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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 18 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 18 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 13 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 13 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 2 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 10 2 Browse Search
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee 9 1 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 7 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative 7 1 Browse Search
Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley). You can also browse the collection for John Newton or search for John Newton in all documents.

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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 24 (search)
p. m. each day. The position of the front line remained unchanged until the morning of July 3, when the skirmishers of the Fortieth Ohio and Fifty-first Ohio being advanced, it was found the enemy had evacuated his works, which had been rendered almost impregnable against assault. The reserve regiments of the brigade were moved, in accordance with orders from Major-General Stanley, on the night of the 2d instant about one-half a mile to the left, and relieved General Kimball's brigade, of Newton's division. At early dawn on the 3d instant, the enemy being gone, the brigade was assembled and massed in an open field and awaited orders for pursuit. At 7 a. m., pursuant to orders, the brigade took up the line of march, bringing up the rear of the division. Leaving Marietta to the left, we proceeded down the Atlanta railroad to a point four miles south of Marietta, where the enemy was found intrenched. Here the brigade was ordered to mass into column of regiments, and encamp for the
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 27 (search)
ir position and advanced, Wood's division in front, the Twenty-third Corps on our left, and both corps struck the Macon railroad about 4 p. m., and fortified the position. My command in line on the right of the division; the Second Division (General Newton) extending my right; our corps fronting south. All quiet during the night. September 1, our division marched at 6 a. m., First Brigade in advance, moving on the railroad toward Jonesborough; and under orders spent most of the day in the des Pennsylvania, Eighty-fourth and Eightieth Illinois, and Ninth Indiana in front line-pressed forward under a heavy fire of canister from the enemy's guns to within 300 yards--of their barricaded lines. When the fighting ceased at dark one of General Newton's brigades had moved up toward my left and his skirmish line connected with the left of my front battle line. The barricades of the enemy ceased opposite the left of my lines. During the night the enemy withdrew. September 2, at early day,
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 33 (search)
, and enemy's skirmishers driven in. Our line gains a position in sight of enemy's main line, but at dark is again driven back to its old position. In this contest my regiment lost 2 killed, 7 wounded, and 1 missing. On 24th of June my regiment was relieved by Seventy-fifth Illinois and moved to left and rear in ravine. Nothing took place of any importance until the morning of the 27th, when we again move to left and occupy works of Eighty-fou rth Illinois in rear of Ninth Indiana. General Newton's division was massed in my front preparatory for a charge. At about 10 a. m. the charge is made, but our men are repulsed with quite heavy loss. My regiment was here under a heavy fire of canister, but being behind works lost no men. At night the regiment is ordered about 300 yards to rear, and bivouacked. Here I remained until the evening of July 2, when I am ordered on the front line. Take position to left of previous one. Joined on-right by Fifty-ninth Illinois, and on left by S
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 36 (search)
No. 32. reports of Brig. Gen. John Newton, U. S. Army, commanding Second Division. Hdqrs. Second Division, Fourth Army Corps, In the Field, near Peach Tree Creek, Ga., July 21, 1864. Colonel: I have the honor to transmit report of casualties sustained by my division in engagement of yesterday. I will proceed to give a more perfect account of the action. With a heavy skirmish line the ridge, one-half [mile] wide, in front of our works was taken. General Kimball's brigade moved up to the skirmish line and formed on the right-hand side of the road, Colonel Blake on the left; Colonel Bradley was along the road perpendicular to their position in order of march. As soon as Kimball's and Blake's brigades reached the top of the ridge they commenced naturally to throw up log and rail barricades, and, as the result proved, providentially. When my line of battle was formed and my troops well in hand, I ordered the skirmish line forward. They had not advanced over 150 yards
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 38 (search)
ed for the night, some of Third Brigade on my right and some of it on my left. 31st, the Twenty-third Corps came up in late morning, and at 10.30 a. m. we all advanced toward the Macon railroad. Soon crossed the headwaters of Flint River, and at dusk bivouacked in line of battle and put up defensive works. September 1, marched at 10.30 a. m., and soon came to the railroad, which we destroyed as we moved toward Jonesborough. When near the town and late in the p. m. I was ordered by General Newton to form in three lines and arrest the enemy, if possible. I was to guide right upon the Second Brigade, the Third Brigade to my left. The Seventy-fourth Illinois, Captain Bryan, was deployed as skirmishers, with orders to connect with General Wagner's left; and the Seventy-third Illinois, Major Motherspaw, was out as flankers. The brigades formed and moved forward successively as each came up from marching by the flank, which put us in echelon, and I had to protect my flank until Gen
