the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
alley; he had already sent Imboden toward Cumberland to destroy the railroad and canal from that place to Martinsburg. Milroy's Federal division, about 9000 strong, occupied Winchester, with McReynolds's brigade in observation at Berryville. Kelly, with a detachment of 1200 infantry and a battery under Colonel B. F. Smith at Martinsburg. On the night of June 11th, Milroy received instructions to join Kelley, but, reporting that he could hold Winchester, was authorized to remain there. Ewelttack, carried the outworks, driving the garrisons into the body of the place. This capture was a complete surprise, and Milroy called a council of war, which decided on an immediate retreat, abandoning the artillery and wagons. Ewell had anticipatize and command them, but disbelief in the danger — due to previous false alarms — caused delays until the fugitives from Milroy's command, followed by Jenkins's cavalry, roused the country. Defensive works were then thrown up at Harrisburg and else
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 2: Lee's invasion of Maryland and Pennsylvania. (search)
's fords, 50. Ewell in the Shenandoah Valley Milroy driven from Winchester a great disaster, 51. pike, and arrived before Winchester, where General Milroy was in command of about ten thousand men, full one hundred miles in length. Although Milroy, since the first of the month, had felt a preshave justified him in retreating at once. But Milroy, brave even to rashness, resolved to fight befnandoah, retreated before Rodes, and very soon Milroy had his forces, not more than seven thousand eon. At one o'clock the next morning June 15. Milroy, in compliance with the decision of a council ania; and others fled to Harper's Ferry, where Milroy's wagon-train crossed the Potomac, and was consburg, by way of Hagerstown and Chambersburg. Milroy lost nearly all of his artillery and ammunitioled Howe across the river, and on the day when Milroy was driven from Winchester, June 15, 1863. hecross the river at Williamsport, in pursuit of Milroy's wagon-train, swept up the Cumberland Valley [2 more...]
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