Your search returned 39 results in 15 document sections:

1 2
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Columbia University, (search)
separation of that part of Vermont from New York. In 1762 Rev. Myles Cooper was sent over by the Archbishop of Canterbury to become a fellow of the college. He was a strong loyalist, and had a pamphlet controversy with young Alexander Hamilton, one of his pupils. Cooper became president of the college, and so obnoxious were his politics that the college was attacked by the Sons of liberty and a mob in New York on the night of May 10, 1775, and he was obliged to flee for his life. Rev. Benjamin Moore (afterwards bishop of the diocese) succeeded him. The college was prepared for the reception of troops the next year, when the students were dispersed, the library and apparatus were stored in the City Hall, and mostly lost, and the building became a military hospital. About 600 of the volumes were recovered thirty years afterwards in a room in St. Paul's Chapel, when none but the sexton knew of their existence. In 1784 regents of a State University were appointed, who took charge o
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Cornwallis, Lord Charles 1738-1805 (search)
Washington took advantage of this good fortune, and suddenly moved his army from the Hudson to the James, and invested Yorktown with an overwhelming force. Finding escape impossible, and further resistance futile, Cornwallis sent a flag to Mrs. Moore's House. Washington, with a request that hostilities should be suspended for twenty-four hours, and that commissioners should be appointed on both sides to meet at Mrs. Moore's house, on the right of the American lines, to arrange terms for theMrs. Moore's house, on the right of the American lines, to arrange terms for the surrender of the post and the British army. Commissioners were accordingly appointed, the Americans being Col. John Laurens and Viscount de Noailles (a kinsman of Lafayette), and the British Lieutenant-Colonel Dundas and Major Ross. The terms agreed upon were honorable to both parties, and were signed on Oct. 19, 1781. They provided for the surrender of Cornwallis as a prisoner of war, with all his troops, and all public property as spoils of victory. All slaves and plunder found in posses
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Currency, Continental (search)
s notes for the price of the paper per ream. They are so neatly and exactly executed that there is no risk in getting them off, it being almost impossible to discover that they are not genuine. This has been proven by bills to a very large amount which have already been successfully circulated. Inquire of Q. E. D., at the Coffee-house, from 11 A. M. to 4 P. M., during the present month. An ill-advised expedition against the Spaniards at St. Augustine, by land and sea, undertaken by Governor Moore, of South Carolina, in September, 1702, was unsuccessful, and involved the colony in a debt of more than $26,000, for the payment of which bills of credit were issued, the first emission of paper money in that colony. In 1723 Pennsylvania made its first issue of paper currency. It issued, in March, paper bills of credit to the amount of $60,000, made them a legal tender in all payments on pain of confiscating the debt or forfeiting the commodity, imposed sufficient penalties on all p
il, b. 1 May 1728, m. Samuel Hodgman of Western (now Warren) 7 May 1755; David, b. 15 July 1730, m. Dorcas Reed of, Lex. and rem. to Western; Joseph, b. 31 May 1733,m. Rebecca Howe of Lincoln, who d. and he m. Mary Reed of Western, to which town he rem.; Isaac, b. June 1736, d. Jan. 1737; Mary, b. 12 Aug. 1738, m. John Paige of Hardwick 15 Sept. 1758,; Solomon, b. 15 May 1740, m. Rebecca, a Paige of Bedford; Thomas, b. 5 May 1742, m. Abigail Reed of Western; Elizabeth, b. 5 Aug. 1745, m. Benjamin Moore of Lex. 3 May 1768; Amittai, b. 15 July 1748, m. Nathan Leonard of Hardwick 6 Nov. 1766. David the f. d. of small-pox 5 Dec. 1760; his w. Mary d. 25 May 1797, a. 93. 9. James, s. of James (7), m. Abigail, dau. of Henry Dunster (pub. 29 Oct. 1737), and had James, b. 30 May 1741; Abigail, b. 22 Sept. 1742; Alice, b. 16 April 1715; Martha, b. 14 July 1746; Henry, b. 10 May 1748; Betty, b. 12 May 1750, d. 24 July 1754; Sarah, b. 1 Feb. 1753, d. 30 July 1754; William, b. 11 April 1755.
