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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 12 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 66 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 65 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 35 5 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 32 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for George W. Morgan or search for George W. Morgan in all documents.

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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
ave been broken during the remainder of the war. But General Buell would not consent to such movement, even when the thunder of Negley's cannon at Chattanooga made the Confederates in all that region so fearful, that they were ready to abandon every thing at the first intimation of an advance of their adversary. See how precipitately they fled from Cumberland Gap, their Gibraltar of the mountains, and the fortified heights around it, when, ten days after the assault on Chattanooga, General George W. Morgan, with a few Ohio and Kentucky troops, marched against it Jan. 18, 1862. from Powell's Valley. Twenty miles his soldiers traveled that day, climbing the Cumberland Mountains, dragging their cannon up the precipices by block and tackle, and skirmishing all the way without losing a man. They were cheered by rumors that the foe had fled. At sunset they were at the main works, and the flags of the Sixteenth Ohio and Twenty-second Kentucky were floating over those fortifications in the
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
bama, to McMinnsville, in Warren County, Tennessee. His headquarters, late in August, were at Huntsville, and General Thomas commanded the left wing at McMinnsville. E. Kirby Smith. So lay the opposing armies when E. Kirby Smith left Knoxville, and passing through Big Creek Gap of the Cumberland Mountains, with about six thousand men and a train of one hundred and fifty wagons, penetrated Kentucky by way of Knox County. By this movement he so completely outflanked and imperiled General G. W. Morgan, at Cumberland Gap, See page 303. that the latter blew up the works there and fled toward the Ohio, harassed nearly all the way by seven hundred of John Morgan's guerrillas. Smith's troops marched rapidly with very little encumbrance, and subsisted most of the way over the mountain region upon green corn, with the anticipation of living on the fat of the land in the Blue Grass region of Kentucky, and perhaps reveling in the luxuries of Louisville and Cincinnati. His cavalry, un
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 20: events West of the Mississippi and in Middle Tennessee. (search)
number and equipment, and the rough-riders of Morgan and Forrest had so very little fear of or resperate officers very happy. During that period Morgan, the guerrilla chief; was married to the daughf his army within nineteen miles of Nashville, Morgan, with a heavy body of cavalry and mounted infaor cavalry force gave him great advantage, and Morgan was continually threatening and often striking, and fifteen hundred of them were captured by Morgan, with the same number of cavalry and mounted is way to Bragg's army, below Murfreesboroa. Morgan, the guerrilla, was raiding upon Rosecrans's lith. They were too few to combat successfully Morgan's three thousand. These surrounded the town, rtillery, and was compelled to surrender, when Morgan's men, as usual;commenced destroying property,of blankets, provisions, and medicines. See Morgan and his Captors, by Rev. F. Senour, page 85. After destroying the railway for several miles, Morgan made a raid to Bardstown, where he saw danger,[3 more...]
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 21: slavery and Emancipation.--affairs in the Southwest. (search)
ess forests were felled in places, and formed a difficult Upper entrance to Vicksburg. this is a view on what is called the Valley road, the one entering Vicksburg from the north, nearest the river. At the point where this little sketch was taken was a strong palisade, and near it was a block-house, both. Of which were well preserved when the writer visited Vicksburg, in April, 1866. abatis. Sherman's army was organized in four divisions, commanded respectively by Brigadier-Generals G. W. Morgan, Morgan L. Smith, A. J. Smith, and Frederick Steele. The first three divisions had three brigades each, and the fourth one (Steele's), four. In the plan of attack Steele was assigned to the command of the extreme left, Morgan the left center, M. L. Smith the right center, and A. J. Smith the extreme right. The latter division not having arrived from Milliken's Bend (where it had remained as a support to a force under Colonel Wright, sent to cut the railway on the west side of
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 22: the siege of Vicksburg. (search)
ent him re-enforcements for the purpose. He had already adopted an important measure for the promotion of the efficiency of his army, by organizing it Dec. 22, 1862. into four corps, known as the Thirteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, and Seventeenth Army Corps. By a General Order issued on the 22d of December, 1862, in which the new organization was announced, the command of the Thirteenth Corps was assigned to Major-General John A. McClernand. It was composed of the Ninth Division, General G. W. Morgan; Tenth Division, General A. J. Smith, and all other troops operating on the Mississippi River below Memphis, not included in the Fifteenth Army Corps. The command. of the Fifteenth Corps was assigned to Major-General W. T. Sherman. It was composed of the Fifth Division, General Morgan L. Smith; the division from Helena, Arkansas, General F. Steele, and the forces in the District of Memphis. The command of the Sixteenth Corps was assigned to Major-General S. A. Hurlbut. It was com
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 23: siege and capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. (search)
Ninety-first New York), each man carrying his musket and a five-pound hand-grenade, to throw over the parapet. A third regiment (Twenty-fourth Connecticut) was detailed to carry sand-bags full of cotton, with which to fill the ditch in front of the breastworks, and enable the storming party to pass easily. These were to be followed by the regiments of Weitzel's brigade, under Colonel Smith, of the One Hundred and Fourteenth New York, to be supported by the brigades of Colonels Kimball and Morgan, under the general command of General Birge, the whole forming the storming party on the right. In conjunction with these, and on their left, moved a column under General Paine, composed of the old division of General Emory. Both parties were under the command of General Grover, who planned the attack. Acting Brigadier-General Dudley's brigade, of Auger's division, was held in reserve. It was intended to have Weitzel's command Weitzel's command was composed of his own brigade (Eighth