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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, chapter 30 (search)
s. While here he was gladdened by the arrival of Dr. Howe, who had been in Europe sixteen months, and who came at once to Pittsfield. Leaving Berkshire with strength renewed, he passed a few days in New York, where he met Crawford,—for the first time since their parting in Rome; and late in September became his brother Albert's guest at Newport,—his first visit to that resort. Here, rides on the beach with a fleet horse confirmed returning vigor. At this time he received a note from Mrs. Montagu, who wrote: That we should think of you and speak of you almost daily, and yet not tell you so, is an apparent perverseness which nothing can account for or excuse, except severe and unpleasant occupation. . . . I cannot account for the strange sympathy by which in a moment my heart acknowledges a friend; but with the feeling always of having known him before, I seem to hear a voice not new to me, and to meet looks and expressions of countenance so dear to me, and so responded to by every
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 41: search for health.—journey to Europe.—continued disability.—1857-1858. (search)
eminded of his disability by the sensitiveness in his spine, his inability to walk far, and weariness after exertion, he wrote, July 3, that he felt better than at any time since he was disabled. Some of his English friends had died,—among them Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu, John Kenyon, the first and second Lord Wharncliffe, and Sir Charles Vaughan; and Earl Fitzwilliam was on his death bed. But the greater number still survived. Of the English friends whom Sumner made in 1838-1840, only HeMrs. Basil Montagu, John Kenyon, the first and second Lord Wharncliffe, and Sir Charles Vaughan; and Earl Fitzwilliam was on his death bed. But the greater number still survived. Of the English friends whom Sumner made in 1838-1840, only Henry Reeve survives at this time (1892). They remembered him well as he came in his youth, and had followed his career. When they knew him first he was a youth of promise,—intelligent, aspiring, attractive in every way, but without any prestige of name or deeds; he came now with a fame equal to that of any whom he met, and with a record of devotion and suffering. Time had wrought changes also with them as with him. He wrote to Longfellow, June 26: The lapse of nineteen years is very plain in t
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 5: travel 1843-1844; aet. 24-25 (search)
Julia writes to her sister Louisa (June 17):-- I have said something,--I can hardly say enough, of the kindness we have received here. London seems already a home to us, and one surrounded by dear friends. Morpeth and his family, Rogers, Basil Montagu, and Sir R. H. Inglis have been our best friends. Travel Sydney Smith also has been kind to us; he calls Howe Prometheus, and says that he gave a soul to an inanimate body. For four mornings, we have not once breakfasted at home. Milnes g is about forty, looks young for that, drinks powerful tea, and then goes it strong upon all subjects, but without extravagancehe has a fine head, an earnest face, a glowing eye.... Furthermore, we have walked into the affections of the Hon. Basil Montagu, and Mrs. Basil--furthermore, Annie and I did went alone to a rout at Mrs. Sydney Smith's, and were announced, Mrs. 'Owe hand Miss Vord --did not know a soul, Annie frightened, I bored — got hold of some good people — made friends, drank ex
hell, Thomas, I, 10, 12. Modern Society, II, 60. Molloy, J. F., II, 171. Moltke, Count, Hellmuth, II, 20. Momery, Dr., II, 184. Money, trade in, I, 16. Monroe, Harriet, II, 251. Monson, I, 250. Mont Isabel, I, 322. Montagu, Basil, I, 81, 85. Montagu, Mrs., Basil, I, 85. Montgomery, Richard, I, 6. Montpelier, II, 68. Montreal, I, 38. Montreux, II, 176. Moore, Prof., II, 154. Moore, Rebecca, II, 170. Moore, Thomas, I, 87. Mormon Tabernacle, IIMontagu, Mrs., Basil, I, 85. Montgomery, Richard, I, 6. Montpelier, II, 68. Montreal, I, 38. Montreux, II, 176. Moore, Prof., II, 154. Moore, Rebecca, II, 170. Moore, Thomas, I, 87. Mormon Tabernacle, II, 137. Morpeth, see Carlisle, Earl of. Morris, Gouverneur, I, 7, 8. Morse, E. S., II, 169. Morse, William, II, 108. Mosby, John, II, 253. Mothers' Peace Day, I, 318, 319, 345. Mott, Lucretia, I, 285, 304; I, 108. Moulton, Louise C., II, 161, 169, 171, 273. Verse by, 335. Mounet-Sully, Jean, II, 195. Mt. Auburn, I, 183; II, 290, 294. Mt. Holyoke, I, 251. Mozart, W. A., I, 45; II, 351. Mozier, Joseph, I, 271. Mozumdar, II, 87. Munich, I, 278. Murray,
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