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Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 3, Chapter 13: the Bible Convention.—1853. (search)
place been filled by Charles G. Atherton, of gag memory. Mr.Ante, 2.247-249. Hale's political attitude towards slavery, under the compromises of the Constitution, certainly had not been acceptable to the abolitionists; but his solitary courage amid a contemptuous and murderous pro-slavery body like the Senate of the United States deserved, and had always received, recognition in the Liberator. Mr. Lib. 23:[83]. Garrison, therefore, took his place without scruple beside Charles Sumner, John G. Palfrey, Horace Mann, Henry Wilson, Anson Burlingame, Richard H. Dana, Jr., John Jay, and Joshua Leavitt. On Cassius Clay's offering the toast—The True Union: To Benton, to Bryant, to T. H. Benton. W. C. Bryant. W. H. Seward. H. Greeley. Seward, to Greeley, to Garrison, to Phillips, to Quincy— the union of all the opponents of the propaganda of slavery, there were loud calls for Garrison, who responded with peculiar felicity, paying just tributes to Hale and to Lib. 23.74. Clay, The firs
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 4: College Life.—September, 1826, to September, 1830.—age, 15-19. (search)
ng the evening on the bed, like Abelard and Eloisa on their monument. Sumner competed for the Bowdoin prize in his Senior year, the subject being, The Present Character of the Inhabitants of New England, as Resulting from the Civil, Literary, and Religious Institutions of the First Settlers. In June, he sent in his dissertation, signed, A Son of New England; and, in August, received the second prize of thirty dollars. The committee of award were John Pickering, George Ticknor, and Rev. John G. Palfrey. The tradition is that Sumner's dissertation suffered in the comparison from its great length. Its style, while well-formed, lacks the felicity of expression and fastidiousness in the choice of language which mark his compositions in mature life. In method, it is manly and serious, never trivial, but wanting in condensation. He was, as a living classmate remarks, too full of matter. His citations and extracts show that he left nothing unread which could illustrate the subject, an
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 6: Law School.—September, 1831, to December, 1833.—Age, 20-22. (search)
mons. The first meeting was held March 6, and the officers were chosen March 14. Mercantile Journal, March 16, 1833. Sumner was chosen President; Abiel A. Livermore, of the Divinity School, Vice-President; and Samuel Osgood, of the Divinity School, Secretary. Among the members of the Executive Committee were Barzillai Frost, of the Divinity School, and Richard H. Dana, Jr., of the Sophomore Class. Public meetings were held in the City Hall, or one of the churches; at one of which Rev. John G. Palfrey delivered an impressive address, still well remembered for its effective reference to graduates of the college who had fallen victims to the vice. He then, for the first time, met Sumner, who presided; and was attracted by his manly presence and genial smile. In the autumn of 1833, Sumner invited George S. Hillard to repeat before the society a temperance lecture which he had delivered in other places. Rev. A. A. Livermore, of Meadville, Penn., a living officer of the society, wr
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 7: study in a law office.—Visit to Washington.—January, 1854, to September, 1834.—Age, 23. (search)
e Law School; but not till then. If such a chance should occur, the judge would be one of the foremost to relinquish his hold on you. A few weeks before Sumner's admission to the bar, the Ursuline Convent at Charlestown was burned, Aug. 11, by a mob. The authorities of Harvard College seriously apprehended a retaliatory attack by the Catholics upon the college buildings, and particularly upon the library, then kept in Harvard Hall. The students were absent upon their vacation; and Rev. Mr. Palfrey, Dean of the Divinity Faculty, undertook to collect a volunteer guard among the recent graduates. One of seventy men was gathered for one night, commanded by Franklin Dexter; and another of like number for the next night, commanded by David Lee Child and George W. Phillips,—and the two guards alternated. Sumner was a private in the second guard; and, armed with a musket, left his father's house at evening to do duty at Cambridge, while the alarm lasted. The story is told of him, that
