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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee's Lieutenants. (search)
Jordan, New York. A. R. Johnson, Texas. J. D. Kennedy, Camden, S. C. William H. King, Austin, Tex. William W. Kirkland, New York. James H. Lane, Auburn, Ala. A. R. Lawton, Savannah, Ga. T. M. Logan, Richmond, Va. A. L. Long, Charlottesville, Va. Robert Lowry, Jackson, Miss. Walter B. Lane, Texas. Joseph H. Lewis, Kentucky. W. G. Lewis, North Carolina. William McComb, Gordonsville, Va. Samuel McGowan, Abbeville, S. C. John T. Morgan, United States Senate. T. T. Munford, Lynchburg, Va. H. B. Mabry, Texas. W. W. Mackall, Warrenton, Va. George Maney, Nashville, Tenn. James G. Martin, North Carolina. John McCausland, West Virginia. Henry E. McCulloch, Texas. W. R. Miles, Mississippi. William Miller, Florida. John C. Moore, Texas. Francis T. Nichols, New Orleans. E. A. O'Neal, Montgomery, Ala. R. L. Page, Norfolk, Va. W. H. Payne, Warrenton, Va. W. F. Perry, Glendale, Ky. Roger A. Pryor, New York. Lucius E. Polk, Tenness
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 19. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.19 (search)
slow to confirm the impression that with these reinforcements he would sweep down the Valley again. He took into his confidence Colonel T. T. Munford, who commanded the advance of his cavalry, and he detailed for special duty Mr. William Gilmer, of Albemarle, who was widely known in Virginia as a political speaker, and in the army as a gallant soldier. A number of Federal surgeons, who had come under a flag of truce to look after Banks' wounded, were quartered in a room adjoining Colonel Munford's, when Mr. Gilmer (Billy Gilmer was his popular subriquet) stalked in with rattling saber and jingling spurs, and in loud tones announced, Dispatches for General Jackson. What is the news? he was asked loud enough to be heard by surgeons in the next room, who pressed their ears to the key-holes and cracks eager to catch every word. Great news, was the loud response. Great news. The whole road from here to Staunton is full of gray people coming to reinforce us. There is General Whi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
Birmingham, Alabama. A. R. Johnson, Texas. J. D. Kennedy, Camden, South Carolina. William H. King, Austin, Texas. William W. Kirkland, New York. James H. Lane, Auburn, Alabama. A. R. Lawton, Savannah, Georgia. T. M. Logan, Richmond, Virginia. Robert Lowry, Jackson, Mississippi. Joseph H. Lewis, Kentucky. W. G. Lewis, Tarboro, North Carolina. William McComb, Gordonsville, Virginia. Samuel McGowan, Abbeville, South Carolina. John T. Morgan, United States Senate. T. T. Munford, Lynchburg, Virginia. George Maney, Nashville. John McCausland, West Virginia. Henry E. McCullock, Texas. W. R. Miles, Mississippi. William Miller, Florida. B. McGlathan, Savannah, Georgia. John C. Moore, Texas. Francis T. Nichols, New Orleans, Louisiana. R. L. Page, Norfolk, Virginia. W. H. Payne, Warrenton, Virginia. W. F. Perry, Glendale, Kentucky. Roger A. Pryor, New York City. Lucius E. Polk, Ashwood, Tennessee. W. H. Parsons, Texas. N. B. Pearce, Arkans
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign and battle of Lynchburg. (search)
t was made up of companies from Lynchburg and the surrounding counties, and was, therefore, one of whose record we all have a right to be proud. On the day of that fight it was especially distinguished for its daring courage and for its achievements. It was in the front of the charging column which broke Custer's line and captured four out of the five caissons lost by Sheridan on that day. It captured Custer's headquarters, his sash and private wagon and papers. The wagon was used by General Munford until it was recaptured, a few days before Appomattox. On the 12th of June General Lee, who had anxiously been watching the movements of the enemy in the Valley, and who was perfectly informed of his designs, gave verbal orders to General Jubal A. Early to hold his corps (the Second, or Ewell's), with Nelson's and Braxton's artillery, in readiness to march to the Shenandoah Valley. After dark upon that day these orders were repeated in writing, and he was directed to move to the Val
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), New Market day at V. M. I. [from the Richmond, Va., times-dispatch, June 24, 1903. (search)
the recipient, and a cross is also to be sent the family of each man who fell in battle, or who has died since he took part in the fight. Colonel Cutshaw, speaking to the resolutions, said he felt it was peculiarly appropriate that he should offer them, in that in 1863, while recovering from wounds received in battle, he was commandant of cadets, and he put them through some months of hard work on the parade ground and in camp, which fitted them well for the New Market ordeal. General T. T. Munford, of Lynchburg, an old cadet, though not in the New Market battalion, made an eloquent speech endorsing the resolutions. There were loud calls for Purcell, and Colonel John B. Purcell, of Richmond, an Institute man, though not at New Market, but one who wore the Confederate gray when only fourteen years of age, made a speech full of tender eloquence in advocating the resolutions. General G. C. Wharton, class of 47, and a brigade commander at New Market, spoke a few words urging
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Captain Don P. Halsey, C. S. A. (search)
