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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: May 18, 1863., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
George Bancroft, History of the United States from the Discovery of the American Continent, Vol. 7, 4th edition. 6 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 6 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
John F. Hume, The abolitionists together with personal memories of the struggle for human rights 4 0 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 4 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
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surgeons, assisted by their own, to make them comfortable. We started six hundred and fifty prisoners up the river on the steamer Tycoon before the engagement closed. They left the landing amid the incessant roar of artillery and small arms, laughing, cheering, and swearing. The enemy were well armed, and provided with ammunition of an excellent quality. Our brigade was commanded by Colonel Rice, of the Thirty-third Iowa. He acquitted himself, well. Most of our wounded have been sent North, and it is painful to add that some of them cannot recover, even with the most favorable treatment. Yours truly, Thomas H. Benton, Jr. Official report. headquarters twenty-Ninth regiment Iowa volunteer infantry, Helena, Ark., July 6, 1863. Colonel: I have the honor to make the following report of the part taken in the engagement of the fourth instant, by my regiment. My men were drawn up in line of battle at daylight, in obedience to a standing order of Brig.--Gen. F. Salom
de-arms and private baggage, and the field, staff, and cavalry officers one horse each; the rank and file to be allowed all their clothing, but no other property; rations from their own stores sufficient to last them beyond our lines; the necessary cooking utensils for preparing their food; and thirty wagons to transport such articles as could not well be carried. These terms I regarded more favorable to the Government than an unconditional surrender. It saved us the transportation of them North, which at that time would have been very difficult, owing to the limited amount of river transportation on hand, and the expense of subsisting them. It left our army free to operate against Johnston, who was threatening us from the direction of Jackson; and our river transportation to be used for the movement of troops to any point the exigency of the service might require. I deem it proper to state here, in order that the correspondence may be fully understood, that after my answer to G
with any satisfaction to one's self. After a year of sad and disheartening reverses in the West, our arms have achieved a great and glorious victory. From the time General Johnston fell back from Bowling Green, Kentucky, a dark and bloody struggle has ensued, in which, on every occasion, we have fought against superior numbers, victory wavering first on one side and then on the other. Notwithstanding the disasters of the Kentucky campaign, we retrieved a portion of Middle Tennessee and North-Alabama. The battle of Murfreesboro, in which we won a brilliant victory on the thirty-first of December last, afterward proved but a drawn battle, and on the night of second January following, we retreated to Tullahoma. Several months elapsed after this terrible conflict. We advanced to Wartrace and Shelbyville, were again ready to give the enemy battle, when a large portion of General Bragg's forces were withdrawn to Mississippi for the rescue of Vicksburgh. Nothing was accomplished by
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 10: Peace movements.--Convention of conspirators at Montgomery. (search)
low it. The most obvious solution of the difficulties which spring up in this respect is to divide the old flag, giving half to each. It may be done, and in a manner to have a salutary moral effect upon both parties. Let the blue union be diagonally divided, from left to right or right to left, and the thirteen stripes longitudinally, so as to make six and a half stripes in the upper, and six and a half stripes in the lower portion. Referring to it, as on a map, the upper portion being North, and the lower portion being South, we have the upper diagonal division of the blue Northern flag. field and the upper six and a half stripes for the Northern Flag, and the lower diagonal division of the blue field and the lower six and a half stripes for the Southern Flag. The portion of the blue field in each flag to contain the stars to the number of States embraced in each confederacy. The reasons for such division are obvious. It prevents all dispute on a claim for the old flag by
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 23: siege and capture of Vicksburg and Port Hudson. (search)
d. --General Grant's Report, July 6, 1863. The 37,000 prisoners were not all captured at Vicksburg. The number there paroled, including 6,000 of the sick and wounded in the hospitals, was 27,000, of whom only 11000 were reported fit for duty. The generous terms of surrender, and the paroling of the prisoners, was complained of. Of this Grant said, in his report; These terms I regard more favorable to the Government than an unconditional surrender. It saved us the transportation of them North, which at that time would have been very difficult, owing to the limited amount of river transportation on hand, and the expense of subsisting them. it left our army free to operate against Johnston, who was threatening us from the direction of Jackson; and our river transportation to be used for the movement of troops to any point the exigency of the service might require. Its effect, in connection with the great National victory at Gettysburg, in Pennsylvania, won simultaneously, and wh
