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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore) 198 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 165 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 132 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 131 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 80 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 26, 1862., [Electronic resource] 56 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 28, 1863., [Electronic resource] 56 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 52 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 46 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 45 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 28, 1863., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for John Morgan or search for John Morgan in all documents.

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h. We are indebted to Major Norris, of the Signal office, for the following from the Baltimore American, of the 25th: Cincinnati, July 24.--Shortly after Morgan crossed the Muskingum yesterday he was attacked by the militia with two pieces of artillery. Fifteen rebels were killed, and several wounded. This morning MorgaMorgan crossed the Central Ohio railroad at Campbell's, burnt the depot, and tore up some of the track. At 9 o'clock he reached Washington, Guernsey county, where be did a great deal of damage, plundering, &c. Gen. Shackelford is close behind him. When last heard from Morgan was at Winchester, 12 miles Northeast of Cambridge, moving Morgan was at Winchester, 12 miles Northeast of Cambridge, moving to wards the Steubenville and Indians railroad, closely pursued by our forces. The German Democratic organ at Cleveland has taken down the name of Vallandigham from its columns, and raised that of Borough for Governor. The trial of Dr. Wright, of Norfolk, is progressing at Fortress Monroe. About 500 Confederate offi
the most brilliant character.-- The army and the people had adopted the idea of invincibility. Whether this led to ill-advised movements or not on the part of our Generals we are not able to say; but it had certainly imparted to the public mind a feeling of safety that has been rather rudely disturbed by recent events. In quick succession we have had the drawn battle of Gettysburg and the retreat of Gen Lee to the Potomac-- the surrender of Vicksburg and Port Hudson, and the capture of Morgan's expedition in Ohio. Our armies in the Southwest have been, with small exception, inactive, while the enemy has reduced the two garrisons on the Mississippi, by which some 35,000 or 40,000 men have been lost to the Confederacy. Why there was not some concentration of our forces under Johnston. Bragg, and Holmes, at some point or other, to strike a blow while the enemy was thus engaged, is a question those officers alone can answer. But there was not, and the enemy having achieved one gr
Morgan is Indiana. See the report of the magnificent exploits of Morgan, as told by the Yankees themselves, in another column of this paper. We were wrong in attributing rashness to his enterprise, and we retract that opinion. It was one of the most daring and best conceived that could possibly have been imagined. He knew the danger he ran of being captured with his comparative handful of men. But he believed that the service he could render would more than counterbalance all danger andMorgan, as told by the Yankees themselves, in another column of this paper. We were wrong in attributing rashness to his enterprise, and we retract that opinion. It was one of the most daring and best conceived that could possibly have been imagined. He knew the danger he ran of being captured with his comparative handful of men. But he believed that the service he could render would more than counterbalance all danger and all loss. And so it has turned out. The loss he has inflicted is prodigious, beyond all estimate or conception. We do not believe that he has been or will be captured. Indeed, the Yankee papers do not say so.
Morgan's Indiana raid. Morgan has not yet been caught, though for the last ten days he has beenr says: The destruction or capture of John Morgan's force is an event of much more importancey might. Even if Shackelford fails to capture Morgan himself, in the present desperate condition of6 o'clock with the startling intelligence that Morgan was at Piketon, having driven in all the picke, it being the object of our forces to capture Morgan's whole command if possible. Colonel Wallace by breaking though our lines. This remnant of Morgan's force immediately retraced their steps in thn o'clock. There was no fight worth the name. Morgan appeared to be very sparing of powder. There o successful: We have never believed that Morgan, after having crossed the Ohio at Brandenburg,. Hobson, following immediately in the wake of Morgan, was unable to obtain fresh horses, for Morgan Gen. Burnside has labored day and night since Morgan crossed the Ohio, to destroy and capture his f[12 more...]