he held until the following spring, when at the re-organization of his company he withdrew and went as a volunteer aide-de-camp upon the staff of General Longstreet, his company, with four others of his regiment under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel T. T. Munford, having belonged to Longstreet's Brigade. This position he held but a short time, being soon commissioned as aide on General Garland's staff. His efficiency as a staff officer was such as to elicit golden opinions from every generajustly proud, as it is the unvarying testimony of his comrades and all with whom he served, that no man of his rank in the armies of the Confederacy made a better record for zeal, efficiency and bravery. That fine old Virginia gentleman, General T. T. Munford, who served with him during a great part of the war, has repeatedly made the statement that there was no better, braver, truer soldier in the army than Don Halsey. Such is the testimony also of Captain B. M. Collins, of the 12th North C
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Remarks of Captain John Lamb on March 24, 1899, at Richmond, Virginia, in the Hall of R. E. Lee Camp, no. 1, C. V. In accepting, on behalf of the Camp, the portrait of General Thomas T. Munford, C. S. Cavalry. (search)
. But how much shorter would have been the bloody list filled up the next day at Malvern Hill. When Dabney says, this temporary eclipse of Jackson's genius was probably to be explained by physical causes; the whole story of the White Oak Swamp is told in a few words. I wish to emphasize the fact that Colonel T. T. Munford performed well and satisfactorily the part assigned him that day, for on a little slip of paper General Jackson wrote to him: I congratulate you on getting out. Had Munford's suggestion been followed, Franklin would have been forced back to where Heintzelman and McCall were barely holding their own against Longstreet and A. P. Hill. The Federal forces, disputing the passage of Fisher's Run by Armistead and Mahone, would have been forced to fall back, and Huger's whole division would have reinforced Longstreet; while Magruder at Timberlake's store, on the Darbytown Road, at two o'clock, the 30th, was within two hours march of Glendale. To one who understand
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Second Manassas campaign. (search)
d to duty as the advance guard of Jackson's corps. McClellan, in his life of Stuart, says: Colonel Munford had seen much service in the Valley under Jackson, and had performed the same duty for him during the battles around Richmond. At Bristoe Station Jackson sent Colonel Munford to surprise and capture the place; this he succeeded in doing, dispersing a cavalry company, capturing forty-throf stores, and when Ewell had to withdraw from Bristoe Station, the 2d and 5th regiments, under Munford and Rosser, covered his rear. On the 28th, 29th and 30th of July, 1862, the fights at Grovetowigade in one of the most brilliant fights of the war. Every account I have met with, accords to Munford and the 2d Virginia the honors of the fight. Munford led the charge, and was dismounted by a Munford led the charge, and was dismounted by a sabre stroke, and his horse killed. In a few moments, five of his men were killed outright, and over forty wounded. The 7th and 12th regiments—the latter commanded by Colonel A. W. Harman—supporte
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland campaign. (search)
tember; Fitz Lee moving on the New Market, Hampton on Hoyattstown roads, while Munford covered Sugar Loaf mountain, with his pickets extended as far as Poolesville. t had been detached, and the 17th battalion sent on some special duty; so that Munford had only three regiments, the 7th, 12th and 2d. On the 7th of September, Pleasanton's cavalry drove in Munford's pickets, and on the next day attaeked his command with superior numbers, driving the 12th regiment before them in some confusion.Church, in which the 7th again suffered loss. On the 10th Pleasanton attacked Munford on Sugar Loaf Mountain, but was repulsed; on the 14th Franklin's corps advanced in force, and Munford retired to a point near Frederick. The critical situation of the Confederate army on the 14th of September is well known to the old soldiersf the Federals at Crampton's Gap and other points—the defence of the former by Munford, with his two regiments and a fragment of the two regiments from Mahone's brig
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 32. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), From the Valley to Fredericksburg. (search)
ition of General Lee's army. The one from Harper's Ferry, under General W. S. Hancock, was composed of 1,500 infantry, four regiments of cavalry and four pieces of artillery—numbering perhaps 5,000 men or more. This advance was opposed by Colonel Munford with a part of the 2d, 7th and 12th Virginia cavalry. He was supported by one gun of Chew s battery, and three of the Richmond Howitzers under Captain B. H. Smith, Jr. Captain Smith lost a foot in this fight, and Lieutenant H. C. Carter,irginia cavalry. He was supported by one gun of Chew s battery, and three of the Richmond Howitzers under Captain B. H. Smith, Jr. Captain Smith lost a foot in this fight, and Lieutenant H. C. Carter, of this city, was badly wounded. By one of those curious mistakes that sometimes occur, Colonel Munford mistook this Carter for J. W. Carter, who was in Chew's battery. McClellan in Life of Stuart follows this report. So, we are engaged to-night in correcting, as well as preserving, histor
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