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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 10 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 4 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life 2 0 Browse Search
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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Book and heart: essays on literature and life, Chapter 6: Lowell's closing years in Cambridge (search)
ound in a circle where there were others besides men of letters; for in truth he had around him just such a circle, so far as it went, at home. Among his intimate friends and club-fellows were great capitalists, like John M. Forbes; men of the world, like Tom Appleton; lawyers and public men, like Judge Hoar; men of science, like Agassiz; physicians like his own brother-in-law, Dr. Estes Howe. The difference was not in quality so much as in quantity. Lowell could not perhaps say, like Stuart Newton the painter: I meet in London occasionally such company as I meet in Boston all the time ; but he could at least go so far as to say that at home he met a sufficient variety of types to know that men of letters did not monopolize the world. When it came to sheer quantity, of course London was overpowering; it was like going from a small preparatory school to Oxford; but, after all, a man usually finds, in looking back, that his own schoolmates afforded him a microcosm of the world.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 3: Girlhood at Cambridge. (1810-1833.) (search)
ed between three detached villages; and was in many respects a very pleasant place in which to be born and bred. It was, no doubt, in the current phrase of to-day, provincial ; in other words, it was not one of the two or three great capitals of the civilized world; but there are few places in any country which bring together a larger proportion of cultivated and agreeable families than must then have been found in this quiet academic suburb. One could not quite venture to say of it as Stuart Newton, the painter, said of Boston, during a brilliant London career about that period, I meet in London occasionally such society as I met in Boston all the time; but it needs only to mention some of the men who made Cambridge what it was, between 1810 and 1830, to show that my claim for the little town is not too high. Judge Story, whose reputation is still very wide, was then the head of the law school, and in the zenith of his fame; the all-accomplished Edward Everett was Greek professor
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Index. (search)
Mackie, J. M., 168. Mackintosh, Sir, James, 187, 287, 288. Mann, Horace, 11, 12. Mariana, story of, 28. Marston, J. Westland, 146, 160. Martineau, Harriet, 86, 46, 68, 122-129, 222, 223, 283, 284. Martineau, James, 221. Mary Queen of Scots, 226. Mazzini, Joseph, 5, 229, 231, 236, 244, 284. Middleton, Conyers, 50. Mill, John Stuart 146. Milman, H. H., 228. Milnes, R. M. See Houghton. Milton, John, 69. Morris, G. P., 80. Mozier, Mrs., 276. N. Neal, John, 299. Newton, Stuart, 82. Novalis (F. von Hardenburg), 46,146. Nuttall, Thomas, 88. O. Ossoli, A. P. E., birth of, 258 ; descriptions of, 269, 268, 270, 271; death of, 279. Ossoli, G. A., descriptions of, 248, 244, 247; letters from, 249. Ossoli, Sarah Margaret (Fuller), per-sonal relations of author with, 2; manuscript letters and journals of, 8; demanded something beyond self-culture, 4, 6, 87, 88, 111, 213, 808, 309, 311; reading Jefferson's correspondence, 4, 45, 87, 308; criticism on her
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, V (search)
ope, at the thought of what London and Paris might show me in the way of great human personalities; but I said to myself, To one who has heard Emerson lecture, and Parker preach, and Garrison thunder, and Phillips persuade, there is no reason why Darwin or Victor Hugo should pass for more than mortal; and accordingly they did not. We shall not prepare ourselves for a cosmopolitan standard by ignoring our own great names or undervaluing the literary tradition that has produced them. When Stuart Newton, the artist, was asked, on first arriving in London from America, whether he did not enjoy the change, he answered honestly, I here see such society occasionally, as I saw at home all the time. At this day the self-respecting American sometimes hears admissions in Europe which make him feel that we are already creating a standard, not waiting to be judged by one. The most variously accomplished literary critic in England, the late Mark Pattison, said to me of certain American books th
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, XIV (search)
quality of literary than of scientific eminence. Darwin was great, as he was certainly noble and lovable; but he was not greater, or at least held greater, than Newton:— Nature and Nature's laws lay hid in night, God said, Let Newton be, and all was light. More than this could surely not be said for Darwin; and yet how vNewton be, and all was light. More than this could surely not be said for Darwin; and yet how vague and dim is now the knowledge, even among educated men, of precisely what it was that Newton accomplished, compared with the continued knowledge held by every school-boy as to Pope, who wrote the lines just quoted. The mere record of Darwin's own life shows how large a part of man's highest mental action became inert in him. Newton accomplished, compared with the continued knowledge held by every school-boy as to Pope, who wrote the lines just quoted. The mere record of Darwin's own life shows how large a part of man's highest mental action became inert in him. He ceased to care for the spheres of thought in which Emerson chiefly lived; while, on the other hand, the tendencies and results of Darwin's thought were always an object of interest to Emerson. When we turn to Tennyson the comparison must proceed on different grounds, and takes us back to Coleridge's fine definition of inspi
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book, Index (search)
Metropolis, a literary, 77. Millais, .,. E., 53. Miller, Joaquin, 20. Millet, J. F., 53. Miles, see Houghton. Mohammed, 109, 223. Mohammed and Bonaparte, 109. Moliere, J. B. P. de, 92, 186, 229. Montagu, Elizabeth, 52. Moore, Thomas, 178, 179. Morgan, Lady, 59. Morley, John, 167. Morris, William, 68. Motley, J. L., 2, 6, 7, 36, 59, 60, 221. Motley, Preble, 222. Mozart, W. A., 188. Miller, Max, 171. Murfree, Mary N., 11, 58. N. Newton, Sir, Isaac, 125. Newton, Stuart, 49. New World and New Book, the, 1. Nichol, John, 61. Niebuhr, B. G., 4. Novalis, see Hardenberg. Norton, C. E., 179, 180, 208. O. Ossoli, Margaret Fuller, 9, 27, 90, 96, 155, 176. Ossian, 52. Osten-Sacken, Baron, 173. Oxenstiern, Chancellor, 89. P. Palmer, G. H., 148. Paris, limitations of, 82. Paris, the world's capital, 77. Parker, Theodore, 42, 62, 115,155. Parkman, Francis, 60, 61. Parton, James, 13. Pattison, Mark, 50. Paul, Jean, see Richter