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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 44 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 23 3 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
y 17. No. 107Capt. lyman M. Kellogg, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, of operations June 14-September 1. No. 108Capt. Robert B. Hull, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry. No. 109Capt. William J. Fetterman, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, commanding Second Battalion, of operations May 4-July 5. No. 110Capt. James Mooney, Nineteenth U. S. Infantry, commanding First Battalion. No. 111Col. Benjamin F. Scribner, Thirty-eighth Indiana Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations May 7-July 5. No. 112Col. Marshall F. Moore, Sixty-ninth Ohio Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, of operations July 15-September 8. No. 113Lieut. Col. Willian D. Ward, Thirty-seventh Indiana Infantry. No. 114Maj. Thomas V. Kimble, Thirty-seventh Indiana Infantry, of operations May 27-June 6. No. 115Lieut. Col. Daniel F. Griffin, Thirty-eighth Indiana Infantry. No. 116Lieut. Col. Arnold McMahan, Twenty-first Ohio Infantry. No. 117Col. Josiah Given, Seventy-fourth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 7-July 5 and August 16-Sep
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 23 (search)
he killed, wounded, and missing: May the 3d the brigade-composed of the following regiments, Twenty-first Kentucky, Colonel Price; Ninety-sixth Illinois, Colonel Champion; Fortieth Ohio, Colonel Taylor; One hundred and fifteenth Illinois, Colonel Moore; Fifty-first Ohio, Colonel Mc-Clain; Ninety-ninth Ohio, Lieutenant-Colonel Cummins commanding; Eighty-fourth Indiana, Col. A. J. Neff, and Thirty-fifth Indiana. Major Dufficy commanding, and the Fifth Indiana Battery, Lieut. A. Morrison commacting under heavy fire. Early next morning, the 16th, the enemy's works were found to be evacuated. We slowly pursued them, and, passing through Resaca, crossed the Oostenaula late in the evening. The One hundred and fifteenth Illinois, Colonel Moore commanding, was detailed, by order of General Thomas, to guard the works at Resaca. It was a very responsible position, and it has been well done. May 17, we moved slowly in the direction of and within three miles of Adairsville, the enemy
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 93 (search)
y during the temporary pause in the advance, did but little damage, but served to locate the enemy's lines more definitely, which, owing to the dense thicket intervening, could not be well defined. The attack was promptly and vigorously made along the whole line. The enemy, self-confident and exultant at our audacity in attacking lines thus defended, made a most determined resistance. The fight was short and bloody. The entire line of works was carried, except the extreme left, formed of Moore's brigade. Here from natural obstructions, heavy timber, and underbrush, as well as a severe fire from his left, coming from the opposite side of the railroad, this brigade operated under great disadvantage, and was for awhile held in check, notwithstanding the troops fought with great gallantry and were well handled. Elsewhere, at all points, the assault was decisive and complete along the entire line. Eight hundred and sixty-five officers and men surrendered themselves in the works. Ab
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 95 (search)
red during the hottest of the fight by Captain Edmonds, Ninety-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry; Capt. 4. W. Smith, Eighteenth U. S. Infantry, and Lieut. W. B. Roby, Thirty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and Lieut. George H. Tracy, all of my staff. Dr. Solon Marks, chief surgeon of the division; Lieut. H. G. Litchfield, ordnance officer, and Lieut. W. R. Maize, in charge of ambulances, are deserving of mention for the faithful performance of their duties in their respective departments. Col. M. F. Moore, Sixty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, commanding Third Brigade, deserves special mention for the promptness with which he always obeyed orders, and put his command in motion. The staff officers of the Second Brigade, Captain Mills, Lieutenant Estes, and Lieutenant St. Onge, and especially Capt. W. J. Fetterman, acting assistant adjutant-general of the brigade, displayed great gallantry and spirit in assisting Maj. J. R. Edie, Fifteenth Infantry, in advancing the brigade. The regimenta
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 104 (search)
de remained in this position till the 11th, when it was moved back about half a mile to get out of range of the rebel guns, some small loss having been sustained from their fire. On the 11th the Sixty-ninth Regiment Ohio Veteran Volunteers, Col. M. F. Moore, having returned from its veteran furlough, rejoined the brigade with 23 officers and 324 men. On the 12th broke up camp at daylight and marched for Snake Creek Gap, which point we reached after night-fall, and bivouacked till morning. On tder severe and destructive fire, losing in killed and wounded some 50 men. On the latter day Colonel Stoughton, commanding the brigade, was severely wounded in the leg by a piece of shell. He was sent to the rear, and the command assumed by Col. M. F. Moore, Sixty-ninth Ohio Volunteers, who retained it until General King returned to the brigade on the 13th of July. The troops behaved with coolness and bravery on both these days, and on the 4th succeeded in dislodging the enemy from their rifle
