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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 19 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: April 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1 2 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1. You can also browse the collection for Oglethorpe or search for Oglethorpe in all documents.

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William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 35: the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
ows whether the Black family will increase in freedom? Every fact appears to point another way. The Whites are recruited from Europe, the Blacks are not recruited from Africa. One force expands, the other wanes. Yet what a power of mischief this low and waning branch of the human family possesses; a power which wounds and weakens every section of America; setting brother against brother, North against South, the disciples of Brewster against the comrades of Raleigh, and the children of Oglethorpe against the descendants of Penn. This question- How, in our advance towards a higher plane of freedom, culture, and refinement, shall we treat those races on our soil which stand on the lowest stages of freedom, culture, and refinement? --has already wrecked a third part of America, putting back for unknown terms of years the noble work which the Republic inherited from her English founders — that of planting and peopling this continent with Free States. Born in the South, and trai