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 42 (search)
ere until July 26. At 11 a. m. were relieved by troops of the Third Brigade, and moved one-half mile to rear in reserve. Remained at this place, in camp, until August 1. Marched 4.30 p. m., moving to left, halting at 6 p. m. near Howard house, relieving troops in the works there. Regiment went on picket in plain view of Atlanta, one and a quarter miles distant. August 2, relieved from skirmish line at 9 p. m. by the Thirty-sixth Illinois, when we moved back to the works. By order of General Newton, Col. E. Opdycke this day (August 6) assumed command of brigade. All quiet up to August 12. Regiment went on a reconnaissance at noon, advancing about 600 yards beyond the skirmish line, and losing 1 man killed. August 14, enemy shelled the camp this evening, firing rapidly, commencing at 8 p. m. and continuing until 11 p. m. No casualties occurred in the regiment. Nothing important transpired until August 17. At 7.30 p. m. moved three-quarters of a mile to the left, and occupied wo
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 47 (search)
of May, 1864, my brigade, with the rest of General Newton's division, marched from Cleveland southwaf Sunday, the 8th, pursuant to orders from General Newton, I moved my command eastward into the vallr night. On the morning of Monday, May 9, General Newton directed me to move my command into positi view from our position. In the afternoon General Newton directed me to swing my left forward, for he day before. On the morning of the 15th General Newton directed me to relieve Colonel Sherman's boon. At 2 o'clock, pursuant to orders from General Newton, I marched my brigade southward across Twoe. I remained here but a short time, when General Newton directed me to move my brigade to a point woods. We lay here for half an hour, when General Newton directed me to move forward and put my brill noon of the 23d, when I was directed by General Newton to march my brigade in the direction of thndiana and One hundredth Illinois, were by General Newton's order placed under command of the former[1 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 48 (search)
nd occupied light works constructed by a brigade of the Third Division that had secured a lodgment on the evening of the 19th on the south side of the creek. My regiment was here placed as reserve to the skirmish line. During the fore part of the day the lines were advanced and the enemy driven back, giving us possession of the ground nearly a half a mile in front of the morning's location. The enemy not making his appearance sufficiently to develop his position, I was ordered by Brigadier-General Newton to deploy the whole of my regiment as skirmishers and, facing my line to the east and starting at the Buck Head and Atlanta road, to reconnoiter the ground between that road and Pea Vine Creek. The deployment completed I advanced the line until the designated point was reached, but with a small party continued the reconnaissance still farther, but found no enemy. My line, after the brigade had moved into position and began the construction of works facing the south, was about 600
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 50 (search)
Twenty-second Illinois Infantry left for the rear to-day to be mustered out of service. On the 11th instant we moved two miles to the left and formed on the right of Baird's division, Fourteenth Corps, and fortified, and the 12th, 13th, and 14th were passed in skirmishing. On the 15th we marched at 8 a. m., and halted some hours near Pine Mountain. At 2 p. m. formed with the division in column of attack, expecting to assault the enemy's works, some distance in front. I was ordered by General Newton to form a strong skirmish line, advance, and develop the enemy's line. The Forty-second Illinois Infantry and Fifty-first Illinois Infantry were put on the skirmish line, with the Third Kentucky in support. This work was done very successfully, capturing 2 very strong lines of rifle-pits, and driving the enemy inside the main works. The brigade camped within half a mile of the enemy's works, and fortified. On the 16th that part of the brigade on the front line was relieved by regimen
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 57 (search)
er movement, the object of which was to turn our extreme left, then held by the cavalry, under General Stoneman, and the Second Division, of the Fourth Corps (General Newton). The movement was early discovered by the signal officers on the northeastern point of the crest of Rocky Face Ridge. General Newton reported his position asGeneral Newton reported his position as perilous and asked for assistance. I immediately moyed with the First and Third Biigades of the division to his support; but the reenforcement was not in the end needed, as the enemy, after a bold display of force, and apparently inviting a movement, which if boldly pushed, might have seriously interfered with our plans, drew of to work to construct a permanent bridge. The work was nearly finished by night-fall, and the remainder, by order of Major-General Howard, was turned over to General Newton's division for completion. Leaving General Hazen's brigade to hold for the night the intrenchments constructed by the First and Third Brigades on the south s
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