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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 83 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 70 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 55 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 41 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 23 1 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 21 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 1 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
ements of this first year,--Wilson's Creek, Lexington, and Pea Ridge,--see the papers by Generals Pearce and Wherry, Colonel Mulligan, and General Sigel, to follow.-editors. One of the stubbornest and bloodiest battles of the war now took place. ington, joined at every step by recruits. Reaching the city on the 12th of September with his mounted men, he drove Colonel Mulligan within his intrenchments, and as soon as his main body came up, completed the investment of the place. On the 20th to the front and converted them into movable breastworks, behind which his men advanced unharmed against the enemy. Colonel Mulligan was forced to surrender the next day. Price's loss was 25 killed and 72 wounded. Fremont reported to the War Departmn taken by the enemy from the Bank at Lexington, and restored it to the Bank. His force. amounted to about 18,000 men, Mulligan's to about 3600. In order to obtain the cooperation of the Confederate armies, the Governor and General Price sent
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., In command in Missouri. (search)
obstructions and weakened my authority. In fact, my command at the end of August had virtually existed little over a month; but the measures which I had initiated had already taken enduring shape, and eventually worked their intended result. The inadequate space to which I am restricted compels me to pass over here the circumstances which made inevitable the loss of Lexington, upon which Price advanced after his victory at Wilson's Creek. All possible efforts were made to relieve Colonel Mulligan, but, notwithstanding the large concentration of troops for his relief, these efforts were baffled by absolute want of transportation and by river obstructions. To the Confederate general it was a barren success, and he was shortly forced to retreat to the south-west. As a military position Lexington was of no value to him. In the midst of the demand for troops for Lexington, I was on the 14th ordered by General Scott to send five thousand well-armed infantry to Washington without a m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Arkansas troops in the battle of Wilson's Creek. (search)
k, September 1Oth; Peabody getting into Lexington first, Price, after a little skirmishing with Mulligan's outpost, bivouacked within 212 miles of Lexington. In the morning (12th) Mulligan sent out aMulligan sent out a small force which burnt a bridge in Price's path. Price then crossed to the Independence Road, and waited for his infantry and artillery. These came up in the afternoon, and Price then advanced toward Lexington, and drove Mulligan behind his defenses. There was a little skirmishing in a corn-field and in a cemetery through which Price advanced, and in the streets of Lexington, where he opened upon Mulligan with 7 pieces of artillery. Price's movement into Lexington in the afternoon of September 12th was only a reconnoissance in force. Toward dark he retired to the Fair Ground, and waitedt were hurrying to him from all directions, including Harris's and Green's commands from north of the Missouri. The investment of Mulligan's position was made as shown on the map, page 309.-editors.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 8.25 (search)
n, from newspaper reports of a lecture by Colonel Mulligan, who was killed during the war (see page learly demonstrable errors.-editors. Colonel James A. Mulligan. On the night of the 30th of Augules of Lexington. Sturgis, being informed of Mulligan's situation, retreated to Fort Leavenworth. the use of these, which is given both by Colonel Mulligan and by Colonel Snead as the morning of thhat he would have to submit the matter to Colonel Mulligan. As we knew that reinforcements were on the way to Mulligan, and as I feared that Mulligan was only practicing a ruse in order to gain time,o parole you and your men will be issued, Colonel Mulligan, without unnecessary delay. The only offas received with enthusiastic honors. Colonel Mulligan, after his exchange, was placed in commanhe battle of Winchester, July 24th, 1864, Colonel Mulligan received three mortal wounds. Some of thin a few moments fell, mortally wounded. Colonel Mulligan died forty-eight hours after, at the age [16 more...]
ndence, and for the security of the rights sealed to us in the blood of the first revolution. Honor and glory attend our success. Slavery and shame will attend our defeat. The schooner Two Sisters, a tender to the United States flag-ship San Jacinto, captured, while trying to enter the Suwanee River, the British schooner William, from Nassau.--General Butler addressed a characteristic letter to the Perfectionists of the city of Norfolk, Va.--the following report was made by Colonel James A. Mulligan, from his headquarters at New Creek, Va.: A soldier of ours, James A. Walker, company H, Second Maryland regiment, captured in the attack upon the train at the Moorfield and Alleghany Junction, on the third instant, by the enemy under General Fitz-Hugh Lee, escaped when near Brocks's Gap, on the fifth instant, and reported to me this morning. He informs me that thirteen of the enemy were killed and twenty wounded, in the skirmish. He also states that there was present under the c
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
ce attacks the post, 67. siege of Lexington Mulligan expects re-enforcements a severe struggle, 6hat Price would speedily attack the post, Colonel Mulligan took position on Masonic Hill, northeastwno shells. Hourly expecting re-enforcements, Mulligan resolved to defy his enemy with the means at ifty of his eighty men. This charge, said Colonel Mulligan, in his official report, was one of the mistance was utterly vain, to which conclusion Mulligan and his officers speedily arrived. Colonexington only a week before the arrival of Colonel Mulligan. They fled so hastily that they left behnty-five killed and seventy-five wounded. Colonel Mulligan was soon exchanged, and for his gallant sthird Illinois Regiment (which was now called Mulligan's brigade ) authority to wear on its colors t distant points. When he heard Sept. 13. of Mulligan's arrival at Lexington, and of General Price' after to-morrow [the day when the assault on Mulligan commenced], and consist of two full regiments[18 more...]
