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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli 46 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 22 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature 12 0 Browse Search
Margaret Fuller, Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (ed. W. H. Channing) 12 0 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men 4 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Higginson, Thomas Wentworth 1823- (search)
Higginson, Thomas Wentworth 1823- Author; born in Cambridge, Mass., Dec. 22, 1823; graduated at Harvard College in 1841; became pastor of the First Congregational Church in Newburyport, Mass., in 1847. In 1858 he gave up the ministry for literature. He entered the National army in September, 1862, and was made colonel of the 33d Colored Regiment in Thomas Wentworth Higginson. the same year. This regiment comprised the first freed slaves received into the National army. He was wounded at Willtown Bluffs, S. C., in August, 1863, and resigned in the following year. His publications include Army life in a Black Regiment; Young folks' history of the United States; History of education in Rhode Island; Young folks' book of American explorers; Short studies of American authors; Life of Margaret Fuller Ossoli (in American men of letters series, 1884) ; Larger history of the United States, etc.
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 1: Margaret Fuller Ossoli — Introductory. (search)
Chapter 1: Margaret Fuller Ossoli — Introductory. It has long been my desire to write a new memoir of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, a person whose career is more interesting, as it seems to me, than that of any other American of her sex; a woman whose aims were high and whose services great; one whose intellect was uncommon, whose activity incessant, whose life varied, and whose death dramatic. Thirty years having passed since the publication of her Memoirs, it has seemed possible that a biograMargaret Fuller Ossoli, a person whose career is more interesting, as it seems to me, than that of any other American of her sex; a woman whose aims were high and whose services great; one whose intellect was uncommon, whose activity incessant, whose life varied, and whose death dramatic. Thirty years having passed since the publication of her Memoirs, it has seemed possible that a biography might now be written almost wholly from new or unused material, thus affording a positive addition to what was before known of her, and not a mere restatement of what was already before the public. In this aspect, at least, the effort has been successful, nearly every citation in the book being from manuscript sources; and the study of these materials having in all respects controlled the delineation here given of her life. Recognizing the great value of the portraiture already drawn of h
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Chapter 15: marriage and motherhood. (1847-1850.) (search)
ready been said, was the younger sister of Madame Ossoli. Legation des États-unis d'amerique. Romennected with my acquaintance with the late Madame Ossoli, your deceased sister, during her residencntered Rome, and, the gates being opened, Madame Ossoli, accompanied by the Marquis, immediately p it rested for some weeks, during which we saw Ossoli pale, dejected, and unhappy. He was always wialready described in Mr. Cass's letter,--while Ossoli was in the army outside the city. One day, afmpanion in nature was ever so much to me as is Ossoli; does not this show that his soul was deep andanxiety about meeting the expenses, etc., etc. Ossoli is a devoted lover; he is all kindness and att upon wine and bread, and this at the time when Mr. and Mrs. Ossoli were shut up in Rome, during thMrs. Ossoli were shut up in Rome, during the siege. When, at last, she could leave Rome and go into the country to see him, she found him quiorence, where he has regained his health. Mr. Ossoli does not speak English, not even a sentence,[7 more...]
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Bibliographical Appendix: works of Margaret Fuller Ossoli. (search)
Bibliographical Appendix: works of Margaret Fuller Ossoli. Books. 1. Correspondence with Goethe in the Last Years of his Life. Translated from the German of Eckermann. Boston, 1839. 2. Correspondence of Fraulein Gunderode and Bettine von Arnim. Boston, 1842. [Reprinted, with additions, by Mrs. Minna Wesselhoeft. Bioned above. Liberty Bell (Anti-Slavery annual, 1846). The Liberty Bell (prose essay). Publications concerning her. Biographies. 1. Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, by R. W. Emerson, W. H. Channing, and J. F. Clarke, 2 vols. Boston, 1852. [Edited mainly by W. H. Channing. Reprinted at New York, 1869; at Boston, 1884.] 2. Margaret Fuller (Marchesa Ossoli), by Julia Ward Howe. [ Eminent women series.] Boston, 1883. 3. Margaret Fuller Ossoli, by Thomas Wentworth Higginson. [ American men of letters series.] Boston, 1884. Briefer memoirs and sketches. Crosland, Mrs. N. In Memorable women. London, 1854. Dall, Mrs, C. H. In His
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Index. (search)
, 224. Austin, Sarah. 189. Autobiographical romance, 21,22,309. B. Bachi, Pietro, 33. Bacon, Lord, 45. Baillie, Joanna, 229 Ballou, Adin, 180. Bancroft, G., 33, 47, 48, 50, 108, 144. Barker. See Ward. Barlow, D. H., 39. Barlow, Mrs. D. H., letters to, 39, 54, 62, 94, 154. Barlow, F. C., 39. Barrett, Miss. See Browning. Bartlett, Robert, 138. 144, 146. Bartol, C. A., 142, 144. Beck, Charles, 33. Belgiojoso, Princess, 236. Baranger, J. P. de, 230. Birthplace of Madame Ossoli, 20. Bolivar, Simon, 15. Bonaparte, Napoleon, 13, 15. Bracebridge, Mr. and Mrs., 224. Bradford, George P., 144. Brentano, Bettina. See Arnis Briggs, Miss, 225. Brook Farm, 173. Brown, Charles Brockden, 132. Brown, Samuel, 226. Brown's Philosophy studied, 24. Browne, M. A., 39. Browning, Elizabeth (Barrett), 220, 314. Browning, Robert, 19, 69, 220, 229. Brownson, 0. A., 142-144, 147, 148. Brutus, defense of, 47-50. Bryant, William Cullen, 131. Buckingham, J.
