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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 12 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 66 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 65 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 35 5 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 32 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for George W. Morgan or search for George W. Morgan in all documents.

Your search returned 39 results in 10 document sections:

Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
showed 108,538 present for duty. A division reporting 8682 for duty, under the Federal General George W. Morgan, was at Cumberland Gap; a division with 6411 for duty, under General Ormsby M. Mitchel, dated July 14th, 1862, estimated Stevenson's division at 10,000, Heth's and McCown's at 10,000, Morgan's cavalry 1300. Official Records, Vol. XVI., Pt. II., p. 727.--editors. Forrest and John H. Mor General C. L. Stevenson, with nearly nine thousand men, was ordered to watch the Federal General G. W. Morgan, who occupied Cumberland Gap. General Smith started on the 14th en route to Rogers's Gap,rate supplies, arouse the people, and raise and organize troops for the Confederacy. General George W. Morgan (Federal), who was left at Cumberland Gap with 8682 men, seeing these active movements 00 Collected at Louisville30,000 Carried to Louisville by Buell, September 25th to 29th54,198 Morgan's Seventh Division8,084   Total under Buell's and Wright's command137,282 But see other est
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's cavalry during the Bragg invasion. (search)
assistance of General Marshall in the mountains of eastern Kentucky. The Federal general, George W. Morgan, had evacuated Cumberland Gap, and followed by Stevenson, who had been instructed to observe and pursue him if he moved, was making his way to the Ohio. It was intended that Marshall and Morgan should intercept and arrest his march until Stevenson could overtake him and attack him in rear. sent to eastern Kentucky, as I have said, to intercept the retreat of the Federal general, George W. Morgan. He did not find Marshall in the vicinity where he was instructed to seek him, nor, indeed from Manchester via Booneville to Mount Sterling, doubtless to reach the Ohio at Maysville, Colonel Morgan expected to strike the enemy between Booneville and Mount Sterling. But General Morgan concGeneral Morgan concentrated at Irvine on the 21 st, and moved toward Proctor. The Confederate cavalry then moved as rapidly as the mountainous country permitted, and receiving further information that the enemy had tur
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
extremely difficult ground that must at first be overcome by wagon transportation after crossing. It would establish a junction promptly with the force under G. W. Morgan operating against Cumberland Gap, and give actual possession of east Tennessee, which the mere occupation of Chattanooga would not. Halleck at first assented tntations of the necessity of opening the road to Nashville were answered with orders from Washington to first open communication with Cumberland Gap, where General G. W. Morgan was not in danger, and had abundant supplies for the present. The result of those orders, unnecessary for the relief of Morgan, and insufficient for stopption which was before me. My instructions of the 18th Brigadier-General William R. Terrill, killed at Perryville. From a photograph. of March placed General G. W. Morgan in command of the Seventh division of the army, to operate in the Cumberland Gap road from Kentucky to east Tennessee, and required him to take the Gap if
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Cumberland Gap. (search)
Cumberland Gap. by George W. Morgan, Brigadier-General, U. S. V. On the 11th of April, 1862, with the Seventh Division of the Army of the Ohio under my command, I arrived at Cumberland Ford with orders from General Buell to take Cumberland Gap, On the morning of May 22d I sent forward the brigade of De Courcy, with a battery, with orders to occupy Brigadier-General George W. Morgan. From a photograph. the defile, and, as a stratagem intended to puzzle Smith, to construct a fort at the pposing forces at Cumberland Gap, June 17th--18th, 1862. Union forces.--Seventh division, army of the Ohio. Brig.-Gen. George W. Morgan. Twenty-fourth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Samuel P. Carter: 49th Ind., Lieut.-Col. James Keigwin; 3d Ky., Col. T. e month of July Brig.-Gen. Carter L. Stevenson, First Division, Department of East Tennessee, was in position confronting Morgan at Cumberland Gap. The strength of this division was stated by General Kirby Smith on the 24th of the month to be 9000 e
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 2.15 (search)
e unfinished railroad. I could see them being dreadfully cut up, although they had not advanced as far as our men. I determined to send a battery upon the plain to shell the line that was doing them so much harm; so I ordered an aide.to tell Colonel Morgan to send a battery across the canal and plant it near the brick house. Morgan came to me and said: General, a battery can't live there. I replied, Then it must die there! Hazard took his battery out in gallant style and opened fire on theMorgan came to me and said: General, a battery can't live there. I replied, Then it must die there! Hazard took his battery out in gallant style and opened fire on the enemy's lines to the left of the Marye House. Men never fought more gallantly, and he lost a great many men and horses. When Hooker came he ordered Frank's battery to join Hazard. But this last effort did not last long. In the midst of it I rode to the brick house, accompanied by Colonel Francis A. Walker, Lieutenant Cushing, and my orderly, Long. The smoke lay so thick that we could not see the enemy, and I think they could not see us, but we were aware The Ninth Corps crossing by the
