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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 1,193 3 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 128 4 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 121 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 68 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 55 5 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 47 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 46 2 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 22 0 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 19 3 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 19 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for John Newton or search for John Newton in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 5: invasion of Virginia. (search)
his first purpose to make a feint on Beauregard at Manassas, while making a real attack upon Joe Johnston in the Valley of Virginia. With the defeat of Johnston the victorious army could march on Beauregard at Manassas, re-enforced by the troops around the Federal capital. Soldiers of high reputation and great merit were ordered to report to Patterson. Fitz John Porter was his adjutant general, Amos Beckwith commissary of subsistence, Crosman quartermaster, Sampson topographical engineer, Newton engineer; while such men as A. E. Burnside, George H. Thomas, Miles, Abercrombie, Cadwalader, Stone, and Negley commanded troops; and then, the laws being silent in the midst of arms, Senator John Sherman, of Ohio, was his aid-de-camp. From Patterson's position two routes led to the Valley of Virginia, one via Frederick, Md., across the Potomac at Harper's Ferry, the other by Hagerstown, Md., crossing at Williamsport and thence to Martinsburg. Patterson wisely selected the latter route, b
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
partment and to collect supplies, and was thus deprived of their support when the campaign opened. Across the river his better sheltered, fed, and clothed opponent had his troubles too. Burnside had lost the confidence of many of his principal officers, and after a harmless attempt to reach Lee by Banks's Ford, six miles above Fredericksburg, further winter operations were suspended. Then Burnside prepared a sweeping order, dismissing from the Army Generals Hooker, Brooks, Cochrane, and Newton, and relieving from their commands Generals Franklin, W. F. Smith, Sturgis, Ferrero, and Colonel Joseph Taylor, Sumner's adjutant general. To approve the order, or accept his resignation, was the alternative presented to the President. Mr. Lincoln accepted his resignation, and immediately placed the baton of the army commander in the hands of Joseph Hooker, the head and front of the caballed officers. Mr. Lincoln's letter of January 26, 1863, to Hooker, is characteristic. He tells him h
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 12: Gettysburg. (search)
twelve feet square in the Liester House his commanders assembled. Should the army attack or wait the attack of the enemy? was the written question they were required to answer; and they voted-as they should have done, being in superior position, with interior lines — to wait, as Lee had done at Fredericksburg, for another attack, and found him more accommodating than Burnside. General Lee had a difficult task: the lines of his enemy had grown stronger during the night; Slocum, Howard, Newton (in Reynolds's place), Hancock, Sickles, Sykes, and Sedgwick's troops were all before him, and on his right and left flank was a division of cavalry under Gregg and Kilpatrick respectively. The Union flanks, five miles apart on Culp's Hill and the Round Tops, were almost impregnable and difficult to turn. Lee's strategy at Chancellorsville was bold, but his determination to assault the left center of the Union army with his right corps and its supports was consummate daring. Longstreet, r
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 14: siege of Petersburg. (search)
a kind letter from the Rev. Mr. Cole, of Culpeper Court House. He is a most excellent man in all the relations of life. He says there is not a church standing in all that country within the lines formerly occupied by the enemy. All are razed to the ground, and the materials used often for the vilest purposes. Two of the churches at the Court House barely escaped destruction. The pews were all taken out to make seats for the theater. The fact was reported to the commanding officer, General Newton (from Norfolk), by their own men of the Christian Commission, but he took no steps to rebuke or arrest it. We must suffer patiently to the end, when all things will be made right. Hancock kept Lee from attending divine services. By Grant's direction, he left City Point with the Second and Tenth Corps on steamers, at ten o'clock Saturday night, the 13th ofAugust, to produce the impression he was going to Washington, but disembarked at the lower pontoon bridge at Deep Bottom and marche
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Index. (search)
4. Moltke, Field-Marshal, 261, 423. Molino del Rey, 41. Monocacy, battle of, 351. Mont St. Jean, Waterloo, 421. Monroe, James, I. Montezuma's gifts, 31. Moore, Anne, 20. Morales, General, 35. Mosby, Colonel, John, 183. Mount Vernon, Ala., 99. Mount Vernon plate, 94. Mount Vernon, Va., 71. Napier, General, quoted, 148. Napoleon at Austerlitz, 247; at Waterloo, 278, 421; mentioned, 13, 17. Negro division at Petersburg, 356. New England States, 82. Newton, General, John, at Gettysburg, 286; mentioned, 362. Ney, Field-Marshal, 424. Nineteenth Corps, the, 352. Oates, Colonel, 282. On-to-Richmond movement, 327. Orange Court House, Va., 182, 183, 222, 320, 328. Ordinance of Secession, 87. Ordnance Department, the, 350. Ord's Eighteenth Corps, 359, 387. Ould, Judge, Robert, 76, 419. Palo Alto, battle of, 32. Paris, Count of, quoted, 53. Patterson, General, Robert, 38, 46, 103, 104, 105, 107, 109, 269. Paxton, General, kille