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William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 27 1 Browse Search
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William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 4: (search)
th before Van Dorn could reach it. He had drawn Ord to Corinth, and moved him by Burnsville on Iukahe Jacinto and Fulton roads. On the 18th General Ord encountered the enemy about four miles out d, and the next morning was gone. Although General Ord must have been within four or six miles of had a sharp fight until night closed in. General Ord was to the north with an armed force of abod of the endurance of the troops under him. General Ord's command showed untiring zeal, but the dirs; the one to the left, commanded by Major-General O. E. C. Ord. On the night of the 18th the latteue instantly, notifying him that he had ordered Ord's and Hurlbut's divisions rapidly across to Pocebels in flank. On the morning of the 5th, General Ord reached Hatchie River at Davis' bridge, witgot possession of the heights with our troops. Ord took two batteries and about two hundred prisonGeneral H. W. Halleck, Washington, D. C. Generals Ord and Hurlbut came on the enemy's rear yester[1 more...]
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 11: (search)
ousand (25,000) effective men, and operate directly against Lee's army wherever it may be found. Sigel collects all his available force in two columns—one, under Ord and Averill, to start from Beverly, Virginia; and the other, under Crooke, to start from Charleston, on the Kanawha, to move against the Virginia & Tennessee Railroad. Crooke will have all cavalry, and will endeavor to get in about Saltville and move east from there to join Ord. His force will be all cavalry, while Ord will have from ten to twelve thousand men of all arms. You I propose to move against Johnston's army, to break it up, and to get into the interior of the enemy's country asOrd will have from ten to twelve thousand men of all arms. You I propose to move against Johnston's army, to break it up, and to get into the interior of the enemy's country as far as you can, inflicting all the damage you can against their war resources. I do not propose to lay down for you a plan of campaign, but simply to lay down the work it is desirable to have done, and leave you free to execute in your own way. Submit to me, however, as early as you can, your plan of operations. As stated Ba