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General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox, Chapter 13: making ready for Manassas again. (search)
Gibbon, who, taking it for a cavalry annoyance to cover retreat, opened against it, and essayed aggressive fight, till he found himself engaged against a formidable force of infantry and artillery. He was assisted by part of Doubleday's brigade, and asked for other assistance, which failed to reach him, till night came and ended the contest. His fight was desperate and courageous against odds, but he held it and his line till dark. His loss was seven hundred and fifty-one, including Colonel O'Connor and Major May, mortally wounded, with many other officers with lighter hurts. Rebellion Record, vol. XII. part II. p. 378. General Doubleday joined the fight with his brigade, and reported his loss nearly half of the troops engaged. General Gibbon called it a surprise. Rebellion Record, vol. XII. part II. p. 381. And well he might, after his division commander had just passed over the route and failed to find any indication of the lurking foe. General Jackson reported, The
turn to camp I learned that Beever had never reported, and we had just grounds to believe him lost. Guns were fired and rockets sent up, but our friend did not return. At noon on the thirtieth of July, a detachment consisting of companies A, I, and K, of the Sixth regiment, commanded by Captains Grant, Slaughter, and Braden; A, B, and H of the Seventh, commanded by Captains Arnold, Gillfillan, and Stevens, and B, F, and K of the Tenth infantry, commanded by Captains Edgerton, White, and O'Connor, and companies L and M of the cavalry, commanded by Captain Davy and Lieutenant Johnson; Lieutenant Whipple's and Lieutenant Dwelle's sections of the battery, together with a detachment of company A, Ninth regiment infantry as pioneers, under Lieutenant Jones; the whole under my command, was ordered to proceed to the place where I had been the day before, with directions to destroy the transportation left by the Indians, and to find the body of Lieutenant Beever and that of private Miller,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 17: Pope's campaign in Virginia. (search)
-ninth (Highlanders) New York, with the colors of that regiment, which had fallen from the hands of a wounded sergeant. In the Second battle of Bull's Run, on the 30th, Colonel Fletcher Webster, son of Daniel Webster, fell; and, on the same day, Colonel George W. Pratt, of the Twentieth New York, son of the Honorable Zadock Pratt, was mortally wounded near Gainesville. On the same day Colonel Broadhead, of the regular Army, received his death-wound on the Bull Run battle-ground; also Colonels O'Connor, Cantwell, and Brown. Among the wounded were Major-General Robert C. Schenck, and Colonel Hardin, of the Pennsylvania Reserves. the National loss in Pope's campaign, from the battle of Cedar Mountain to that of Chantilly, was never officially reported in full. The most careful estimates make it, including the immense number of stragglers who never returned to their regiments, almost 30,000. Lee's losses during that time amounted probably to 15,000. he claimed to have taken 7,000
his losses from the 23d to the 30th of August, inclusive, at 4,725. A. P. Hill reports the losses in his division, from the 24th to the 31st, at 1,548. Probably the entire Rebel loss from Cedar Mountain to Chantilly did not fall short of 15,000 men; while Pope's, if we include that by stragglers who never rejoined their regiments, must have been fully double that number. Among our killed, beside those already named, were Cols. Fletcher Webster, son of the great Daniel, Roberts, 1st Mich., O'Connor, 2d Wise., Koltes, 73d Pa., commanding a brigade, Cantwell, 82d Ohio, and Brown, 20th Ind. Among our wounded on the 30th, were Maj.-Gen. Robert C. Schenck and Col. Hardin, of the Pa. Reserves. Among the Rebels wounded in these fights, were Brig.-Gens. Field and Trimble, and Cols. Forno and Baylor, commanding brigades. How far Pope's disasters are justly attributable to his own incapacity, and how far to the failure or withholding of support on which he had a right to calculate, it is t
's corps, 171. Newton, Gen., at Gaines's Mill, 156; is relieved, 564. New York City, fired by emissaries, 611. New York Riots of 1863, account of, 503-7. New York. State Election of 1862, 484. Niagara, U. S. frigate, takes the Georgia, 646. Niagara, Peace overtures at, 665. Norfolk, Va., capture of, 127-8. North Anna river, Grant advances to the, 577. North Carolina, Burnside's operations in, 73-81. O. O'Brien, Col., killed in New York by rioters, 506. O'Connor, Col., 2d Wise., killed at second Bull Run, 189. Ohio, Gen. Buell commands the Army of the, 212. Ohio, Morgan's raid into, 405; Ohio Democracy vs. President Lincoln, 493. Oliver, Col., at the siege of Corinth, 225. Olustee, Fla., Gen. T. Seymour defeated at. 531. Opdycke, Gen., his heroism at Franklin, 682. Opequan, Va., Sheridan's victory at, 606. Ord, Gen. Edward O. C., at Iuka, 223; at Vicksburg, 315; at Petersburg, 784. order of American Knights, their organizati
