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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 38 20 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 21 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 17 9 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 16 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 14 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 11 5 Browse Search
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac 9 1 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 7 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 5 1 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 4 2 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First great crime of the War. (search)
t ordered the Army of the Potomac to move forward on or before February 22d, to take Manassas. This order was countermanded early in February, and toward the end of the month orders were given to collect the transportation necessary to move the army by water. On the 8th of March I was ordered to repair to headquarters. Assembled there were the General-in-chief, the Engineer of the Army of the Potomac, and all of the division commanders, except General Hooker, who was represented by General Naglee. General McClellan submitted to us his plan for the movement of the army, and then left us to ourselves. Upon the question of approval of his plan the vote was, I think, nine for approval to three against it, although it has been reported as eight to four. I believed then, and still believe, that the main object of the meeting was to obtain a condemnation of the plan by the subordinate generals. Immediately after this meeting we were informed that the President wished to see us. We we
six o'clock in the morning. During the same night, the 4th Corps, followed by the 5th, was moving towards the river, and on the morning of Monday, June 30, General Keyes had arrived there in safety. He took up a position below Turkey Creek bridge, with his left resting on the river. General Porter posted the 5th Corps so as to prolong Keyes's line to the right and cover the Charles City road to Richmond. General Franklin, with his. own corps, Richardson's division of the 2d Corps, and Naglee's brigade, held the passage of White Oak Swamp. The position of the remaining troops was changed at times during the day; but it is enough to say that they were so disposed as to hold the ground in front of the road connecting Franklin's position with Porter's right, so as to cover the movement of the trains in the rear. General McClellan occupied himself in examining the whole line, rectifying the position of the troops, and expediting the passage of the trains. The fierce battle fough
e months regiments had fought creditably at Kinston, Whitehall, and Goldsboro, in Deceimber, 1862, the same month in which the corps was organized. In February, 1863, the roster showed five divisions, commanded respectively by Generals Palmer, Naglee, Ferry, Wessells, and Prince, with General J. G. Foster in command of the corps. Ferry's and Naglee's Divisions — containing sixteen regiments — were detached in February, 1863, and ordered to Charleston Harbor, where they were attached to the TNaglee's Divisions — containing sixteen regiments — were detached in February, 1863, and ordered to Charleston Harbor, where they were attached to the Tenth Corps, becoming subsequently a part of that organization. In June, 1863, the twelve regiments which had been enrolled for nine months only took their departure, their term of service having expired. In place of these losses the troops of the Seventh Corps were transferred, that organization having been discontinued August 1, 1863. With the Seventh Corps came a valuable accession of veteran material in Getty's Division, formerly of the Ninth Corps. This division had been left in South-e
  Totals 120 498 288 906 Present, also, at Williamsburg; Bottom's Bridge; White Oak Swamp; Malvern Hill; Wood's Cross Roads; Cole's Island; Morris Island; Bermuda Hundred; Grover House; Hatcher's Run; Pursuit of Lee; Appomattox. notes.--The One Hundredth was recruited in Buffalo, and on March 7, 1862, started from there, 960 strong, arriving at Washington March 12th. It embarked on March 21st for Fort Monroe, where it joined General McClellan's Army, having been assigned to Naglee's (1st) Brigade, Casey's (2d) Division, Fourth Corps. Colonel Brown was killed at Fair Oaks, after which Colonel George B. Dandy, of the Regular Army, was assigned to the command of the regiment. The One Hundredth was present at all the operations in Charleston Harbor in June, 1863, and, under command of Colonel Dandy, shared in the desperate assault on Fort Wagner. In this action the regiment behaved with signal gallantry, and although the attack was unsuccessful, the flag of the One Hu
Third. May, ‘61 2d Massachusetts Reenlisted. 14 176 190 2 96 98 288 Williams's Twelfth. Sept., ‘62 3d Massachusetts Nine months men.   1 1   17 17 18 Naglee's Eighteenth. Sept., ‘62 4th Massachusetts Nine months men. 1 19 20 2 129 131 151 Emory's Nineteenth. Sept., ‘62 5th Massachusetts Nine months men.   18 18 31 Corcoran's Seventh. June, ‘61 7th Massachusetts 4 76 80 2 72 74 154 Getty's Sixth. Oct., ‘62 8th Massachusetts Nine months men.         11 11 11 Naglee's Eighteenth. June, ‘61 9th Massachusetts 15 194 209 3 66 69 278 Griffin's Fifth. June, ‘61 10th Massachusetts 10 124 134 1 55 56 190 Getty's Sixth. June                Mar., ‘65 192d New York         26 26 26     April, ‘65 193d New York         25 25 25     June, ‘62 Les Enfans Perdus   9 9   52 52 61 Naglee's Eighteenth.   National Guard.                   April, ‘61 8th New York Three-months' service.