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 105 (search)
eport of Lieut. Col. Joseph H. Brigham, Sixty-ninth Ohio Infantry, of operations May 8-August 25. Hdqrs. Sixty-Ninth Ohio Vet. Vol. Infantry, Atlanta, Ga., September 10, 1864. The Sixty-ninth Regiment Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, Col. M. F. Moore in command, reached Chattanooga, Tenn., on the 8th day of May, 1864, on return from veteran furlough. May 9, started for the front to join brigade; camped in Rossville, Ga., same night. Next day marched two miles beyond Ringgold, Ga., aking 35 prisoners, and drove the enemy a quarter of a mile. The regiment halted and threw up earth-works. On the morning of July 22 the command moved forward to within two and a half miles of Atlanta, Ga., and remained in front of the city until the 25th day of August, 1864. Lieutenant-Colonel Brigham was in command of the regiment from the 13th day of May to, the 25th day of August, 1864, Col. M. F. Moore having assumed command of the brigade. J. H. Brigham, Lieutenant-Colonel Commanding.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 109 (search)
eld without flinching for over half an hour, the Sixteenth stubbornly clinging to its position even after the troops on its right had given way temporarily, repulsing also a charge then made by the enemy to dislodge it. About 5 p. m. a portion of Moore's (Third) brigade relieved us, when the battalion quietly reformed and marched in perfect order down the slope, forming line on the left of the brigade again. At dark we moved forward and threw up works on the right of Moore's brigade. The offiMoore's brigade. The officers and men of this regiment deserve great praise. After a long march in the morning, they skirmished for several hours, driving the enemy miles, continually charging at a double-quick, then, without rest or food, forming line of battle and charging the enemy through a dense thicket and over a wide field, driving back the rebels and stubbornly holding the position thus gained, though without support part of the time either on right or left. All deserve praise, but it will not prove invidious
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 115 (search)
we found no enemy in our front. On the 6th General Johnson assumed command again. We now moved to the left toward Acworth, and were again in communication with the railroad. On the 10th we advanced with the army. The 11th and 12th were occupied with short marches, reconnoitering, and building breast-works. On the 13th General Johnson, still suffering from the effects of his bruise, relinquished command. Accompanying this I send list of casualties. Not found; but see statement with Moore's report, p. 604. Respectfully, your obedient servant, B. F. Scribner, Colonel Thirty-eighth Indiana, Commanding Brigade. Captain Edmonds. New Albany, August 7, 1864. Lieutenant: I have the honor to report the operations of my command from June 14 to July 6, inclusive. On the morning of the 14th we advanced in line of battle toward the Marietta road, the objective point being Pine Mountain, upon which the enemy had fortifications and artillery. After a difficult and circ
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 116 (search)
No. 112. reports of Col. Marshall F. Moore, Sixty-ninth Ohio Infantry, commanding Third brigade, of operations July 15-September 8. Hdqrs. Third Brig., First Div., 14TH Army Corps, Jonesborough, Ga., September 3, 1864. Captain: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by my brigade in the battle near Jonesborough, Ga., on Thursday, September 1, 1864: On the morning of that day the First Division, Fourteenth Army Corps, moved down the Atlanta and Jonesborough road, my brigade having the advance. After passing the right of the Army of the Cumberland, directed by the general commanding the division, the Sixty-ninth Ohio, Captain Hicks, was deployed on our front and left flank as shirmishers. Upon connecting with the left of the Army of the Tennessee, I was directed to make a reconnaissance in the direction of the railroad, something more than a mile distant. The Seventy-fourth Ohio, Colonel Given, was thrown forward as skirmishers, and the briga
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 119 (search)
ver. On this date, Colonel Scribner having been taken quite sick, the command of the brigade devolved upon Colonel Given, Seventy-fourth Ohio Veteran Volunteers. July 9, the regiment supported the Twenty-first Ohio Veteran Volunteers in advancing the skirmish line north of the Chattahoochee River, where a spirited and gallant affair ensued, the Twentyfirst charging and carrying the enemy's rifle-pits, the Thirty-eighth, as a reserve, losing 5 wounded during the affray. July 15, Col. M. F. Moore, Sixty-ninth Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, having been assigned to the command of the brigade and subsequent operations of the regiment coming under your personal observation, I shall be as brief as possible. July 17, crossed the Chattahoochee River near Vining's Station, .advancing and participating in the skirmish from that point to the crossing of Nancy's and Peach Tree Creeks. On the 20th was in the front line during the engagement of that day, losing 1 captain and 4 enliste
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