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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 75 7 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1 8 0 Browse Search
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1 6 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 3 1 Browse Search
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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 13: England.—June, 1838, to March, 1839.—Age, 27-28. (search)
; of Maltby, Milman, and Sydney Smith, among divines; of Robert Ingham, John Kenyon, Monckton Milnes (Lord Houghton), Basil Montagu, and Charles Vaughan, among genial friends who wrote or loved good books; of Brougham, Durham, Inglis, Cornewall Lewilandscapes which had inspired his verse. Among women to whose society he was admitted were the Duchess of Sutherland, Mrs. Montagu, Joanna Baillie, Mrs. Jameson, Mrs. Sarah Austin, Miss Martineau, Mrs. Shelley, Mrs. Marcet, Mrs. Grote, Lady Morgan, ercourse in later visits to Europe: and there were those, like Lord Morpeth, Robert Ingham, Joseph Parkes, and Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, with whom a lifelong friendship was established. The persons already named are referred to more or less frequentlyway, generally older than himself, most have died, —including his dearest friends Morpeth, Ingham, Parkes, and Mr. and Mrs. Montagu. The few who survive have, in most instances, contributed for this memoir their recollections of him, still vivid aft
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
evening last week—till long past midnight—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession. He co-operated with Romilly in er's daughter. Sumner made the acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, through Mr. Parkes. They werMrs. Montagu, through Mr. Parkes. They were charmed with him, and ever after regarded him with a tenderness like that of parents. Mrs. MontagMrs. Montagu predicted even then his future eminence. His relations to them and to the Procters have been toucesent Mr. Fields, Kinglake, and Leigh Hunt. Mr. Montagu was full of Bacon, and told me it was said 's mansion about twenty miles from London. Mrs. Montagu is a remarkable woman. As ever yours, C.n conversing with for three hours or more!—Basil Montagu; one of the sweetest men, with honeyed disname, with the affectionate good wishes of Basil Montagu. I have been amused at what was told me t<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, December 5. (search)
very pleasant evening last week—till long past midnight—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He wasMrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, hisBasil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession. He co-operated with Romilly in the movement to abolish capital executions for minor offences, was Mr. Procter's daughter. Sumner made the acquaintance of Mr. and Mrs. Montagu, through Mr. Parkes. They were charmed witMrs. Montagu, through Mr. Parkes. They were charmed with him, and ever after regarded him with a tenderness like that of parents. Mrs. Montagu predicted even then his future eminMrs. Montagu predicted even then his future eminence. His relations to them and to the Procters have been touched upon by James T. Fields, in a paper contributed to Harperwhich were present Mr. Fields, Kinglake, and Leigh Hunt. Mr. Montagu was full of Bacon, and told me it was said of him that ith him to visit Bacon's mansion about twenty miles from London. Mrs. Montagu is a remarkable woman. As ever yours, C
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 28, 1838. (search)
, the thought crossed my mind to appropriate it, and make my fortune by selling it to some of his absurd admirers in America. But I let the goose-quill sleep. What a different person I have just been conversing with for three hours or more!—Basil Montagu; one of the sweetest men, with honeyed discourse, that I ever met. His mind is running over with beautiful images and with boundless illustration and allusion. He has known as bosom friends Mackintosh, Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Lord Eldon; ours out his heart, as I freely mention their names, like water. He has just published a charming little book, entitled, Essays and Selections; and he has given me a copy, in which he has written my name, with the affectionate good wishes of Basil Montagu. I have been amused at what was told me to-night with regard to my admission to the Athenaeum. I am an Honorary Member, admitted as a foreigner of distinction, a title which it made me shrink to see applied to my name. But it seems I was n
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
is a sweet person; she is the daughter of my friend, Mrs. Basil Montagu, and has munch of her mother's information and intelligence. There is no place that I enjoy more than Basil Montagu's. He is simple in his habits, never dines out, or gives din Wordsworth, Lamb, were all familiar at their fireside. Mr. Montagu is often pronounced a bore, because he perpetually quotearkable women I have ever known. Dr. Parr always called Mr. Montagu by his Christian name, Basil; and his wife, Basilissa; , for the abrupt character which it has. I once spoke of Mr. Montagu to Talfourd as a person whom I liked very much, when theut its chief supporters were Parkes and Charles Austin and Montagu. It was established by the Radicals, to show that they we2, 1839. but I do value the testimony of a person like Mrs. Montagu, herself the friend of Coleridge, Wordsworth, and Parr.to our country that is interesting from such a source. Mrs. Montagu's kind language about me may show you that I am not yet