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
ted in the charge on the 3d of July, and of these the flag-bearer was shot, and the captain brought out the flag himself. Form the magazine, Our Living and our dead. This loss of the 26th North Carolina, at Gettysburg, was the severest regimental loss during the war. The next instance, in point of numerical loss, is that of the 6th Alabama--Colonel John B. Gordon--at Fair Oaks. This regiment was then in Rodes's Brigade of D. H. Hill's Division, which in this fight was pitted against Naglee's Brigade of Casey's Division. The regiment lost 91 killed, 277 wounded, and 5 missing; total, 373, out of about 632 engaged. In the same battle, and in D. H. Hill's Division also, the Fourth North Carolina of G. B. Anderson's Brigade, sustained a loss of 77 killed, 286; wounded, and 6 missing; total, 369;, out of 678 engaged. At Gaines's Mill the First South Carolina Rifles, Gregg's Brigade, A. P. Hill's Division, charged a battery which was supported by the Duryee Zouaves. The Rifl
oad a trifle, and they had been extended by Gen. Naglee to the open field where the enemy was seen fer to his report, and to the reports of Brig.-Gens. Naglee, Palmer and Wessells, whose activity I h— Palmer's Camp. G — Wessell's Camp. H — Naglee's Camp. I--Rebel line, 1st June. J--Uniomanner, under the immediate direction of Brig.-Gen. Naglee, commanding First brigade, the enemy beis were under the particular direction of Brig.-Gen. Naglee, and I refer to his report for further mention of them. Gen. Naglee behaved with distinguished gallantry through the engagement, having a ving and the dead. Very respectfully, etc., Naglee, Brigadier-General. To Lieut. Foster, A. A.A. brigade of Casey's division, (commanded by Gen. Naglee,) was pushed in advance of the whole army, ill confess that Casey's division, or at least Naglee's brigade, deserves no special credit; but at ed only harshness and calumny. The whole of Naglee's brigade is now less in size than some regime[9 more...
praise for their kindness and attention to the wounded. --Louisville Journal. Doc. 115.-General Naglee's reconnoissance, on the Chickahominy, Va., May 24. Gen. Keyes's headquarters, Saturdaye Pines, some eight and a half miles from Richmond. The reconnoissance was conducted by Brig.-Gen. Naglee, and consisted of infantry and cavalry force. The One Hundred and Fourth Pennsylvania, Co alluded to and a strong infantry reserve. At about ten o'clock the command was halted by General Naglee, a short distance this side of Mr. Higgins's house, behind which the rebels had two batterief not all of them, were drenched to the skin. The reconnoissance was admirably conducted by General Naglee, and the movements were made by him with the greatest precaution. The point now held by o Pennsylvania cavalry,--together with a body of infantry, all under the immediate command of General Naglee, made a reconnoissance yesterday some two miles in advance of this point. They drove in the
Doc. 115.-General Naglee's reconnoissance, on the Chickahominy, Va., May 24. Gen. Keyes's headquarters, Saturday, May 24. This morning a reconnoissance was made in force upon our left wing, for the purpose of ascertaining the strength of tin the neighborhood of the Pines, some eight and a half miles from Richmond. The reconnoissance was conducted by Brig.-Gen. Naglee, and consisted of infantry and cavalry force. The One Hundred and Fourth Pennsylvania, Col. Davis, and the Fifty-shese followed the battery alluded to and a strong infantry reserve. At about ten o'clock the command was halted by General Naglee, a short distance this side of Mr. Higgins's house, behind which the rebels had two batteries planted, from one of whir shoe-tops, and most, if not all of them, were drenched to the skin. The reconnoissance was admirably conducted by General Naglee, and the movements were made by him with the greatest precaution. The point now held by our troops is of the great
of the Appomattox River. Two shells were thrown into the town, and the enemy skedcladled. The Galena is very much cut up by the enemy's shot. She will be obliged to go into dock before she can go into action again. The battery she was engaged with mounted thirty large guns. A lot of shot are still sticking in her below the water-line. Colonel Samuel W. Owen, with a battalion of the Third Pennsylvania cavalry,--together with a body of infantry, all under the immediate command of General Naglee, made a reconnoissance yesterday some two miles in advance of this point. They drove in the enemy's pickets, killing one. They found the enemy in force, posted with artillery. The reconnoissance accomplished, the whole party returned without accident, the enemy not deeming it proper to follow, although outnumbering the Unionists largely. The Eighth Pennsylvania cavalry, Col. Gregg, a few hours later, met a body of the rebels, engaged them and drove them toward Richmond. Colonel Gr
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