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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Index, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 13, 1864., [Electronic resource] 2 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 9, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 3: assembling of Congress.--the President's Message. (search)
gifts, when they thought of rebellion, and revolution, and independent empire; for they believed that his scepter had made England and France their dependents, and that they must necessarily be the allies of the cotton-growers, in the event of war. Cotton is King! echoed back submissively the spindles of Old and New England. a Old Cotton will pleasantly reign When other kings painfully fall, And ever and ever remain The mightiest monarch of all, sang an American bard The late George P. Morris, whose son, Brigadier-General William H. Morris, gallantly fought some of the Cotton-lords and their followers on the Peninsula, in the Wilderness, and in the open fields of Spottsylvania, in Virginia, where he was wounded. years before; and now, a Senator (Wigfall) of the Republic, with words of treason falling from his lips, like jagged hail, in the very sanctuary where loyalty should be adored exclaimed:--I say that Cotton is King, and that he waves his scepter, not only over these t
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 11: advance of the Army of the Potomac on Richmond. (search)
he knoll seen more to the right, on rising ground. while he was giving directions for strengthening the intrenchments on his front. He fell dead; and then there was sincere mourning throughout the army, for the soldiers loved him; and the loyal people of the land felt bereaved, for a true patriot had fallen. He was succeeded in the command of the Sixth Corps, on the following day, by General H. G. Wright. On the same day Brigadier-General W. H. Morris, son of the lyric poet, the late George P. Morris, was severely wounded. Every thing was in readiness for battle on the morning of the 10th. May, 1864. By a movement the previous evening, having for its chief object the capture of a part of a Confederate wagon-train moving into Spottsylvania Court-House, Hancock had made a lodgment, with three of his divisions, on the south side of the Ny, and he was proceeding to develop the strength of the enemy on the National right, when General Meade suspended the movement. It had been determ
e done.” See yonder group of maidens, No joyous laughter now, For cares lie heavy on each heart, And cloud each anxious brow; For brothers dear and lovers fond, Are there amid the strife; Tearful the sister's anxious gaze-- Pallid the promised wife. Yet breathed no heart one thought of fear, Prompt at their country's call, They yielded forth their dearest hopes, And gave to honor all! Now comes a message from below-- Oh! quick the tidings tell-- “At Moultrie and Fort Johnson, too, And Morris', all are well!” Then mark the joyous bright'ning; See how each bosom swells; That friends and loved ones all are safe, Each to the other tells. All day the shot flew thick and fast, All night the cannon roared, While wreathed in smoke stern Sumter stood,. And vengeful answer poured. Again the sun rose, bright and clear, 'Twas on the thirteenth day, While, lo! at prudent distance moored, Five hostile vessels lay. With choicest Abolition crews-- The bravest of their brave-- They'd come <
The young man shot in the leg in the Baltimore riot, and taken to the Infirmary, and attended by Dr. Morris, appeared quite grateful for the humane attentions shown him. When asked why he came, the simple reply of the youth, was, Oh, the flag — the stars and stripes. --Phila, Press, May 1.
104. the Union, Right or wrong. by George P. Morris. A song for the Volunteers. I. In Freedom's name our blades we draw-- She arms us for the fight! For Country, Government and Law, For Liberty and Right. The Union must — shall be preserved; Our flag still o'er us fly! That cause our hearts and hands has nerved, And we will do, or die. chorus — Then come, ye hardy volunteers, Around our standard throng, And pledge man's hope of coming years-- The Union, right or wrong! The Union, right or wrong, inspires The burden of our song; It was the glory of our sires-- The Union, right or wrong! II. It is the duty of us all To check rebellion's sway; To rally at the nation's call, And we that voice obey! Then, like a band of brothers, go, A hostile league to break, To rout a spoil-encumber'd foe, And what is ours, retake. chorus — So come, ye hardy volunteers, Around our standard throng, And pledge man's hope of coming years-- The Union, right or wrong! The Union, right or wrong, inspir<