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Jan. 23, 1839. (search)
eard. Airs. Procter is a sweet person; she is the daughter of my friend, Mrs. Basil Montagu, and has munch of her mother's information and intelligence. There is no place that I enjoy more than Basil Montagu's. He is simple in his habits, never dines out, or gives dinners. I step into his house, perhaps, after I have been dinish, Coleridge, Parr, Wordsworth, Lamb, were all familiar at their fireside. Mr. Montagu is often pronounced a bore, because he perpetually quotes Bacon and the anci one of the most remarkable women I have ever known. Dr. Parr always called Mr. Montagu by his Christian name, Basil; and his wife, Basilissa; and their son, who w to a certain extent, for the abrupt character which it has. I once spoke of Mr. Montagu to Talfourd as a person whom I liked very much, when the author of on said: egation at Madrid; but its chief supporters were Parkes and Charles Austin and Montagu. It was established by the Radicals, to show that they were at least not igno
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
me in regretting that they have missed you, and in wishing you every happiness and prosperity upon your return to your own land. I shall always rejoice in hearing good news of your fortunes; and if ever you can return among us, I can assure you of a warm and hearty welcome. You have had better opportunities of seeing all classes of society, and all that is interesting among us, than any other of your countrymen, and I trust that your experience may not disincline you to revisit us. Mrs. Montagu wrote:— And now comes the saddest word that can be written,—farewell. We shall long and kindly remember you. You have made an impression on this country, equally honorable to England and to you.We have convinced you that we know how to value truth and dignified simplicity, and you have taught us to think much more highly of your country,—from which we have hitherto seen no such men. We can only desire you not to forget us entirely, but to let us hear that you are happy and well. M<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 24: Slavery and the law of nations.—1842.—Age, 31. (search)
nds a year, and lives surrounded by his tenantry. Mr. Blackett, who has called on you, is a country gentleman of moderate fortune, and the owner of a coal mine. He was for many years the M. P. for the County of Northumberland. Ingham is a person of warm and affectionate nature, and much attached to the Church. I hope you will mingle with people without taking part in politics. It is the privilege of a foreigner to mingle with all parties, without expressing sympathy with either. Mr. Basil Montagu is an old lawyer of remarkable attainments. He has written several works on professional topics, which have been republished in our country; but he is chiefly known as the illustrator of the works of Lord Bacon. He and his wife, a most remarkable person, were warm friends of mine. They were both bosom friends of Coleridge, Charles Lamb, and Dr. Parr, and will give you pleasant stories of them. You know Kenyon's intimacy with Coleridge. I think some of his sketches of Coleridge and
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, July 8, 1842. (search)
nds a year, and lives surrounded by his tenantry. Mr. Blackett, who has called on you, is a country gentleman of moderate fortune, and the owner of a coal mine. He was for many years the M. P. for the County of Northumberland. Ingham is a person of warm and affectionate nature, and much attached to the Church. I hope you will mingle with people without taking part in politics. It is the privilege of a foreigner to mingle with all parties, without expressing sympathy with either. Mr. Basil Montagu is an old lawyer of remarkable attainments. He has written several works on professional topics, which have been republished in our country; but he is chiefly known as the illustrator of the works of Lord Bacon. He and his wife, a most remarkable person, were warm friends of mine. They were both bosom friends of Coleridge, Charles Lamb, and Dr. Parr, and will give you pleasant stories of them. You know Kenyon's intimacy with Coleridge. I think some of his sketches of Coleridge and
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 25: service for Crawford.—The Somers Mutiny.—The nation's duty as to slavery.—1843.—Age, 32. (search)
en so good as to write me. Sumner had sent to his old friend, Mrs. Quincy, the wife of the President of Harvard University, a letter he had received from Mrs. Basil Montagu, which expressed the hope that, after having acquired a fortune, he would take up his residence in England; intimating that one of his character and attainmes. Ante, Vol. II, p. 160. Mrs. Quincy, in a note to him, reviewed in a pleasant way the literary and personal topics of the letter, dissenting, however, from Mrs. Montagu's implied depreciation of American society, and recalled the long friendship which the President and herself had cherished for him; and to her note the above i more than I can express by the assurances so warmly conveyed of your friendly interest in me. I can but say, in all sincerity, I am not worthy of all this. Mrs. Montagu, like most Europeans, sees our country from afar. She is not aware of the ample means of social and intellectual enjoyment offered in different parts of it. W
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