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James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 36 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 27 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 9 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 1 1 Browse Search
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maining section of Porter's battery, delayed in the same way, was brought into position by Lieutenant Morton, under a very heavy fire, and with the other guns continued firing until nightfall. It wa, he exclaimed, as Jordan has it, to the only unwounded officer left with his battery, Lieutenant John W. Morton, a mere lad of nineteen, Don't let them have the guns, Morton! Lieutenant Morton replMorton! Lieutenant Morton replied, No, captain, not while I have one man left! This battery, from its advanced and exposed position, lost eight men killed outright, and twenty-five wounded, out of forty-eight officers, non-commLieutenant Morton replied, No, captain, not while I have one man left! This battery, from its advanced and exposed position, lost eight men killed outright, and twenty-five wounded, out of forty-eight officers, non-commissioned officers, and men, actively engaged; the balance of the company, forty-two men, were drivers, teamsters, and artificers, protected in a ravine at some distance from the battery. Captain in 1869. He was a kind and cultivated gentleman, and a gallant soldier. His young lieutenant, Morton, before the close of the war became chief of artillery to General Forrest. Darkness separate
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Fort Donelson, Tenn. (search)
kner's division. Second Brigade, Col. Wm. E. Baldwin: 2d Ken., Col. R. W. Hanson; 14th Miss., Maj. W. L. Doss; 20th Miss., Maj. W. N. Brown; 26th Miss., Col. A. E. Reynolds; 26th Tenn., Col., John M. Lillard; 41st Tenn., Col. Robert Farquharson. Third Brigade, Col. John C. Brown: 3d Tenn., Lieut.-Col. T. M. Gordon (w), Maj. N. F. Cheairs; 18th Tenn., Col. J. B. Palmer; 32d Tenn., Col. E. C. Cook. Artillery: Kentucky Battery, Capt. R. E. Graves; Tenn. Battery, Capt. T. K. Porter (w), Lieut. John W. Morton; Jackson's Va. Bat tery. Division loss: k and w, 577 (approximate). Johnson's command (left wing), Brig-Gen. Bushrod R. Johnson. Heiman's Brigade, Col. A. Heiman: 27th Ala., Col. A. A. Hughes; 10th Tenn., Lieut.-Col. R. W. MacGavock; 42d Tenn., Col. W. A. Quarles; 48th Tenn., Col. W. M. Voorhies; 53d Tenn., Col. A. H. Abernathy, Lieut.-Col. Thomas F. Winston; Tenn. Battery, Capt. Frank Maney (w). Davidson's Brigade, Col. T. J. Davidson, Col. J. M. Simonton: 8th Ky., Lieut-Col. H
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate army. (search)
's Corps, Brig.-Gen. N. B. Forrest. Armstrong's division, Brig.-Gen. Frank C. Armstrong. Armstrong's Brigade, Col. J. T. Wheeler: 3d Ark.,----; 1st Tenn.,----; 18th Tenn. Battalion, Maj. Charles McDonald. Forrest's Brigade, Col. G. G. Dibrell: 4th Tenn., Col. W. S. McLemore; 8th Tenn., Capt. Hamilton McGinnis; 9th Tenn., Col. J. B. Biffle; 10th Tenn., Col. N. N. Cox; 11th Tenn., Col. D. W. Holman; Shaw's Battalion, Maj. J. Shaw; Tenn. Battery, Capt. A. L. Huggins; Tenn. Battery, Capt. John W. Morton. Pegram's division (composition of division uncertain). Brig.-Gen. John Pegram. Davidson's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. H. B. Davidson: 1st Ga.,----; 6th Ga., Col. John R. Hart; 6th N. C.,----; Rucker's Legion,----; Tenn. Battery (Huwald's). Scott's Brigade, Col. J. S. Scott: 10th Confederate, Col. C. T. Goode; Detachment of Morgan's command, Lieut.-Col. R. M. Martin; 1st La.,----; 2d Tenn.,----; 5th Tenn.,----; 12th Tenn. Battalion,----; 16th Tenn. Battalion, Capt. J. Q. Arnold (w); La.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Raid of Forrest's cavalry on the Tennessee river in 1864. (search)
Raid of Forrest's cavalry on the Tennessee river in 1864. By Captain John W. Morton, Chief of Artillery in Forrest's Cavalry Corps [Read before the Louisville BrForrest's Cavalry Corps, which I had the honor to command, namely, Walton's and Morton's, the former composed of two ten-pounder and two twenty-pounder Parrott guns wiman. Lieutenant T. S. Sale's section (Sale had been left sick in Mississippi)--Morton's battery — in charge of Lieutenant J. W. Brown, was placed on the river bank sLieutenant Joe M. Mason's section (Mason had been left sick at Jackson, Tenn.)--Morton's battery--Sergeant Lemuel Zarring in charge, was placed in position at Paris Lne, private Dick Clinton, of Walton's battery, and private T. H. Sack Moore, of Morton's battery, dropping the equipments of the cannoneer, followed the noble exampleervice in this novel charge with artillery. Orderly Sergeant Frank T. Reid, of Morton's battery, whose place was with the caissons in a protected situation, was, as
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Johnsonville. (search)
