Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: February 24, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John H. Morgan or search for John H. Morgan in all documents.

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t it he failed to prove his identity he would accompany them to Atlanta — About this time one or two gentlemen who had seen him recognized him, and some facts were developed which satisfied the Home Guards that they had captured the veritable John H. Morgan! Of course he was at once released. Before leaving, he addressed the crowd briefly, commending, in the highest terms, the vigilance they had displayed — advising them to arrest all persons who could not give a satisfactory account of themseable John H. Morgan! Of course he was at once released. Before leaving, he addressed the crowd briefly, commending, in the highest terms, the vigilance they had displayed — advising them to arrest all persons who could not give a satisfactory account of themselves, and closed with the playful remark that twenty men had accomplished in Rabun what it required forty thousand in Ohio to do. The crowd gave nine cheers for Morgan, and he proceeded on his way to Walhalla-- Athens, (Tenn.) Watch
One of Morgan's officers. --The Columbus (Ohio) Express states that Col. Basil Duke, the "brains" of Morgan's command in the raid through Ohio, has been released from confinement in the penitentiary, by order of the War Department, and is now at Camp Chase, being allowed the perfect freedom of the camp. Upon receiving the order for Duke's release, Capt. Merion, the warden, refused to hand him over without a direct and unequivocal order from Gen. Brough. The latter issued such order, and Col. Basil Duke, the "brains" of Morgan's command in the raid through Ohio, has been released from confinement in the penitentiary, by order of the War Department, and is now at Camp Chase, being allowed the perfect freedom of the camp. Upon receiving the order for Duke's release, Capt. Merion, the warden, refused to hand him over without a direct and unequivocal order from Gen. Brough. The latter issued such order, and the prisoner was delivered over to the officer in command at Camp Chase.