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The Daily Dispatch: October 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for John Newton or search for John Newton in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 104 (search)
detached from this brigade and attached to the Third Brigade of the division. July 18, pushed forward and crossed Nancy's Creek in pursuit. July 20, crossed Peach Tree Creek and took position in line of battle in the afternoon of that day. Here, although the brigade was not actively engaged with the enemy, it was exposed to a dangerous fire of shell and canister, which the enemy opened upon our forces. In the evening the brigade was ordered to the left about two miles to fill a gap on General Newton's left, the Fifteenth Infantry being detached and sent to a mill farther to the left to guard a bridge crossing the Peach Tree Creek. Remained in this position till the morning of July 22, when we rejoined the division and marched in the direction of Atlanta until within two miles of that place, where we took position, built works, and remained till August 3, all the time under severe musketry and artillery fire. During these twelve days all the battalions composing the brigade were en
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 170 (search)
was severely wounded while in the act of raising the colors of his regiment from the ground, where they had fallen in consequence of the wounding of his color bearer. With so gallant a leader it is not strange his regiment should have done so nobly. Major Wilson, commanding Fourteenth Ohio, was severely wounded at almost the beginning of the engagement whilst gallantly urging his brave men forward by both voice and example. His place was fortunately filled by Capt. George W. Kirk and Adjutant Newton, than whom no better or braver men live. Major Morgan, commanding Seventy-fourth Indiana, was everywhere encouraging his men and sharing equally with them the dangers of the battle. Colonel Hays, commanding Tenth Kentucky, gallantly assisted by Lieutenant-Colonel Wharton and Major Davidson, showed himself to be among the bravest of the brave, and, with his command, was among the first to reach the enemy's works. The amputated arms and limbs and torn bodies of the wounded officers
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 182 (search)
.-The troops bivouac on Tunnel Hill and at General Newton's position to-night. Orders were receivedt Gap. At 2.40 sent word to General Wood that Newton had been ordered to push Harker's brigade alonlley road, watching his right. 11 a. rm., General Newton arrived at Dalton; head of his column justagons for Wood, five for Stanley, and four for Newton, to accompany the troops. The crossing of the6 p. m., assault was ordered to be made by General Newton, and was just about to be made, when Majors brigades, Palmer's corps, came up abreast of Newton, on his left, and commenced to strengthen the o his old camp until night-fall. 4 p. m., General Newton reported that he had sent out two regimental Thomas for instructions as to Stanley's and Newton's routes of march, and he said that the prograd he was repulsed with severe loss, while his (Newton's) was incredibly small. 9 p. m., General Stall. Day quite cool for July, and bright. General Newton seized a ridge in his front to-night and a[407 more...]
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