k down; the bearer of the State color--Sergt. Fitzgibbons--had the staff shot away and his hand shattered, and in a few moments afterward was shattered in both thighs while waving his color on the broken staff. The bearer of the National color--Sergt. O'Connor--was, at the same time, struck down by some missile, but recovered himself in a short time, and kept waving his colors in front of the enemy's fire; about this time I received a wound in the leg, the ball passing through and killing my hoattle ended. Color-Sergeant Fitzgibbons, who was behind the colonel when he fell, had his right hand shattered, but gathering the Stars and Stripes in his left, he waved them again enthusiastically, and was torn to pieces by a round shot. Sergeant O'Connor snatched the falling colors, and again held them aloft, when he was also struck by a ball in his left hand, but he dropped behind a log, and kept the colors flying until exhaustion compelled him to drop them. His captain, Stephen McGroarty
g at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Sloan, of the Fifty-third Georgia; Colonel Jones, of the Twenty-second Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Crowder, badly, of the Thirty-first Georgia; Major Lewis, Captains Harney and St. Martin, and Lieutenants Murphy, Cook, Current, Dea, Montgomery, Bryant, Wren, Birdsall, and McJimsey, of the Eighth Louisiana; Colonel Penn, Captains Frank Clark and O'Connor, and Lieutenants Smith, Orr and Martin, of the Sixth Louisiana; Captains Herrin, Morgan and Harper, and Lieutenants Knox, Tarpey, Flower, Talbot, and Wells, of the Seventh Louisiana; Major Menger, Captain Hart and Lieut. Patterson, of the Fifth Louisiana; Colonel Hately, Lieutenant-Colonel T. B. Lamar, Sergeant-Major Anderson, of the Fifth Florida; Captain Gregory, and privates Hagin, Henry, Bryant, Parker, Strickland, Bateman, Yon, Barnett, Dillard and Martin, of company H, of the same reg
g at Boonesboro Gap;) Colonel Alfred Cumming, of the Tenth Georgia; Major Tracy, badly, and Captain Watson, of the Sixth Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Sloan, of the Fifty-third Georgia; Colonel Jones, of the Twenty-second Georgia; Lieutenant-Colonel Crowder, badly, of the Thirty-first Georgia; Major Lewis, Captains Harney and St. Martin, and Lieutenants Murphy, Cook, Current, Dea, Montgomery, Bryant, Wren, Birdsall, and McJimsey, of the Eighth Louisiana; Colonel Penn, Captains Frank Clark and O'Connor, and Lieutenants Smith, Orr and Martin, of the Sixth Louisiana; Captains Herrin, Morgan and Harper, and Lieutenants Knox, Tarpey, Flower, Talbot, and Wells, of the Seventh Louisiana; Major Menger, Captain Hart and Lieut. Patterson, of the Fifth Louisiana; Colonel Hately, Lieutenant-Colonel T. B. Lamar, Sergeant-Major Anderson, of the Fifth Florida; Captain Gregory, and privates Hagin, Henry, Bryant, Parker, Strickland, Bateman, Yon, Barnett, Dillard and Martin, of company H, of the same reg
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 3. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 5.38 (search)
mpletely crushed. General Kirby Smith surrendered his forces in the Trans-Mississippi Department to General Canby at Baton Rouge. My very last hope has gone. What shall I do? If the alternative of banishment from the country was offered, I would unhesitatingly accept it. But it is the hated oath of allegiance or perpetual imprisonment. Both are terrible, revolting. June 1st to 5th A novel, called Too strange not to be true, received from Miss McSherry, and promptly read. Farther O'Connor, of Philadelphia, made a visit to the Catholic prisoners. It is a notable fact that no Protestant minister in the entire North has ever, to my knowledge, visited the prison. A few Catholic priests have been more considerate. The Prison Christian association has weekly lectures from its members. Colonel Hinton delivered a very fine one on Benevolence. Rev. Mr. Kinsolving, Captain Harris and others will doubtless follow. Prayers continue to be offered by some officer in each division at
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), California (search)
, elected for the long term to Congress, with Judge Johnson S. Hayes, anti-railroad Democrat, for the short term......Dec. 20, 1873 Law empowering juries to determine between death and imprisonment for life in convicting of a capital crime......1874 Compulsory education law passed and school laws revised; a State superintendent of instruction to be elected......1874 State temperance convention at San Francisco......Nov. 19, 1874 State capitol at Sacramento completed......1875 O'Connor bill becomes a law, authorizing three commissioners of transportation to inspect railroads and require them to be kept in safe condition. April 3, 1876 Permanent organization of the workingmen's party of California, Dennis Kearney, the sand-lot orator, president, headquarters at San Francisco......Oct. 5, 1877 Dennis Kearney arrested and imprisoned two weeks for incendiary speeches and threats......Nov. 3, 1877 Act amending the code of civil procedure concerning attorneys, by st
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