. By command of Major-General Buell: James B. Fry, Assistant Adjutant-General, Chief of Staff. headquarters, June 4, 1862. Maj. Gen. D. O. Buell: You will have f get guides from General Pope's command on their road to Danville. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. headquarters, June 4, 1862. Major-General Buell: Pope's forces are nearly all past Danville and I suppose now are near Baldwin. He expects an engagement to-day. I think you will find the road clear of Pope's troops. Lieutenant North will report to you as a guide this morning and General Pope will send others to meet you. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. Corinth, Miss., [June 4, 1862]. Major-General Buell: I directed General Wood to push forward a brigade to Tuscumbia and Florence to receive the locomotives and cars from Paducah and Saint Louis now coming up the Tennessee. He telegraphed to Colonel Kelton that he has orders from you not to pass Bear Creek. See that this is made right. Time with us now is e
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 8 (search)
he pitched into with the fervor of a Baltimorean long separated from his favorites. Gibbon is by birth a Pennsylvanian, but lived, since boyhood, in North Carolina. When the Rebellion broke out, two of his brothers went into the Rebel service, but he remained loyal. One of his sisters was in the South but could not escape, and it was only the other day that they allowed her to come on board the flag-of-truce boat and come down the river to our lines, where her brother met her and took her North. He had sent word to his younger brother to meet him on the same occasion, but the young gentleman sent word, It would not be agreeable ; which shows they are pretty bitter, some of them. Gibbon has an Inspector named Summerhayes, who is of the 20th Massachusetts, and who has got so used to being shot at, that he seems not to be able to do without it, and so gallops along the picket line to rouse the foe to pop at him. Which reminds me of what Grant said (either by accident or on purpose).
Doc. 35.-proclamations of Gov. Letcher, June 14, 1861. To the People of North-Western Virginia: The sovereign people of Virginia, unbiassed, and by their own free choice, have, by a majority of nearly one hundred thousand qualified voters, severed the ties that heretofore bound them to the Government of the United States, and united this Commonwealth with the Confederate States. That our people have the right to institute a new Government, laying its foundations on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form as to them shall seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness, was proclaimed by our fathers, and it is a right which no freeman should ever relinquish. The State of Virginia has now, the second time in her history, asserted this right, and it is the duty of every Virginian to acknowledge her act when ratified by such a majority, and to give his willing cooperation to make good the declaration. All her people have voted. Each has taken his chanc
orm if not in substance, by the action of politicians if not people — some half willing, others more than half forced-those who should have stood with sleepless zeal upon the ramparts of the Constitution ingloriously surrendered their posts, and the reign of anarchy was thus inaugurated in our own happy land. All this increased, and seriously too, the embarrassment which surrounded the question. But still the spirit of the times, the voice of the people in every section, South as well as North, demanded peace — that abstractions should be laid aside, that every substantial cause of grievance should be redressed, and that the interests of a great and prosperous nation should not be disturbed, nor the moral sense of the world shocked by a conflict of arms among brethren. There was yet hope that the cup of intestine war might in mercy be permitted to pass. The report of the first hostile gun which was discharged, however, proclaimed to the world that all chances of peaceful adjustm
bravely fought to make for us that Union, so are we now called upon to prove ourselves worthy of them by defending and preserving that Union and that flag which have proved so great a blessing to ourselves and to the world at large. Go forth, then, in the name of God, to uphold the authority of law, and to wrest from the lawless rebels this our fair land, which has been truly the land of the free and the home of the brave. Not for ourselves alone, but for the loyal hearts South as well as North; for in my heart I firmly believe there are thousands in the rebel States faithful and true, looking on and waiting with painful anxiety for the hour in which your noble efforts shall release them from the reign of terror under which they are now bowed down; and for their sakes I implore you, in the hour of victory, forget not mercy. But while, as instruments in the hands of an avenging God, you go forth to punish and subdue those who, for their own selfish ends, would sacrifice our country
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