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t, there were still a large number of non-combatants included in the present for duty, a large number of men detailed on special duties — too often, contrary to orders; and in case of a hard march, immediately preceding a battle, many fell out from inability to keep up, to say nothing of disinclination. General McClellan, in his official report of the battle of Antietam, carelessly states the strength of his army at 87,164, when it is doubtful if he had 60,000 muskets on the field. Gen. F. W. Palfrey: The Antietam and Fredericksburg, p. 70. Yet the morning reports would justify his statement. Let it be hoped that, in the future wars of the Republic, the army may have its corps of intendants, as in the German Army that every wearer of the national uniform shall be a man-at-arms, serving as such only; and that the men attached to the trains and all other subsidiary departments shall be enlisted for such service and wear a different uniform. Then a morning report will be some indi
rg, winning especial mention in the histories of that battle; its casualties there were 9 killed, 61 wounded, andl 7 missing, out of 141 engaged. During the Wilderness campaign it was in Webb's (1st) Brigade, Gibbon's (2d) Division, and fought in all the subsequent battles of the Second Corps. Twentieth Massachusetts Infantry. Hall's Brigade — Gibbon's Division--Second Corps. (1) Col. William R. Lee; Bvt. Brig. Gen. (3) Col. Paul Revere (Killed); Bvt. Brig. Gen. (2) Col. Francis W. Palfrey; Bvt. Brig. Gen. (4) Col. George N. Macy; Bvt. Major-Gen. companies. killed and died of wounds. died of disease, accidents, in Prison, &c. Total Enrollment. Officers. Men. Total. Officers. Men. Total. Field and Staff 6   6       24 Company A   27 27   23 23 248   B   12 12   13 13 229   C 2 17 19   16 16 137   D   32 32   6 6 217   E 3 19 22   18 18 118   F 2 28 30 1 7 8 238   G   21 21   23 23 159   H 2 29 31   10 10 218
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington, Chapter 15: Confederate losses — strength of the Confederate Armies--casualties in Confederate regiments — list of Confederate Generals killed — losses in the Confederate Navy. (search)
574 Officers killed, proportion of, to enlisted men 38, 48 Officers killed, greatest regimental loss in 39 Officers killed, greatest loss in, by brigades 480 Officers, deaths among, from disease 40, 48 Ohio regiments, tabulation of, with loss in each 491 Ohio regiments, reenlistments in 494 Ohio quota of troops 492 Ohio generals, prominent 495 Ohio squirrel hunters 494 Ohio State National Guard 493 Organization of regiments, size, strength, etc. 5 Palfrey, Gen. F. W., quoted 34 Paine's Division, colored 55 Pennsylvania Reserves 114 Pennsylvania nine-months' regiments, casualties in 488 Pennsylvania regiments, tabulated list of, with loss in each 483 Pennsylvania regiments, peculiar numbering of 484 Pennsylvania regiments, synonyms of 485 Pennsylvania soldiers, first to arrive at Washington 487 Pennsylvania soldiers at Gettysburg 488 Pennsylvania, highest percentage of killed of any State 484 Percentage of killed from
alogical and biographical Society and of American Ethnological Society. Brevet Major-General William B. Hazen, chief signal officer, raised 41st Ohio volunteers; marched with Sherman to the sea; commanded 15th Army Corps; U. S Military Attache to France. Major-General Carl Schurz. Major-General Lewis Wallace. Colonel George E. Waring, Jr., led a brigade of Cavalry; reorganized Street Cleaning system of New York City; died in Havana, Cuba, fighting Yellow fever. Brevet Brigadier-General Francis W. Palfrey, register in Bankruptcy in 1872; author of Antietam and Fredericksburg in 1882; author of many Scholarly and important papers. Lieutenant E. Benjamin Andrews: wounded at Petersburg, 1864; professor of History and political History, Brown University, 1882-88; President thereof, 1889-98. Brevet Brigadier-General Francis A. Walker, superintendent Ninth and Tenth Censuses; commissioner of Indian affairs in 1872; President, Mass. Institute of Technology, 1881. well as th
t. 26, 1865. O'Brien, Geo. M., Mar. 13, 1865. O'Dowd, John, Mar. 13, 1865. Oley, John H., Mar. 13, 1865. Oliphant, S. D., June 27, 1865. Oliver, Paul A., Mar. 8, 1865. Olmstead, W. A., April 9, 1865. Ordway, Albert, Mar. 13, 1865. Osband, E. D., Oct. 5, 1864. Osborn, F. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Otis, Calvin N., Mar. 13, 1865. Otis, Elwell S., Mar. 13, 1865. Otis, John L., Mar. 13, 1865. Ozburn, Lyndorf, Mar. 13, 1865. Packard, Jasper, Mar. 13, 1865. Painter, Wm., Mar. 13, 1865. Palfrey, F. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Palmer, Oliver H., Mar. 13, 1865. Confederate generals—No. 21 Texas Walter P. Lane led a brigade of Cavalry West of the Mississippi. William P. Hardeman led a brigade on Magruder's Army. Lawrence S. Ross commanded a brigade in Wheeler's Cavalry. Walter H. Stevens, chief Engineer, Army of Northern Virginia. Elkanah Greer commanded the Reserve Corps, Trans-Mississippi Department. A. P. Bagby, originally Colonel of the 7th Cavalry; later led
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Literary notices. (search)
by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. John C. Palfrey, U. S. A.; The period which elapsed between the siege of Yorktown and the beginning of the seven-days battles, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Francis W. Palfrey, U. S. V.; The seven-days battles.--to Malvern Hill, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Francis W. Palfrey, U. S. V.; The battle of Malvern Hill, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen.Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Francis W. Palfrey, U. S. V.; The battle of Malvern Hill, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Francis W. Palfrey, U. S. V.; Comments on the Peninsular campaign, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Charles A. Whittier, U. S. V. Sent postpaid, on receipt of price, by the publishers, James R. Osgood & Co., Boston. We are also indebted to the publishers for a copy of this beautifully gotten up book, which we have not yet found time to Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Francis W. Palfrey, U. S. V.; Comments on the Peninsular campaign, by Bvt. Brig.-Gen. Charles A. Whittier, U. S. V. Sent postpaid, on receipt of price, by the publishers, James R. Osgood & Co., Boston. We are also indebted to the publishers for a copy of this beautifully gotten up book, which we have not yet found time to read, and a review of which we must reserve for the future.
