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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 9 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 9 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 2 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 7.51 (search)
prisoners, and ten, including Ensign Zettick and John Collins, the pilot, were rescued by Acting-Ensign Nields. It is to the statement of Collins that the world is indebted for the account of that heinto the water and were rescued by a boat from the Metacomet, which, under charge of Acting Ensign Henry C. Nields, rowed up under the guns of the fort and through a deadly storm of shot and shell and picked them up. The gallantry of Nields's conduct was all the more striking in view of the fact that in pulling to the Tecumseh's wreck it was necessary to pass around the stern and under the broire at her, when some one standing by informed him of her character and errand. A moment later, Nields himself observed the omission, and took the flag from its case and shipped it. The rescued men were placed on board the Winnebago, and Nields and his boat's crew, unable to regain their ship, joined the Oneida, where they served during the remainder of the battle.--editors. Meantime the Brooklyn
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 44: battle of Mobile Bay. (search)
connection I must not omit to call the attention of the department to the conduct of Acting-Ensign Henry C. Nields, of the Metacomet, who had charge of the boat sent from that vessel when the Tecumseith a promptitude that reflected great credit on the discipline of the Metacomet. Acting-Ensign Henry C. Nields had charge of the boat that went on this perilous service, and steering right for th done within three hundred yards of the fort, with shot and shell falling thickly about him. Ensign Nields, not only received the warmest commendations from Admiral Farragut, but the highest admirati E. Jouett, at Mobile; Acting-Masters, Henry J. Sleeper, N. M. Dyer and C. W. Wilson; Acting-Ensigns, H. C. Nields, G. E. Wing, John White and John O. Morse; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Horace M. Harrng-Ensigns, A. L. Emerson, J. J. Butler, J. D. Ellis and H. E. Tinkham; Acting-Master's Mate, H. C. Nields; Engineers: Third-Assistants, B. C. Gowing, E. E. Roberts, L, W. Robinson and G. R. Holt.
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
, D. C. Riter; Acting-First-Assistant, G. W. Lunpkins; Acting-Second-Assistants, N. F. Johnson, Andrew Dolan and Samuel M. Sykes; Acting-Third-Assistants, Wm. T. Baxter, Wm. S. Robb, John Feihl and Martin Hilands; Acting-Gunner, J. H. Howe; Acting-Carpenter, Wm. Ostermeyer. Metacomet--Third-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, James E. Jouett; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, H. J. Sleeper; Assistant Surgeon, E. D. Payne; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, H. M. Harriman; Acting-Masters, C. C. Gill and H. C. Nields; Acting-Master and Pilot, R. Riggs; Acting-Ensigns, James Brown and R. N. Miller; Acting-Master's Mates, J. K. Goodwin and Chas. Harcourt; Engineers, First-Assistant, James Atkins; Second-Assistants, C. H. Ball and G. P. Hunt; Acting-Third-Assistants, J. H. Nash, S. W. King and Patrick Maloney; Acting-Gunner, James Lamon. Kineo--Fourth-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, John Watters; Lieutenant, Chas. S. Cotton; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, E. S. Perkins; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, Allen J.
The coolness and promptness of Lieutenant Commander Jouett throughout merit high praise; his whole conduct was worthy of his reputation. In this connection I must not omit to call the attention of the Department to the conduct of Acting Ensign Henry C. Nields, of the Metacomet, who had charge of the boat sent from that vessel, when the Tecumseh sunk. He took her in under one of the most galling fires I ever saw, and succeeded in rescuing from death ten of her crew, within six hundred yardl fleet took their stations across the channel, delivering a raking fire upon our line. Thirty-five minutes past seven, amidst the hottest of the fire, the Tecumseh was blown up. I immediately sent a boat to her assistance in charge of Acting Ensign H. C. Nields, who pulled to the spot when she sank, and succeeded in saving one acting ensign, eight men, and a pilot. It is unnecessary for me to comment upon what he did; you know the situation under which he gallantly performed this duty; he del
ins, seaman; Richard Collins, seaman; and Peter Parks, seaman. These officers are certainly in error in their statement that a row of buoys stretched from the shore a distance of one to two hundred yards. We now know, that the channel adjacent to the shore was entirely clear of torpedoes, and that the latter were placed between the two large buoys, to which I have referred in my reports. In addition to the persons named in this report as saved, the boat from the Metacomet, under Acting Ensign Nields, rescued Acting Ensign John P. Zetlich, Chauncey V. Dean, Quartermaster; Wm. Roberts, Quartermaster; James McDonald, seaman; Geo. Major, seaman; James Thorn, seaman; Chas. Packard, ordinary seaman; Wm. Fadden, landsman; and Wm. C. West, coal-heaver — with the pilot of the Tecumseh, John Collins. Four others also swam to the beach, and were taken prisoners at Fort Morgan and immediately sent away. This information was received when communicating by flag of truce with the Fort. n