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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Siege and capture of Fort Pulaski. (search)
t I trust I have not disgraced it. . . . . Major Halpine, in reply, spoke gracefully of the painfulness of the duty he had been called upon to perform — to receive the swords of men who had shown by their bravery that they deserved to wear them. . . . As soon as the surrender was complete, Colonel Olmstead turned to his officers and began making some remarks to them, upon which his captors withdrew. The American flag was then raised on the ramparts. [Correspondence of the New York times in Moore's Rebellion record. ] Editors. Many a jest and repartee passed between them. One Georgian, of a sarcastic bent, recalled the ancient myth of wooden nutmegs. We don't make them of wood any longer, retorted a Connecticut man, pointing to a 10-inch shot that one of our Columbiads had sent through the wall. Among the articles of capitulation was one providing that the sick and wounded should be sent under a flag of truce to the Confederate lines. This article General Hunter declined to rat
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces in the operations at New Orleans, La. (search)
uding Howitzers. naval vessels.                   Louisiana, Comr. Charles F. McIntosh (m w) 2 3 4 7         16 McRae, Lieut, Thos. B. Huger (m w)   1     6   1 Experimental gun.   8 Jackson (at Quarantine), Lieut. F. B. Renshaw         2       2 Manassas, Lieut. A. F. Warley         1 Carronade.       1 Launch No. 3, Acting Master Telford               1 1 Launch No. 6, Acting Master Fairbanks               1 1 Louisiana State Gun-boats                   Governor Moore, Lieut. Beverley Kennon       2         2 General Quitman, Capt. Alexander Grant         2       2 River Defense Boats.                   Warrior, Capt. John A. Stephenson         1       1 Stonewall Jackson, Capt. Geo. W. Philips           1     1 Defiance, Capt. Joseph D. McCoy         1       1 Resolute, Capt. Isaac Hooper       1 1       2 General Lovell, Capt. Burde
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Fighting Farragut below New Orleans. (search)
of them had their Lieutenant Beverley Kennon, C. S. N., Commander of the Governor Moore. from a photograph. boiler-houses, engines, and boilers protected by a bulquarter, delivered her fire, Firing at the Varuna through the bow of the Governor Moore. killing 5 men in our bunkers. This combined attack killed and wounded ae shot away; the latter fell on the cylinder The Pensacola disabling the Governor Moore. Captain H. W. Morris of the Pensacola says, in his report: The ram [GovGovernor Moore], after having struck the Varuna gun-boat, and forced her to run on shore to prevent sinking, advanced to attach this ship, coming down on us right ahead.ame alongside, and took them and myself off the burning ship. When I The Governor Moore, at the end of the fight. The Governor Moore in flames. The Union shiGovernor Moore in flames. The Union ships in their order, beginning with the left, are the Oneida, the Pinola, the sunken Varuna, the Iroquois, and, in the foreground, the Pensacola. [See note concerning
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Ball's Bluff and the arrest of General Stone. (search)
my before and since the battle of Ball's Bluff, and receiving visits from rebel officers in his camp; third, for treacherously suffering the enemy to build a fort or strong work, since the battle of Ball's Bluff, under his guns without molestation; fourth, for a treacherous design to expose his force to capture and destruction by the enemy, under pretense of orders for a movement from the commanding general, which had not been given.--[ Diary of events for February 9th, 1861, in Vol. IV. of Moore's Rebellion record, published in 1862.] These few lines involve nine distinct misstatements or perversions, only the single fact embodied in the first paragraph being correctly set forth.--R. B. I. General Stone asked his commanding general for a court of inquiry; it was refused as unnecessary and inexpedient. Congress met and promptly called on the Executive for information and an investigation. Both requests were denied as contrary to the public interests, but the demand being repe
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
ar, in command of the army. The operations of the Confederate troops in this battle were very much retarded by the broad ponds of rain-water,--in many places more than knee-deep,--by the deep mud, and by the dense woods and thickets that covered the ground. Brigadier-General Hatton was among the killed, and Brigadier-Generals Pettigrew and Hampton were severely wounded. The latter kept his saddle, and served to the end of the action. Among the killed on the Williamsburg road were Colonels Moore, of Alabama, Jones, and Lomax. In the two days battle, the Confederate loss, so far as the reports indicate, was 6134 (including the loss in G. W. Smith's division, which was 1283); and the Federal loss, according to the revised returns, was 5031. Prisoners to the number of 350, 10 pieces of artillery, 6700 muskets and rifles in excellent condition, a garrison flag and 4 regimental colors, medical, commissary, quartermaster and ordnance stores, tents and sutler's property, were captu
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Iuka and Corinth. (search)