tain Arthur F. Devereux, of Salem, who commanded a company in the Eighth Regiment in the three months service, was commissioned lieutenant-colonel; and Major Henry J. How, of Haverhill, a graduate of Harvard College, class of 1859, who was killed in battle June 30, 1862, was commissioned major. The Twentieth Regiment was recruited at Camp Massasoit, Readville, and left the State for Washington on the 4th of September, 1861. William Raymond Lee, of Roxbury, a graduate of West Point; Francis W. Palfrey, of Boston, son of Hon. John G. Palfrey; and Paul J. Revere, of Boston,—were chiefly instrumental in raising the regiment: and they were commissioned, severally, colonel, lieutenant-colonel, and major. The roster of this regiment contains the names most distinguished in the history of Massachusetts. The Twentieth bore a prominent part in the disastrous Battle of Ball's Bluff, Oct. 21, 1861. Many of the officers were killed and wounded. Colonel Lee, Major Revere, and Adjutant Charle
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Henrietta Sargent. (search)
transcendentalism. The German philosophy would suit it best. The letter was written on some subject of much interest to the writer, and under a rather agreeable state of feeling. The first impression conveyed, on touching this letter, was that of goodness, purity, and intelligence of the highest order. I send it to you as it was sent to me by the agent of the Courier. As you seemed to be curious on this subject of neurology, I thought it would gratify your curiosity to see it. Dr. Palfrey called on me, on his way to New Orleans. I agreed to find places for five of his slaves, and have done so. He behaved nobly. His brothers offered to let him take his share in real estate; and that would have satisfied the conscience of most people; but he at once answered that be should consider such an arrangement equivalent to selling the slaves; and begged that as many slaves as possible might be put into his share. He told me that he had some fears as to how Mrs. P. would approve o
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), To Miss Lucy Osgood. (search)
of me as an author, I am glad that you think of me as an alive author; for so long as I write at all, I desire to be very much alive. This is the second time I have walked out in stormy weather without a cloak. My Appeal in favor of anti-slavery, and attacking colonization, marched into the enemy's camp alone. It brought Dr. Channing to see me, for the first time; and he told me it had stirred up his mind to the conviction that he ought not to remain silent on the subject. Then came Dr. Palfrey, who, years afterward, said that the emancipation of his slaves might be traced to the impulse that book had given him. Charles Sumner writes me that the influence of my anti-slavery writings years ago has had an important effect on his course in Congress. . . . Who can tell how many young minds may be so influenced by the Progress of Religious Ideas as to materially change their career? I trust I have never impelled any one in the wrong direction. In the simplest things I write, whethe
Lydia Maria Child, Letters of Lydia Maria Child (ed. John Greenleaf Whittier, Wendell Phillips, Harriet Winslow Sewall), Index. (search)
42 ; lives with Isaac T. Hopper's family; 48 ; interest in New Church doctrines, 43; letters of Dr. Channing to, 44, 45; her reminiscences of Dr. Channing, 48: life in New York, 50-60 ; characterization of, by Rev. Mr. Kent, 55; interview with Dr. Palfrey, 56: reads Emerson's e-says, 57; her admiration of Domenichino's Cumaean Sibyl, 57; has a birthday celebration, 59; her views on a salaried priesthood, 61; reads the Countess of Rudolstaat, 62; dislikes letters of introduction, 63; her enjoymeel Johnson, 214. Osceola, the Seminole chief, 219. Osgood, Miss, Lucy, letters to, 61, 76, 80, 81, 84, 89, 91, 95, 99, 139, 143, 162, 169, 174, 179, 185, 188, 192, 200, 203, 204, 209, 211, 212, 214. P. Paine, Thomas, grave of, 16. Palfrey, John G. D. D., liberates the slaves bequeathed to him, 56; influenced by Mrs. Child's Appeal, 77. Parker, Theodore, his first return from Europe, 57; farewell note to Mrs. Child, 139; Weiss's biography of, 179; magnetic power of, 191.
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