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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 76 12 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 66 12 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 65 3 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 35 5 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 32 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 32 4 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 30 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 26 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for George W. Morgan or search for George W. Morgan in all documents.

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Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: (search)
derate forces General Buell's movement from Corinth for the Reduction of East Tennessee General G. W. Morgan's advance on Cumberland Gap its final occupation by him General Bragg Succeeds General s Hascall, Garfield and Wagner and three batteries of artillery: the Seventh division, Brig.-Gen. Geo. W. Morgan, containing Carter's, Spears', De Courcy's and Baird's brigades, the Sixth cavalry and of McMinnville, about half way between Nashville and Chattanooga. As part of this plan Gen. George W. Morgan had already been sent with his division to Cumberland Gap, to co-operate by a movement umidable army of General Buell was about to move, there was a force not larger than that of Gen. G. W. Morgan, soon to occupy its strongest defense. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, a trained soldier, was in com Gen. C. L. Stevenson and Gen. D. Leadbetter, with a small but efficient body of cavalry. Gen. G. W. Morgan, of Buell's army, had already moved with his division against Cumberland Gap, and by flank
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
Mount Sterling and Lexington; notified Gen. Geo. W. Morgan at Cumberland Gap of the danger to his io. The State will be under the domination of Morgan in a few days. He will take Frankfort and Lexecter growing, he telegraphed General Halleck, Morgan has invaded Kentucky with 3,000 men, robbed thlease look to it. Thus it went on until General Morgan took his leave, and then on the 20th, Geney had in their possession. But even before Morgan had ceased to vex the souls of his adversariesrring to the campaign at this period, he says: Morgan had not yet disappeared from Kentucky after hiched and sent into Kentucky on the occasion of Morgan's incursion. The consequence of this disasteril the 19th, when he first became aware of General Morgan's whereabouts. In the meantime the latterral Johnson advanced from Hartsville to attack Morgan, but when six miles west of Hartsville, he meconflict would have been quite different. General Morgan, in recognition of the gallantry of his co[7 more...]
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 10: (search)
ith the occupation of Cumberland Gap by Gen. Geo. W. Morgan a few days after this, and the demonstrby Smith organized the cavalry commands of General Morgan and Forrest, and sent them on their raids tion for active service. He is opposed by General Morgan, occupying a strong position near Cumberlat General Smith shall move at once against General Morgan, in front of Cumberland Gap. Should he besee and Kentucky is represented by Forrest and Morgan to have become intensely hostile to the enemy,m no protection. Both Buell at Bridgeport and Morgan at Cumberland Gap are now and have been for soSmith's moving far into Kentucky while leaving Morgan in his rear until he could engage Buell fully, and says he does not credit the amount of Morgan's supplies and has confidence in his timidity. HeBig Creek Gap to Barboursville, getting in General Morgan's rear, while Stevenson would threaten himted; through which also Thomas and Schoepf and Morgan had for a year tried to cover the ground, whic[2 more...]
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
its surplus, first by the Confederates on the south side and then by the Federals on both sides. On the other hand it would not have been wise to march to Louisville without a junction with Kirby Smith, whose force was scattered watching Gen. Geo. W. Morgan and threatening Cincinnati. He could not communicate in time to effect this speedily. The distance to Lexington was about one hundred and twenty-five miles, with neither telegraphic nor railroad communication. Even courier service was dal Bragg on the 18th of September sent the writer, one of his staff officers, to General Smith at Lexington, informing him of his purpose to move to Bardstown and directing him to send there a train of supplies, and while keeping an eye on Gen. Geo. W. Morgan, to dispose his forces with a view to early concentration at Bardstown for a movement on Louisville. The messages were delivered within forty-eight hours and immediate steps were taken accordingly. General Bragg, having attempted but fai
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 13: (search)
eneral Bragg's advance into Kentucky had come through Pound Gap from southwestern Virginia, with several thousand cavalry, favored crossing to the north side of the Kentucky river, sustaining the army in the Blue Grass region as long as possible and then retreating into Virginia by way of Pound Gap. General Bragg so far acceded to his proposition as to permit his return the same way. And so it was resolved to evacuate Kentucky. Cumberland Gap had been abandoned on September 17th by Gen. Geo. W. Morgan, who had made his way through the mountains by way of Manchester, Beattyville and West Liberty to Greenup on the Ohio, where he had arrived on the 3rd of October. His progress was impeded somewhat by the cavalry of General Marshall and Col. John H. Morgan, but the nature of the country not being favorable for cavalry operations, their resistance availed but little beyond preventing his movement westward, had he so designed. On September 27th a portion of Morgan's cavalry under Col.
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
ation became very similar to that of a year previous, when General Buell on the right and Gen. Geo. W. Morgan on the left seemed on the point of success. But the waste of a year upon the vital force brilliancy of the Confederate success. But now, when the Federal infantry was advancing, General Morgan executed a movement for the diversion of the enemy, which in its conception and details cons into West Virginia at Buffington's Island was captured on the 21st of July, and on the 26th General Morgan was forced to surrender with as many more, bringing the aggregate of his loss to more than hto the South in small detachments and were organized at Abingdon, Va. Of the imprisonment of General Morgan and his principal officers in the penitentiary at Columbus, Ohio, his romantic escape from tSeptember 4, 1864, at Greeneville, Tenn., reference must be made to the full and able history of Morgan's cavalry by his distinguished second in command, Gen. Basil W. Duke. The proper record of the
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
same time Federal reinforcements poured into Chattanooga, and General Grant, full of the prestige of Vicksburg and looming up into the prominence which soon placed him at the head of the Federal armies, was sent to restore the shattered confidence of Rosecrans' army. The result is told in few words. The Battle of the Clouds on Lookout Mountain is a myth. The battle of Missionary Ridge was little short of a disgrace. The resistance was as feeble as that of many of the detachments which Morgan captured in his raids, and with the loss of a few hundred the Confederate army fell back beyond the Chickamauga and went into winter quarters at Dalton, Ga. With it went the Kentucky brigade, farther and farther from home, yet with the same brave and loyal spirit which ever characterized it. General Preston had, before the battle of Missionary Ridge, been restored to his department in southwestern Virginia, but had left the Fifth Kentucky, which became permanently a part of the Orphan bri
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
ntucky cavalry: Ben Hardin Helm, Colonel, October, 1861, first organization—J. Russell Butler, Colonel, September 2, 1862, second organization— J. W. Griffith, Lieutenant-Colonel—H. C. Leavill, Lieutenant-Colonel—Thomas G. Woodward, LieutenantCol-onel—J. W. Caldwell, Major—N. R. Chambliss, Major. Second Regiment Kentucky cavalry: John H. Morgan, Colonel—Basil W. Duke, Lieutenant-Colonel, Colonel— James W. Bowles, Major, Lieutenant-Colonel, Colonel— John B. Hutcheson, Lieutenant-Colonel—G. W. Morgan, Major—T. B. Webber, Major. Third Regiment Kentucky cavalry (consolidated with First cavalry): J. Russell Butler, Colonel—Jack Allen, Lieutenant-Colonel—J. W. Griffith, Lieutenant-Colonel —J. Q. Chenoweth, Major. Fourth Regiment Kentucky cavalry: Henry L. Giltner, Colonel, October 6, 1861—Moses T. Pryor, Lieutenant-Colonel—Nathan Parker, Major. Fifth Regiment Kentucky cavalry: D. Howard Smith, Colonel, September 2, 1861—Preston Thompson, Lieutenant-Colo