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 5.63 (search)
0th of December broke up General Grant's cooperating movement by land. Sherman, knowing nothing of the enforced change of Grant's plans, attacked alone the reinforced garrison of Vicksburg, at Chickasaw's Bluffs, and was repulsed with heavy loss. [See p. 462.] The following day, January 4th, General McClernand arrived and took command of the expedition, to which he gave the name of the Army of the Mississippi, dividing it into two corps, commanded by Major-General Sherman and Brigadier-General George W. Morgan. Without waiting for further instructions, McClernand at once moved up the Arkansas River and captured the works known as Arkansas Post, with about five thousand prisoners. Grant at first disapproved of the movement as having been made without orders. McClernand, however, considered himself an independent commander. All question as to McClernand's position disappeared in the reorganization of the forces under General Grant, December 18th, 1862, into four army corps: the Thir
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces in Arkansas, December 7th, 1862--September 14th, 1863. (search)
, p. 140) that he had for the fight less than 10,000 men of all arms. He also (ibid, p. 142) reports his loss as 164 killed, 817 wounded, and 336 missing = 1317. Arkansas Post (Fort Hindman), January 11th, 1863. Union: army of the Mississippi. so styled, provisionally, by General McClernand, the Thirteenth army Corps being designated as the First, and the Fifteenth army Corps as the Second Corps of said army.--Major-General John A. McOlernand. Thirteenth Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. George W. Morgan. Escort: A, 3d Ill. Cav., Capt. Richard H. Ballinger. First division, Brig.-Gen. Andrew J. Smith. Escort: C, 4th Ind. Cav., Capt. Joseph P. Lesslie. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Stephen G. Burbridge: 16th Ind., Lieut.-Col. John M. Orr (w), Maj. James H. Redfield, Col. Thomas J. Lucas; 60th Ind., Col. Richard Owen; 67th Ind., Col. Frank Emerson (w); 83d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. William H. Baldwin; 96th Ohio, Col. Joseph W. Vance; 23d Wis., Col. Joshua J. Guppey. Brigade loss: k, 37;
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The assault on Chickasaw bluffs. (search)
The assault on Chickasaw bluffs. by George W. Morgan, Brigadier-General, U. S. V. President Liner-Generals A. J. Smith, Morgan L. Smith, George W. Morgan, and Frederick Steele. The entire force oad leading to Snyder's Mills, form in rear of Morgan, and give him such support as he might ask ford been ordered by General Sherman to report to Morgan, and was sent by him across the bayou and over sand-bar, or dry lake, while the divisions of Morgan and Steele would have held Lee at Chickasaw. ade [Thayer's] and sub-sequently to render General Morgan any assistance he might ask for. General MGeneral Morgan finally told me that he was going to storm the heights without waiting for the completion of terman, and would give me his exact words: Tell Morgan to give the signal for the assault; that we wihis Memoirs, Vol. I., p. 292: Had he [General Morgan] used with skill and boldness one of his bemoirs, that one brigade (De Courcy's), of Morgan's troops, crossed the bayou, but took to cover[3 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Chickasaw bluffs (or First Vicksburg), Miss.: December 27th, 1862--January 3d, 1863. (search)
th: 55th Ill., Lieut.-Col. Oscar Malmborg; 127th Ill., Col. John Van Arman; 83d Ind., Col. Benjamin J. Spooner; 54th Ohio, Col. T. Kilby Smith; 57th Ohio, Col. William Mungen. Brigade loss: k, 12; w. 39; m, 6 == 57. Third division, Brig.-Gen. George W. Morgan. First Brigade, Col. Lionel A. Sheldon: 118th Ill., Col. John G. Fonda; 69th Ind., Col. Thomas W. Bennett; 120th Ohio, Col. Daniel French. Brigade loss: w, 27; m, 2 ==29. Second Brigade, Col. Daniel W. Lindsey: 49th Ind., Col. James Kand 563 captured or missing == 1776. The effective strength of the expeditionary force is estimated at about 33,000 men. General Sherman says ( Official Records, Vol. XVII., Part I., p. 610) that the only real fighting was during the assault by Morgan's and Steele's divisions, and at the time of crossing the 6th Missouri, during the afternoon of December 29th, by the Second Division. The Confederate forces. Lieutenant-General John C. Pemberton. defenses of Vicksburg, Major-General Mart
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
e 30th Major-General Kirby Smith visited General Bragg at that point, and it was arranged that Smith should move at once against the Federal forces under General George W. Morgan in Cumberland Gap. In this interview General Bragg was very certain that he would begin his forward move in ten or fifteen days at latest, and if Kirby Smith was successful in his operation against Morgan he would be on his offensive against Buell. Kirby Smith took the field on the 13th of August, 1862. On the 28th, after some inevitable delays, Bragg crossed the Tennessee, his right wing, under Polk, 13,537 strong; the left wing, under Hardee, 13,763 strong,--total effective, rmy surrounded and invested Munfordville, and General Wilder, with its garrison of four thousand men, was forced to capitulate. General Kirby Smith, having found Morgan's position impregnable, detached a part of his forces to invest it, and, advancing on Lexington, defeated the Federal forces encountered at Richmond, Ky. He was r