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d Angier, Thomas Oakes, Hugh Pritchard. If any historian issues a writ of replevin, then we must appeal to lost records, or give up. In the county records we find the following names of men represented as at Medford:-- George Felt1633. James Noyes1634. Richard Berry1636. Thomas Mayhew1636. Benjamin Crisp1636. James Garrett1637. John Smith1638. Richard Cooke1640. Josiah Dawstin1641. ----Dix1641. Ri. Dexter1644. William Sargent1648. James Goodnow1650. John Martin1650. Edwardly small; and the weight of the tax was probably borne by the property of Governor Cradock, there invested for fishing and other purposes. When that establishment was withdrawn, I suppose, the town languished many years. Simon Bradstreet and James Noyes preached. The consequence of their subsequent destitution of the best means of religion were very unhappy. The town was poorly inhabited, the people much divided, occasionally prosecuted for their deficiencies, and long in a miserable condit
k. This was probably the simple organization of the civil government of Medford soon after our ancestors found themselves planted in their new homes. A more complex form of municipal agencies was not needed; especially as the celebrated Rev. James Noyes preached here a year, and established that church discipline which, in those days, took care of every body and every thing. March 8, 1631: It is ordered that all persons whatsoever that have cards, dice, or tables, in their houses shall mtensive fishery. He owned so large a part of the tract, and was so rich and distinguished, that it would have been strange if his name had not attached to it. We have wondered why it has not always been called by his name. The celebrated Rev. James Noyes became the pastor and teacher of the inhabitants of Medford in 1634. If having a Christian minister, resident and laboring in a town, completed the idea of township in those days, then Medford surely had every thing required in the definiti
t New England towns, was almost the history of their settlement. So early as 1634, our fathers procured a preacher, Mr. James Noyes, afterwards minister of Newbury. He was born in England in 1608, educated at Oxford, came to Boston in 1634, and wa gives the following account of the wedding:-- 1713, Oct. 22: I go to Salem; visit Mrs. Epes, Colonel Hathorne. See Mr. Noyes marry Mr. Aaron Porter and Miss Susan Sewall at my brother's. Was a pretty deal of company present. Mr. Hirst and wifeitchen, Mr. Samuel Porter, father of the bridegroom, I should have said before. Many young gentlemen and gentlewomen. Mr. Noyes made a speech: said, Love was the sugar to sweeten every condition in the married relation. Prayed once. Did all very he end,--five staves. I set it to Windsor tune. I had a very good turkey-leather Psalm-book, which I looked in, while Mr. Noyes read; and then I gave it to the bridegroom, saying, I give you this Psalm-book in order to your perpetuating this song
30. Locke, 530. Lyceums, 295. Lynde, 44. Magoun, 48, 360. Manners and Customs, 452. Manning, 36. Mansor, 530. Map, 421. Markham, 36, 42. Martin, 36. Mather, 205. Mayhew, 36. Maverick, 2. McClure, 49. Medford a Town, 119. Melvin, 44. Methodist Society, 270. Michelson, 42. Middlesex Canal, 295. Mills, 392. Moore, 36. Mystic Church, 273. Mystic River, 6. Name, 1. Newell, 36, 44. Norton, 74. Nowell, 3, 7, 9, 14, 37, 43. Noyes, 36, 97, 121. Nutting, 531. Oakes, 36. Oldham family, 531. Oldham, 89, 100. Oliver, 538, 570. One Hundred Laws, 101. Osgood, 236, 240, 531. Oysters, 387. Palmer, 37. Parker, 51, 52, 531. Patch family, 532. Paterson, 533. Patten family, 533. Pauperism, 441. Peirce family, 533. Pemberton, 36. Pepperrell, 538. Perkins, 534. Perry, 534. Physicians, 302. Pierpont, 262, 312. Polly, 151, 534. Ponds, 5. Population, 451. Post
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 6: Essex County. (search)
he town during the four years of the war for the payment of State aid to the families of volunteers, and which was afterwards refunded by the Commonwealth, was as follows: In 1861, $8,941.20; in 1862, $29,316.82; in 1863, $31,284.22; in 1864, $26,000.00; in 1865, $19,000.00. Total amount, $114,542.24. The Ladies' Soldiers' Relief Society of Haverhill and Bradford was formed on the 22d of April, 1861, in the chapel of the North Congregational Church, with Mrs. E. P. Hill as president, Mrs. James Noyes vice-president, and Mrs. Edmund C. Fletcher as secretary and treasurer. The lady directors were chosen from each of the religious societies, and the ladies of Bradford were invited to unite with them. Committees were also appointed to solicit subscriptions. Among the first work done by the society was making woollen shirts and fatigue uniforms for the two companies belonging to the town. One of these was Company D, which went out with the Fifth Regiment in the three months service.
t retort came: I don't care, your father is supported by the town. The town was founded in 1630, and as early as 1634 it is recorded there was preaching by Mr. James Noyes for nearly a year. He was born in England in 1608, educated at Oxford, came to Boston in 1634, and was immediately called to preach at Mistic, the name by whem, daughter of Stephen Sewell, and niece of Judge Samuel Sewell. Judge Sewell's entry in his diary, under date of October 22, is interesting: I go to Salem; see Mr. Noyes marry Mr. Aaron Porter and Miss Susan Sewell at my brother's. Was a pretty deal of company present. After naming the more distinguished among the elders, he says: Many young gentlemen and gentlewomen. Mr. Noyes made a speech: said, Love was the sugar to sweeten every condition in the married relation. After the sack-posset sung the forty-fifth Psalm from the eighth verse to the end, five staves. I set it to Windsor tune. After about nine years of ministry Mr. Porter died on Jan. 23,
Medford Historical Society Papers, Volume 15., Some errors in Medford's histories. (search)
r mentioned in the Colonial Records, over which the Bay Colony had jurisdiction. It is now within the limits of the state of Connecticut. The celebrated Rev. James Noyes became the pastor and teacher of the inhabitants of Medford in 1634. . . [P. 121.] At the first meeting of the Court of Assistants holden at Charlestown,ord a Town is based upon statements that are not in accordance with facts. Ecclesiastical History. [P. 200.] In this chapter Mr. Brooks again speaks of Mr. James Noyes as a preacher in Medford in 1634, and in a quotation says, . . . was immediately called to preach at Mistic, which he did for nearly one year. It has already, Mr. Wilson and Mr. Phillips were appointed the official ministers of six plantations, including Meadford, and these plantations were taxed for their support before Mr. Noyes was alleged to have been located in Meadford. There are many more errors to which attention might be called, but time and space forbid. —John H. Hooper