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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 12 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 66 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 65 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 35 5 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 32 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott). You can also browse the collection for George W. Morgan or search for George W. Morgan in all documents.

Your search returned 34 results in 6 document sections:

E. Rains Colonel, Commanding iost. Maj. H. L. Clay, Assistant Adjutant-General. headquarters, Cumberland Gap, March 22, 1862-11 a. m. Major: A line of couriers is established from this place direct to Knoxville; 2 men at intervals of 12 miles. The firing has ceased. Latrobes battery has driven the enemy off, and the snow having ceased, we have a clear day. There need be no uneasiness about us. We have undoubtedly killed one of the enemy, and they have mortally wounded one of Colonel Morgan's regiment. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, James E. rains Colonel, Commanding lost. Maj. H. L. Clay, Assistant Adjutant-General, Knoxville, Tenn. headquarters, Cumberland Gap, March 22, 1862. Major: It is 1 o'clock. The fight has opened with considerable vigor on both sides with artillery and infantry. We have 2 wounded. We will whip the fight. Our men are in good spirits. Very respectfully, James E. rains, Colonel, Commanding Post. Maj. H. L. Cla
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), March 25-28, 1862.-reconnaissance from Murfreesborough to Shelbyville, Tullahoma, Manchester, and McInnville, Tenn. (search)
his own acts during our absence. The Fourth left Shelbyville at 11 o'clock [and marched] to Tullahoma, being 18 miles, over the-most abominable road it was ever our lot to travel, mostly over solid and detached rock, miry lanes, and miry woods, the horses sinking over knee-deep in the mud. When within 8 miles our advance guard, commanded by Capt. H. C. Rogers, who was ordered ahead to feel the way and obtain news and forage for our horses, sent Dr. T. McMillen to the reserve, saying that Morgan and his men had gone down to Wartrace to burn bridges. We galloped the entire 8 miles in hopes we could realize the object of our pursuit (the horses came into Tullahoma covered with foam) and the full expectation of seizing a locomotive and bagging the command of the enemy; but, much to our chagrin, the enemy had received intelligence of our departure from camp, and they, afraid that their delay would cut them off, only took time to fire one bridge over Dack River; our march saved the oth
arters Army of the Ohio, July 15, 1862. General Morgan has had very great difficulties to contend permit such a diversion to be made? George W. Morgan, Brigadier-General, Commanding. [ince no. 5.] headquarters, June 9, 1862. General Morgan, Oumberland Ford: General Negley is ful no. 6.] headquarters, June 10, 1862. General Morgan, wumberland Ford: Considering your forc no. 9.] headquarters, June 10, 1862. General Morgan, Cumberland Ford: Your information in rno. 10.] headquarters, June 11, 1862. General Morgan, Cumberland Ford: General Negley has beno. 12.] headquarters, June 15, 1862. General Morgan, Williamsburg, Ky., Or wherever his heay. Duplicate sent to General Buell. George W. Morgan. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War. ldier has nobly discharged his duty. George W. Morgan, Brigadier-General, Commanding. Hon. E. respectfully your obedient servant, George W. Morgan, Brigadier-General Volwnteers, Commandmg[16 more...]
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
. These reports all being confirmed by subsequent information, on the 3d of June I received orders to make a forced reconnaissance toward Baldwin. I proceeded with the Third Michigan and Seventh Illinois Cavalry, the first division under Colonel Morgan, and Powells, Hescock's, and Houghtaling's batteries, by the main road to Baldwin, on the left-hand road from Booneville. Proceeding some 4 miles, where the road forks, I pushed forward, Captain Botham, Company L, Third Michigan, on the left, and Lieutenant Dykeman, with two companies Third Michigan, on the right hand roads. Leaving Colonel Morgan, with a part of his division and Hescock's and Houghtaling's batteries, to guard tle right-hand road, I followed with Colonel Roberts' brigade, Powell's battery, and the rest of the cavalry, upon the left or main Baldwin road, upon which was now heard sharp firing. Pressing on, I overtook at another fork of the road, near a grist mill, Captain Botham, who had driven the enemy's picke
ace. There were no men in Celina except those we captured, and they made desperate attempts to escape. I ordered Major Jordan to Butler's Landing the same evening, with directions to scour the country. He discovered the property captured by Morgan from steamer John A. Fisher, as well as some Confederate stores, and, having no means of transportation, destroyed them by throwing them into the river. He also captured Hamilton's celebrated race-horse. Returning to Tompkinsville, I found tomas J. Jordan, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry. Glasgow, Ky., June 6, 1862. Sir: I have just received information from Lieutenant Longsdorf, Company I, Ninth Pennsylvania Cavalry, that Captain McCullough was this morning attacked by Hamilton, Morgan, and Co. with about 200 men; that they drove the enemy before them, but that Captain McCullough and 4 men were badly wounded. After the fight the lieutenant retired to Tompkinsville, where he is now awaiting re-enforcements. I marched with my w
it of Starnes and his cavalry, who are now at Altamont. We captured a large number of rebel cavalry pickets and scouts; also a large quantity of contraband stores. The Union people are wild with joy, while the rebels are panic-stricken. Colonel Morgan is in Chattanooga; also General Adams. The enemy's force there is about 3,000, with ten pieces of artillery. The gunboat has not been heard from as yet; we are looking for it this morning. Two steamboats have left Chattanooga for Knoxvilleenemy opposite Chattanooga in considerable force. Opened yesterday at 5 p. m. with 40-inch Parrott guns. Firing ceased at noon to-day. Boats on the river secured. Mitchel is reported re-enforced from Corinth, and is acting in concert with General Morgan from Kentucky. His plans not yet developed. My little force in position to be concentrated, but entirely inadequate to hold the department. E. Kirby Smith, Major-General, Commanding. Capt. W. H. Taylor, A. A. G., Richmond, Va. Kn