rgeon-general of South Carolina, D. 21; report on the casualties at Sumter, D. 72 Gibbs, Wolcott, D. 96 Giles, —, Judge, of Baltimore, difference with Maj. Morris, D. 69 Gilpin, —, Dr., Doc. 131 Gittings, John S., D. 71 Gleeson, John, N. Y. 69th, P. 131 Globe Bank of Providence, R. L, D. 27 G. M. S Guthrie, T. V., Col. of Ky., D. 55 Gwin, Wm. M. P. 55 H Habana, steamer, purchased by the, D. 29, 129 Habeas Corpus, writ of, refused by Major Morris, D. 69, 82 Hagen, J. C., poem by, P. 121 Hagerstown, Md., flag raising at, D. 47; Federal forces at, D. 107 Haggerty, Peter, Capt., D. 76 notice of, P. 22 Morgan, George G. W., P. 13, 85 Morgan, Tracy R., D. 67 Morgan and Company, of Nashville, Tenn., good example of, P. 38 Morris, George P., P. 86 Morris, W. W., Major, letter to Judge Giles of Baltimore, Doc. 239 Morris, Thomas A., Gen., proclamation at Philippi, Va., D. 96; Brig.-Gen.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Willis, Nathaniel Parker 1806- (search)
blished The corsair, in New York. He went again to England; wrote much while there; and prepared for Mr. Virtue the letter-press for two serial works, illustrated by Bartlett, on the scenery of Ireland and America. Returning in 1844, he and General Morris established the Evening mirror. His health soon gave way, and he again went abroad. He returned in 1846, after which until his death, in Idlewild, Cornwall, N. Y., Jan. 20, 1867, he was co-editor with Morris of the Home journal. His prose illustrated by Bartlett, on the scenery of Ireland and America. Returning in 1844, he and General Morris established the Evening mirror. His health soon gave way, and he again went abroad. He returned in 1846, after which until his death, in Idlewild, Cornwall, N. Y., Jan. 20, 1867, he was co-editor with Morris of the Home journal. His prose writings are more numerous by far than his poetry, yet he ranks among the distinguished American poets. Willis's sacred poetry is considered his best.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 6: school-teaching in Boston and Providence. (1837-1838.) (search)
ott. He has neither his poetic beauty nor his practical defects. Ms. His offer to her, as stated in Mr. Alcott's diary, was a liberal one for those days, and I am assured by Miss Jacobs, who followed Miss Fuller in the school, that the thousand dollars were undoubtedly paid, though Horace Greeley, in his Recollections, states the contrary. Mr. Fuller taught the school for a few years only, then went to New York and became connected with the New York Mirror, edited by N. P. Willis and George P. Morris. This he abandoned after a time, being tired, as he said, of supporting two poets, and was afterwards editor of the London Cosmopolitan. In addition to his bold choice of an assistant, he invoked the rising prestige of Ralph Waldo Emerson, inviting him to give an address at the dedication of the Academy (Saturday, June 10, 1837), and suggesting to him, he being still in the ministry, to bring sermons and preach in the two Unitarian churches. Margaret Fuller was ill for a time after
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Index. (search)
244. Lyric Glimpses, 286, 288. M. McDowell, Mrs., 211. Mackie, J. M., 168. Mackintosh, Sir, James, 187, 287, 288. Mann, Horace, 11, 12. Mariana, story of, 28. Marston, J. Westland, 146, 160. Martineau, Harriet, 86, 46, 68, 122-129, 222, 223, 283, 284. Martineau, James, 221. Mary Queen of Scots, 226. Mazzini, Joseph, 5, 229, 231, 236, 244, 284. Middleton, Conyers, 50. Mill, John Stuart 146. Milman, H. H., 228. Milnes, R. M. See Houghton. Milton, John, 69. Morris, G. P., 80. Mozier, Mrs., 276. N. Neal, John, 299. Newton, Stuart, 82. Novalis (F. von Hardenburg), 46,146. Nuttall, Thomas, 88. O. Ossoli, A. P. E., birth of, 258 ; descriptions of, 269, 268, 270, 271; death of, 279. Ossoli, G. A., descriptions of, 248, 244, 247; letters from, 249. Ossoli, Sarah Margaret (Fuller), per-sonal relations of author with, 2; manuscript letters and journals of, 8; demanded something beyond self-culture, 4, 6, 87, 88, 111, 213, 808, 309, 311; r
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 3: early essayists (search)
n none of these cases are the narratives apologues or character sketches of the sort traditionally associated with the periodical essay. Dana, though he continued to live in Cambridge, was intimately connected with Bryant and his set. The idle man was printed in New York, and it was there, naturally enough, that the vein opened by Irving and Paulding in Salmagundi was most consistently followed by writers of the Knickerbocker group, many of them contributors at one time or another to Colonel Morris's New York Mirror. From that paper Theodore Sedgwick Fay, better known as the author of successful but mediocre novels, clipped enough of his occasional writings to fill two volumes entitled Dreams and Reveries of a quiet man (1832). Save for the lively satire of the Little genius essays and a delicious travesty of Mrs. Trollope, there is little of other than historical interest in Fay's pictures of New York life. Distinctly in better form are the Crayon sketches by William Cox, an Eng
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