5; m, 40 = 408. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Martin E. Green: 7th Miss. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. S. Terral; 43d Miss., Col. W. H. Moore; 4th Mo., Col. A. MacFarlane: 6th Mo., Col. Eugene Erwin; 3d Mo. (dismounted cavalry),----; Mo. Battery, Capt. Henryery, Capt. William E. Dawson. Brigade loss: k, 11; w, 129; m, 132 = 272. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Martin E. Green, Col. W. H. Moore (w): 7th Miss. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. S. Terral (w); 43d Miss., Col. W. H. Moore; 4th Mo., Col. A. MacFarlane; 6tCol. W. H. Moore; 4th Mo., Col. A. MacFarlane; 6th Mo., Col. Eugene Erwin (w); 3d Mo. Cav., (dismounted),----; Mo. Battery, Capt. Henry Guibor; Mo. Battery, Capt. John C. Landis. Brigade loss: k, 77; w, 369; m, 302 = 748. Fourth Brigade, Col. John D. Martin (m w), Col. Robert McLain (w); 37th Ala.d to this brigade not identified.) Brigade loss; k, 41; w, 203 = 244. Maury's division, Brig.-Gen. Dabney H. Maury. Moore's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Moore: 42d Ala., Col. John W. Portis; 15th Ark., Lieut.-Col. Squire Boone; 23d Ark., Lieut.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The opposing forces at Corinth, Miss., October 3d and 4th, 1862. (search)
, Lieut. J. L. Faris; St. Louis (Mo.)Battery, Capt. William E. Dawson. Brigade loss: k, 11; w, 129; m, 132 = 272. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Martin E. Green, Col. W. H. Moore (w): 7th Miss. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. J. S. Terral (w); 43d Miss., Col. W. H. Moore; 4th Mo., Col. A. MacFarlane; 6th Mo., Col. Eugene Erwin (w); 3d Mo. Cav.Col. W. H. Moore; 4th Mo., Col. A. MacFarlane; 6th Mo., Col. Eugene Erwin (w); 3d Mo. Cav., (dismounted),----; Mo. Battery, Capt. Henry Guibor; Mo. Battery, Capt. John C. Landis. Brigade loss: k, 77; w, 369; m, 302 = 748. Fourth Brigade, Col. John D. Martin (m w), Col. Robert McLain (w); 37th Ala.; 36th Miss., Col. W. W. Witherspoon; 37th Miss., Col. Robert McLain; 38th Miss., Col. F. W. Adams. (Battery attached to this brigade not identified.) Brigade loss; k, 41; w, 203 = 244. Maury's division, Brig.-Gen. Dabney H. Maury. Moore's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. John C. Moore: 42d Ala., Col. John W. Portis; 15th Ark., Lieut.-Col. Squire Boone; 23d Ark., Lieut.-Col. A. A. Pennington; 35th Miss., Col. William S. Barry; 2d Tex., Col. W. P. Rogers (k);
fantryCol. Orlando HollandOct. 4, 1862.  Col. Robert McLain   38thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. F. W. Adams   39thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. W. B. ShelbyMay 13, 1862.  40thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. W. B. ColbertMay 14, 1862.  41stMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. W. F. TuckerMay 8, 1862.Promoted Brigadier-General. 42dMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. Hugh R. MillerMay 14, 1862.  43dMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. Richard HarrisonNov. 9, 1862.Promoted Brigadier-General. Col. W. H. Moore   44thMississippiRegimentInfantry    45thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. A. B. Hardcastle   46thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. C. W. SearsDec. 11, 1862.Promoted Brigadier-General. 47thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. James Jordan   48thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. James M. JayneJan. 17, 1863.  49thMississippiRegimentInfantryCol. Jno. W. Balfour   1stMississippiJeff. Davis' Leg'nCavalry, &cLt. Col. Martin   2dMississippiWirt Adams' Leg'nCavalry, &cCol. Wirt Adam
no shape to immediately renew the fight. The retreat was continued on the 5th to Davis' bridge on the Hatchie, but the bridge was found in the hands of Hurlbut. Moore's brigade, now but 300 men, was thrown across, but the enemy was strongly posted and Moore, reinforced by Phifer, was swept back over the bridge, losing four guns.Moore, reinforced by Phifer, was swept back over the bridge, losing four guns. All that Maury's division, reinforced by Villepigue, could do, was to check the enemy's advance until Van Dorn could find another crossing place. If Rosecrans had promptly followed Van Dorn, as ordered by Grant, the Confederate army could hardly have escaped. He did set out on the 5th, with McPherson's fresh brigade in advance,isputed by Hurlbut's corps, 12,000 strong, which had marched across from Bolivar and reached Pocahontas before us. The bridge was about two miles from Pocahontas. Moore's and Phifer's remnants of brigades crossed and were again gobbled up, and we lost one battery. The rest of the division got up and, though greatly exhausted, man
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
of August the battery was attached to Preston's battalion of reserve artillery, and on the 5th of September, ordered to Demopolis, Alabama, for repairs. In new uniforms, well dressed, well drilled, and well equipped, on the 12th of October the battery took part in a review had for General Johnston, and was chosen to fire a salute of eleven guns in his honor; as also one afterwards on the 15th, in honor of the arrival of President Davis. At this place an effort was made to consolidate Moore's and Ritter's sections, but it failed, as the sequel will show. Lieutenant Ritter had now been on detached service for some time, and being anxious to return to his old command, on the 2d August, 1863, he wrote to Brigadier-General A. W. Reynolds, and also to Major-General Carter L. Stevenson, asking their influence to that end. He made an application likewise to General Joseph E. Johnston, sending it through the regular channel. He heard from none of these except the one sent to General
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