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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 6: the genius of Universal emancipation.1829-30. (search)
it gave much attention to the proceedings of the Virginia Convention for the revision of the State Oct., 1829, to Jan., 1830. constitution, a body remarkable for the number of able and distinguished men it contained; ex-Presidents Madison and Monroe, and John Randolph, being among them. As it has always been a favorite assertion and pretence of some Northern apologists for slavery that Virginia and G. T. Curtis's Life of Buchanan, 2.273. Kentucky were on the verge of instituting schemes as the latter, by adding three-fifths of all the slaves, gave an undue preponderance to the eastern counties, where the slaves were far more numerous than in the mountainous western district. This was hotly debated for many days, but Madison and Monroe threw their influence against it, and it was finally defeated by a close vote, leaving the control of the State in the hands of the slaveholding section. It is easy to see what fate any scheme of emancipation, however remote and gradual, would h
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 14: the Boston mob (first stage).—1835. (search)
sregard them. This pro-slavery higher-law doctrine was identical with that on which the right of secession and the falsity of Federal officers to their oaths were afterwards based. I cannot, he continued, sanction, and will not condemn, the step you have taken. Your justification must be looked for in the character of the papers detained, and the circumstances by which you are surrounded. Even more frankly, when the postmaster in New York, Samuel L. Gouverneur, son-in-law of ex-President Monroe. The New York Evening Post, edited by the intrepid William Leggett, alone of the party press of that city, protested against the postmaster's action (Lib. 5: 152; Evening Post, Aug. 29, 1835). On August 19, Henry Benson wrote to his brother that the Liberators for Philadelphia had apparently been detained by postmasters and boat captains (Ms.) All delays or failures of the mail naturally came to be attributed to the same cause by the abolitionists (Lib. 5.137). Jackson-like, took the