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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 13 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 14, 1860., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: June 8, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 25, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Mrs. John A. Logan, Reminiscences of a Soldier's Wife: An Autobiography 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 15, 1865., [Electronic resource] 5 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 30, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 20, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3.. You can also browse the collection for Morrill or search for Morrill in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.44 (search)
r we should fall back and give up this key to the whole field of Gettysburg, or charge and try and throw off this foe. Colonel Chamberlain gave the order to fix bayonets, and almost before he could say charge! the regiment leaped down the hill and closed in with the foe, whom we found behind every rock and tree. Surprised and overwhelmed, most of them threw down their arms and surrendered. Some fought till they were slain; the others ran like a herd of wild cattle, as Colonel Oates himself expressed it. In their flight they were met by Company B, Captain Morrill, which we supposed had been captured, but now attacked so vigorously that over one hundred of the fugitives were compelled to surrender. Lieutenant-Colonel Bulger, commanding the 47th, was wounded, and fell into our hands, with over three hundred prisoners and all the wounded. The 20th Maine returned with its prisoners to the original position, and staid there until ordered forward in the early evening to Round Top.