Battle of Johnsonville. By Captain John W. Morton. [Read before the Louisville Southern Historical AssociUndine and Venus from any attack from above. While Morton's battery was ordered to guard the rear, supported neral Bell's encampment was some two miles north of Morton's battery, in a large cypress grove, near the river: Clarksville, Tenn., April 29, 1882. Captain John W. Morton, Nashville, Tenn.: My Dear Captain,--On B. Thrall in preparing redoubts for his guns before Morton's arrival. Chambers were sunk for his guns, and emear of the war, had to cut out similar chambers for Morton's battery, some half mile or three-quarters below Jest at the positions prepared by Colonel Rucker for Morton's battery, he directed that these guns should be im placed in the chambers dug out by Colonel Rucker. Morton requested General Forrest to permit him to inspect onville, and desired to take the four rifle guns of Morton's battery. General Forrest objecting said — we sup
ntrepid commander was severely wounded late in the afternoon of Saturday, being succeeded in command by the gallant Lieutenant Morton. The artillery of Tennessee was especially conspicuous. Colonel Heiman reported that in the battle of the 13th,e working one of his guns, his gunners being nearly all of them disabled or killed. The command then devolved upon Lieutenant Morton, a beardless youth, who stepped forward like an old veteran, and nobly did he emulate the example of his brave captain. Lieutenant Morton subsequently became distinguished as captain of Morton's battery of Forrest's cavalry. Gen. N. B. Forrest, then colonel of Forrest's Tennessee cavalry, disputed the advance of General Grant on Fort Donelson with commendablMorton's battery of Forrest's cavalry. Gen. N. B. Forrest, then colonel of Forrest's Tennessee cavalry, disputed the advance of General Grant on Fort Donelson with commendable enterprise and skill, no other obstacle being offered to the march from Fort Henry, and pending the engagement he was actively employed on the flanks of our army. Besides his own regiment, three mounted companies from Kentucky, commanded by Captai
th, Col, Jacob B. Biffle; Tenth, Col. Nicholas N, Cox; Eleventh, Col. Daniel W. Holman; Shaw's and C. P. Hamilton's battalions and R. D. Allison's squadron, consolidated, under Maj. Joseph Shaw, and the batteries of Capt. A. L. Huggins and John W. Morton, Jr. In Pegram's division the Tennessee organizations were Col. E. W. Rucker's Tennessee legion and Capt. Gustave A. Huwald's battery, of Gen. H. B. Davidson's brigade; and the Second regiment, Col. H. M. Ashby, and Fifth, Col. G. W. McKenzi600 prisoners. In this day's battle, Forrest's cavalry was active and vigilant. Armstrong's division and Dibrell's brigade fought on foot and were always up with the infantry, for which General Forrest commended them with pride and pleasure. Morton's and Freeman's Tennessee batteries rendered valiant service in resisting the advance of Gordon Granger's column. Forrest's men were without rations, his horses were without water and had only a partial ration for two days, but no complaint was
th his regiment and one field gun under Capt. John W. Morton, attempted to destroy the stockade and fury until I was joined on the left by Capt. John W. Morton with one field gun, supported by Cox annnessee battalions, Woodward's Kentuckians and Morton's battery, in all about 800 men. Wharton's brie Colonel Biffle, Nineteenth Tennessee, and to Morton's battery, the honor belongs for the final triwith him McDonald's battalion and a section of Morton's battery, numbering 250 trained soldiers, ande retiring enemy with his escort, a section of Morton's battery, a detachment of Faulkner's regiment vicinity of our guns. These shells were from Morton's battery, whose terrible execution, in close commanded by Lieut. E. S. Walton; a section of Morton's battery, Lieut. Jo. M. Mayson commanding; the other section of Morton's battery, Lieut. Tully Brown commanding, all under the command of Capt. JCapt. J. W. Morton, opened fire on the Federal position. The troops commenced to advance, when Forrest gav[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
al John F. Wheless is chairman,) but may say that we have every prospect of a large and interesting meeting, We have already the promise of the following papers: I. The Battle of Franklin. Discussed in papers by Generals B. F. Cheatham, G. W. Gordon, W. B. Bate, and E. Capers. 2. Biographical sketch of General Bedford Forrest—By Rev. Dr. Kelly. 3. Sketch of Major Strange, of Forrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard. 9. Memoir of General Pat Cleburne—By General John C. Brown. Other papers and addresses will be announced. The meeting w
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
al John F. Wheless is chairman,) but may say that we have every prospect of a large and interesting meeting, We have already the promise of the following papers: I. The Battle of Franklin. Discussed in papers by Generals B. F. Cheatham, G. W. Gordon, W. B. Bate, and E. Capers. 2. Biographical sketch of General Bedford Forrest—By Rev. Dr. Kelly. 3. Sketch of Major Strange, of Forrest's Staff—By Colonel M. C. Galloway, of Memphis. 4. Tishomingo Creek (Sturgis's Raid)—By Captain John W. Morton, of Nashville, late Chief of Artillery of Forrest's cavalry. 5. Forrest's Raid into West Tennessee—By Colonel Cox, of Franklin, and Major G. V. Rambaut, of Memphis. 6. Recollections of the Battle of Shiloh—By Captain S. W. Steele. 7. A paper by General J. B. Palmer, of Murfreesboro. 8. Prison Experience at Johnson's Island—By Captain Beard. 9. Memoir of General Pat Cleburne—By General John C. Brown. Other papers and addresses will be announced. The meeting w
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