but to belong rather to some small hamlet of western Massachusetts. Yet it recalls with instantaneous vividness the scenes of my youth, and is the very spot through which Holmes, and Lowell, and Richard Dana, and Story the sculptor, and Margaret Fuller Ossoli, walked daily to the post-office, or weekly to the church. The sketch was taken in the year before my own birth, but remained essentially unchanged for ten years thereafter, the population of the whole town having increased only from 329 it to identify his village monarch, Ready Money Jack, with the broad shoulders and yeomanlike bearing of old Emery Willard, reputed the strongest man in the village, who kept the wood-yard just across Brighton Bridge. In my memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli I have attempted to sketch the cultivated women who lived in Cambridge and were a controlling power. Mrs. Farrar, Mrs. Norton, Mrs. Howe, Mrs. King, and others,—of whom Miss Fuller herself was the representative in the next generation,—a
c schools, in short, were as much for girls as for boys; so that we have in this rule of 1832 an official recognition of what had been gradually coming into practice in Cambridge,—co-education in high school subjects. Years before this date ambitious girls might have been found here and there, more frequently in private schools than in public, working close up to the college doors, although it was hopeless for them to enter there, like Margaret Fuller, of Cambridgeport, subsequently Countess Ossoli, who in 1816, at the age of six, was studying Latin with her father, and whom we see again nine years later reciting Greek in the C. P. P. G. S., that is, in the Cambridge Port Private Grammar School,—a school for classical instruction where Richard Henry Dana and Oliver Wendell Holmes were among her schoolmates. Here was coeducation in secondary subjects, though not in a public school, as early as 1825. In the same year a high school for girls was opened in Boston. Its very success
atory, 75, 76. Odd-Fellowship, its position, 285; strength and popularity, 285; first founded in England, 285; first American lodge, 285; its purpose, 285; its motto and aim, 285; its work, 285; Cambridge organizations, 286; buildings, 286. Old Cambridge, 2. See New Town. Oldest Cambridge, 2. See New Town. Old-time Society, An, 267-274. Old Villagers, 60. Olive Branch Rebekah Lodge, 286. Oliver, Thomas, lieutenant-governor, 23; his promise to Cambridge citizens, 24. Ossoli, Margaret Fuller, 35. Overseers of the Poor, 403. Owen, John, 51. Paige, Rev. Lucius R., 276, 281, 284. Palisade at the New Town, 5, 8, 133; Watertown refuses to share the expense of building, 8; needed as a protection from wild beasts, 8. Park Commissioners, 403. Parks, committee to consider the subject of, 120; public grounds in 1892, 120; their inadequacy, 120; Park Commissioners appointed, 120; the beginnings of their work, 120; Broadway Common, 121; the East Cambridge
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Women and Men, Index. (search)
e, 180. Fontenelle, B. le B. de, quoted, 85. Francomania, 26. Franklin, Benjamin, 296. Freeman, Alice, 21. French standards vs. English, 23, 98. Frenchmen, domesticity of, 281. Friends, marriages among, 47. Fuller, Margaret. See Ossoli. Furies, the, 44. G. Galahad, Sir, 296. Gallenga, A., 98. Garibaldi, Giuseppe, 309. Garrison, W. L., 18, 177. Garth, Caleb, 294. Gellius, Aulus, quoted, 97. Genlis, Madame de, 57, 179. German schools, drawbacks of, 246. Ger Northcote, Sir, Stafford, 136. Norton, Andrews, 18. Norton, C. E., 18. novels: men's and women's, 156. Nursery, a model, 264. O. Odyssey, Palmer's, 248. Opie, Amelia, 157. Orestes, 44. Organizing mind, the, 146. Ossoli, Margaret Fuller, quoted, 211, 232. Outside of the shelter, 7. P. Paganini, Nicolo, 238. Palma, Jacopo (Vecchio), 307. Palmer, Professor G. H., 248. Parnell, C. S., 272. Parochialism, 222. Patience quoted, 51. Peabody Museum of Amer
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Letters and Journals of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Chapter 1: Cambridge and Newburyport (search)
she probably married him as a representative of an imagined possibility in the Italian character which I have not yet been able to believe in. He [Count Ossolil is very handsome, of Spanish rather than Italian aspect. He speaks no English, sits at home in the evening in a military frock, and when her visitors come in, goes to a cafe. He will no doubt be thoroughly miserable in America, whither they go in a few months. . . . But above all he describes a visit to the Brownings, to whom Madame Ossoli introduced him. They live in the most charming way, in a large old palace with a great parlor in which they sit in the evening; on the one side a large fireplace with an open fire, close to which sits Mrs. Browning, almost lost in a large armchair; on the opposite side sits her husband, and between them is a third chair for a guest, as they rarely have more than one at a time. On the opposite side of the room are ranged her bookshelves full of well-thumbed books including many Greek one
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