il, b. 1 May 1728, m. Samuel Hodgman of Western (now Warren) 7 May 1755; David, b. 15 July 1730, m. Dorcas Reed of, Lex. and rem. to Western; Joseph, b. 31 May 1733,m. Rebecca Howe of Lincoln, who d. and he m. Mary Reed of Western, to which town he rem.; Isaac, b. June 1736, d. Jan. 1737; Mary, b. 12 Aug. 1738, m. John Paige of Hardwick 15 Sept. 1758,; Solomon, b. 15 May 1740, m. Rebecca, a Paige of Bedford; Thomas, b. 5 May 1742, m. Abigail Reed of Western; Elizabeth, b. 5 Aug. 1745, m. Benjamin Moore of Lex. 3 May 1768; Amittai, b. 15 July 1748, m. Nathan Leonard of Hardwick 6 Nov. 1766. David the f. d. of small-pox 5 Dec. 1760; his w. Mary d. 25 May 1797, a. 93. 9. James, s. of James (7), m. Abigail, dau. of Henry Dunster (pub. 29 Oct. 1737), and had James, b. 30 May 1741; Abigail, b. 22 Sept. 1742; Alice, b. 16 April 1715; Martha, b. 14 July 1746; Henry, b. 10 May 1748; Betty, b. 12 May 1750, d. 24 July 1754; Sarah, b. 1 Feb. 1753, d. 30 July 1754; William, b. 11 April 1755.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Paroles of the Army of Northern Virginia. (search)
unter, G. W. Kinard, D. B. Kinard, J. Kinard, G. J. Lee, R. B. Lyons, S. J. Long, R. J. Riggins, G. W. Shillingslaw, E. S. Sligh, H. M. W. Glymph, E. D. Fry, W. M. Wicker, G. H. Stokes. Co. E. Sergeant J. A. Sanders, M. S. Lindsay, J. M. Kirkpatrick, J. A. Brandon, H. H. Grant, Private J. M. Grant, W. T. Grant, J. G. Hethrington, W. A. Isom, R. McConnell, Corporal Wm. Brown, J. S. Alexander, Private W. E. Bratton, W. W. Carson, J. T. Coin, T. J. Coin, Private Benj. Moore, D. Pearson, M. Rawls, W. Rawls, R. B. Thomas. Co. F. Sergeant John Knox, S. J. Havey, Corporal M. L. Thomason, R. B. Glenn, Private J. R. Barber, J. M. Barnett, N. B. Campbell, W. B. Davison, J. C. Farris, J. U. Gardner, J. A. Gordon, E. A. Gettys, Wm. Hardin, Private D. J. Homey, R. B. Harvy, W. A. Jeffries, E. R. Johnson, D. McSwain, J. H. Neely, C. M. Parrott, W. E. Sutton, E. C. Sutton, J. L. Stuart, Robt. Shaw, W. B. Whitaker, J. B. Robison. C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 15. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Semmes' Georgia Brigade. (search)
ler, J. R. Williamson, (Act. Adj't 26th Regiment.) Co. F. Sergeant John Cleland, Corporal John W. Thompson Private Geo. F. Ager, A. M. Goethe, Private Lem. Johnson, (drummer), S. D. Johnson, (pioneer), A. E. Smith, H. Sauls, Private H. W. Odem, W. H. Rivers, Private Newton Sweat, Gideon Hays. Co. G. Sergeant R. Robinson, Private L. A. Stokes, Private Henry Clark. Co H. Sergeant Martin G. Knight, (Provost Guard), Private W. G. Bostic, J. E. Gluner, Private B. Moore, R. W. Main, (Ambulance Corps), J. M. Wilson. Co. I. Corporal J. M. Howell, Private James Barrentine, Daniel Blackshear, Wm. Liles, B. Vinson, Private R. McConnell, S. Wall, R. A. Taylor, John Hill, (Wagon Master). Co. K. Sergeant Allen Box, Corporal J. E. Kite, Private John Carmichael, D. C. Carmichael, A. C. Johnson, (Provost Guard), Private J. M. Kite, W. H. Reland, D. M. Ribron, J. R. Rowell, R. Wilds. I certify, on honor, that of the above number of
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 4., Some Unpublished School reports. (search)
d so considerably that it has been necessary to provide additional accommodations in some of the schoolrooms; and these are still too small for convenience & comfort. The number of pupils is at present, In the High School 75 East Grammar School East Primary School Centre Grammar School South Primary School West Primary School. During the last year the Committee have been obliged to make several alterations in School houses in order to accommodate the constantly increasing numbers of Scholars. And they would suggest that some of them are too small for convenience and comfort. To meet the expenses of the Schools for the present year the Committee recommend the appropriation of $3,200. All which is respectfully submitted. Alexander Gregg, School Committee. C. Stetson, School Committee. H. Ballou, 2d, School Committee. Jos. W. Mitchell, School Committee. Benj. Moore, School Committee. John W. Bacon, School Committee. A. R. Baker. School Committee. Medford, March 7, 1842.
the newly elected lieutenant or somebody else. From this time until the Light Guard went to the front this mysterious somebody furnished several suppers after drills, and we suspect that to this day he is the good genius of the company. Private Benjamin Moore at this time presented a splendid roll board, and after three cheers and a lemon (I quote from the records) for Private Moore, the meeting adjourned. This roll board is still in the possession of the company, although few of the present Private Moore, the meeting adjourned. This roll board is still in the possession of the company, although few of the present members know its history. It is made with spaces for inserting cards bearing the names of the members, which were removed as resignations were accepted. The militia rolls were not kept with the formality that they are now, and the old rosters are lost because they never existed in permanent form. In March, 1861, regimental drills were begun, which were held regularly until the beginning of the war, in Fitchburg Hall, Boston. Medford was blessed in those days with only one late train a wee
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 6., The Lawrence Light Guard.—Continued. (search)
hey were wound around the barrels, responsive to the sturdy muscles of the blacksmiths, Wait and Moore, and their men, was a common sound. Above the bridge were three ship yards, one lumber yard, t fire of 1850 began. When Mr. Gregg took possession of the northern half of James' yard, Mr. Benjamin Moore moved his blacksmith shop from the other side of the street to the southerly part of the yard, and his family moved from Union street to the Joseph James house. Mr. Moore, in company with John Fall, a shipsmith, and J. T. Barker, a teamster, took the teaming business of Mr. Gregg afterd at West Medford. Mr. James Winneck succeeded him in the grocery business. Next south of Mr. Moore's property was a dwelling house occupied by the family of Mrs. Daniel Symmes, and by William Bd on his father's blacksmith business in a shop next to the house. There was a pump between Mr. Moore's house and the Symmes' house, which, with two others, furnished all the water used by familie
1 2