ille. Brevet Major-General James S. Wadsworth Killed at Wilderness. Brevet Major-General David A. Russell Killed at Opequon. Brigadier-General William H. Wallace Mortally wounded. Killed at Shiloh. Brigadier-General Thomas Williams Killed at Baton Rouge. Brigadier-General James S. Jackson Killed at Chaplin Hills. Brigadier-General Isaac P. Rodman Mortally wounded. Killed at Antietam. Brigadier-General Thomas G. Stevenson Killed at Spotsylvania. Brevet Brigadier-General James A. Mulligan Mortally wounded. Killed at Winchester (1863). Brigade commanders. Major-General George C. Strong Mortally wounded. Killed at Fort Wagner. Brevet Major-General Alexander Hays Hays commanded a division on the Gettysburg campaign. Killed at Wilderness. Brevet Major-General S. K. Zook Killed at Gettysburg. Brevet Major-General Frederick Winthrop Killed at Five Forks. Brevet Major-General Thomas A. Smyth Mortally wounded. Killed at Farmville. Br
ps, dated September 10, 1864, shows that the Army of West Virginia — Crook's two divisions — had only 7,507 effective men. At the battle of Winchester, however, July 24, 1864, Crook's command contamed three divisions, Sullivan's, Duval's. and Mulligan's. Colonel Mulligan, the hero of Lexington, was killed in that battle, and his division was cut up so badly that it was consolidated into one brigade, which was transferred to the First Division, where it became tlhe Third Brigade (Campbell's) oColonel Mulligan, the hero of Lexington, was killed in that battle, and his division was cut up so badly that it was consolidated into one brigade, which was transferred to the First Division, where it became tlhe Third Brigade (Campbell's) of that division. The corps lost about 1,200 men at Winchester; at the Opequon it lost 104 killed, 683 wounded, and 7 missing--a total of 794; at Cedar Creek it lost 48 killed, 270 wounded, and 540 captured, or missing; total, 858. General Lew. Wallace was assigned to the command of the Eighth Corps on March 12, 1863, and was in command at the battle of Monocacy, July 9, 1864. But that battle was fought chiefly by Ricketts' Division of the Sixth Corps; the only troops of the Eighth Corps w
ith's Fifteenth 18 50 86 154 66th Illinois Sweeny's Sixteenth 17 57 2 76 Winchester, Va.             July 24-25, 1864.             36th Ohio Duval's Eighth 9 103 24 136 13th West Virginia Duval's Eighth 14 50 15 79 23d Illinois Mulligan's Eighth 14 63 37 114 10th West Virginia Mulligan's Eighth 12 57 43 112 Deep Bottom, Va. Or, First Deep Bottom.             July 26-29, 1864.             110th Pennsylvania Birney's Second 7 24 -- 31 11th Maine Terry's Tenth 3 Mulligan's Eighth 12 57 43 112 Deep Bottom, Va. Or, First Deep Bottom.             July 26-29, 1864.             110th Pennsylvania Birney's Second 7 24 -- 31 11th Maine Terry's Tenth 3 29 -- 32 16th Penn. Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry A. P. 5 29 2 36 2d U. S. Cavalry Gregg's Cavalry A. P. 4 16 5 25 Petersburg Mine, Va.             July 30, 1864.             23d U. S. Colored Ferrero's In comparing losses in this engagement, it should be understood that this was the first action in which the colored troops of this division were engaged and that their ranks were comparatively full. Ninth 74 115 121 310 30th U. S. Colored Fe
for three months service, at the expiration of which they reorganized and enlisted for three years. Illinois responded promptly to every call for men, and was one of the few States which furnished troops in excess of its quota. Of the generals who attained prominence in the war, Illinois is credited with: Grant, Logan, McClernand, Schofield, Palmer, Hurlbut, Black, Giles A. Smith, Oglesby, McArthur, Grierson, John E. Smith, Eugene A. Carr, White, Carlin, Lawler, Morgan, E. J. Farnsworth, Mulligan, and many others. As in the troops from other States, many of the Illinois regiments had distinctive synonyms by which they were known as well as by their numerical designations. Among these were: First Scotch 12th Illinois. Yates Phalanx 39th Illinois. Second Scotch 65th Illinois. First Douglass 42d Illinois. First Irish 23d Illinois. Northwestern Rifles 44th Illinois. Irish Legion 90th Illinois. Lead Mine regiment 45th Illinois. First Hecker 24th Illi
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