Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 31, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John H. Morgan or search for John H. Morgan in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

S. Army. The soldiers were kept in tolerable subjection, and citizens were not interfered with to any great extent. One of the sights to be seen in the city was a Yankee soldier with his head shaved, and labelled "thief," marched up and down the street, followed, by a file of soldiers and a band of music. One of the regiments in Burnside's army corps (9th) had inscribed on its flag "Bull Run," which amused the people considerably. Mr. Crowley was on parole during his stay in Knoxville, extending to about two months, but spent much of the time in prison "on suspicion," as the Yanks called it. The bushwhacking in East Tennessee is still on the increase — brother bushwhacks brother. The Union men shoot a loyal citizen every chance they get, and a number of Morgan's disbanded men or stragglers in their turn bushwhack the Unionists. Neither party shows much mercy. The Yankee Generals with Burnside seemed very confident that the "rebellion would be crushed" in a few months.
Tories caught. --Through a gentleman, of White county, the Athens, Tenn., Watchman, learns that some of Morgan's men, who recently came into Cherokee county, North Carolina, and the news of whose advent had spread alarm through some of the upper counties, as they were reported to be Federal raiders, succeeded, one day last week, in capturing a portion of the notorious Bryson's men, seventeen of whom they hung, in the neighborhood of Blansville, Union county.--The news is deemed perfectly reliable.
Gen. Morgan. --The Montgomery Daily Advertiser publishes the life and military achievements of the renowned Gen. John H. Morgan, now a prisoner, with head shaved and piebald garments, in the penitentiary of Ohio. An extract from the article in question, which we subjoin, recapitulates all the grand exploits of this Southern Gen. John H. Morgan, now a prisoner, with head shaved and piebald garments, in the penitentiary of Ohio. An extract from the article in question, which we subjoin, recapitulates all the grand exploits of this Southern Paladin. No man of his day has accomplished more, if so much, and the summing up shows an array of glorious deeds that were never surpassed in number and brilliancy. The writer says: Morgan's career may be summed up with truth as follows: He has fought sixty-three battles, and has been successful in fifty seven; took 50,000Morgan's career may be summed up with truth as follows: He has fought sixty-three battles, and has been successful in fifty seven; took 50,000 prisoners, killed 20,000, and destroyed $50,000,000 worth of property, and taken 50,000 stands of small arms, and fifty pieces of artillery, 20,000 horses, and traveled 12,000 miles. These figures surpass anything in the annals of history, and he has not had with him at any time over 5,000 men for duty.