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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 6: the genius of Universal emancipation.1829-30. (search)
ribute to her memory, after visiting her grave in 1853, will be found in Lib. 23.190. He declared her worthy to be associated with Elizabeth Heyrick of England, and she certainly deserves to be known and honored as the first American woman who devoted her time and talents to the cause of the slave. The last page of the Genius was printed in French, for the benefit of Haytian subscribers, and also contained a list of agents for the paper in different cities. This included the names of James Mott, of Philadelphia, Dr. Bartholomew Fussell, of Kennett Square, Pa., and Samuel Philbrick, of Boston, none of whom were then personally known to Mr. Garrison, but who subsequently became his life-long friends and co-workers; and also James Cropper, of Liverpool. It was doubtless to the last-named gentleman, an active supporter of Wilberforce and Buxton in the English anti-slavery movement, that Lundy and Garrison were indebted for a frequent supply of reports and other publications showing
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 1, Chapter 12: American Anti-slavery Society.—1833. (search)
with thy father without knowing him; and when he learned that the man so gentle and peaceful was the man he had supposed a monster, he wept (Mrs. Elizabeth Buffum Chace to F. J. G., Ms. August, 1881). This story is told, anonymously, in the fifth of Angelina Grimkeas Letters to Catherine Beecher (Lib. 7.123). Pennsylvania, Thomas Shipley, the intrepid foe of slaveholders and kidnappers, Edwin P. Atlee, whose end, like Shipley's and Evan Lewis's, was lamentably near at hand, Thomas Whitson, James Mott, Bartholomew Fussell, and other less known (Hicksite) Friends. But the variety of character and talent gathered together in that upper story would not be comprehended if allusion were not also made to Joshua Coffin, Orson S. Murray, Ray Potter, Simeon S. Jocelyn, Robert B. Hall, Amos A. Phelps, John Rankin, A wealthy and liberal New York merchant, subsequently Treasurer of the American Anti-Slavery Society. Not to be confounded with the author of Rankin's letters (see Life of Arthur T