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 8: early professional life.—September, 1834, to December, 1837.—Age, 23-26. (search)
, Vol. XLVI. pp. 106-126. In sending the article to the editor, Dr. Palfrey, he wrote, Nov. 25, 1837, The whole has been written in the looporth American, you know, has passed from Alexander H. Everett to Dr. Palfrey, who is pushing it pretty hard, and, I think, may revive it. Hisere delighted with it. Yours ever, Chas. Sumner. To Rev. Dr. John G. Palfrey, Dr. Palfrey was born in 1796, and is still a resident Dr. Palfrey was born in 1796, and is still a resident of Cambridge. He was professor of sacred literature in Harvard University, 1831-39; and a member of Congress, 1847-49. among his various coegan his first political speech, Nov. 4, 1845, with a tribute to Dr. Palfrey for his manumission of inherited slaves,—the legal details of wha visit to the West Indies. All your friends here are well. Dr. Palfrey is well; and Judge Story as ever is in an overflow of spirits. ) for Cambridge. Ever yours affectionately, C. S. To Rev. Dr. John G. Palfrey. Dane Law College, Feb. 3, 1837. my dear Sir,—. . . I
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
gainst the college and the present order of things,—where are they? And what are you about? Do keep me informed of all that you do. I hope to return home and resume the threads of society and friendship and business, losing nothing in the way of either by my absence; and I must rely upon my friends keeping me informed of what passes. What has become of Hillard? He is alive and well I trust? And the North American Review, I hope it thrives. I wish you would be kind enough to say to Dr. Palfrey that I shall write him on the different points of his letter as soon as possible. And Mr. Sparks, how is he? Remember me to him and all friends, not omitting Felton, to whom I send all possible felicitations. Can I do any thing for you here? I shall see Bentley about your books. Write soon, and believe me as ever your sincere friend. Chas. Sumner. P. S. As I fold this, it occurs to me that it will reach you in vacation. A happy vacation to you with all my heart! To Judge S
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
r in Parliament, but he was a man of sterling worth and attractive personal qualities. He was a bencher of the Inner Temple, and had chambers in King's Bench Walk. In politics he was a moderate liberal. When he withdrew from public life, his neighbors and constituents gave him a testimonial in the form of an infirmary erected by public subscription in his honor. He delighted in hospitality, and was very cordial to visitors from this country, several of whom—Rev. Dr. Francis Wayland, Rev. Dr. Palfrey, Mr. Hillard, and Richard H. Dana, Jr.—were commended to him by Sumner, his first American guest. Mr. Ingham died Oct. 21, 1875, at the age of eighty-two. Tributes to his memory were published in the Boston Advertiser, Nov. 8 and 19, 1875,—one by Clement H. Hill, and the other by Mr. Hillard. Sumner visited Mr. Ingham at Westoe, in October, 1857, and made the memorandum at the time, Rambled about, hoping to recognize old spots which I had known nineteen years ago. the M. P. for South<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
a renewal at some future day. Then we shall have the extra pleasure of hearing your feats of valor and adventure. Your anticipations, you say, great as they were, were fully realized on landing in France. I think you peculiarly fitted to enjoy travelling. All is novelty and freshness, and with your energy, ardor, and untiring perseverance no information will be left vnattained, and no rational pleasure unsought. You have my best wishes that nothing may occur to mar this enjoyment. Dr. Palfrey wrote, Sept. 25:— You are, I will not say an enviable, but certainly a very fortunate, man; and are thus another illustration of the connection between good luck and good conduct. Governor Everett wrote, May 20, 1839:— I rejoice, my dear Sir, to hear from all quarters, public and private, of your great success abroad. I consider the country as under obligations to you for the favorable impression of our means of education and our institutions generally, which must be prod
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
. &c.: but my visit was quite hurried, as I was obliged by my engagements to hasten back to town. We have heard of the dreadful loss of the packets. I had written several letters, which were on board those ill-fated ships, and which will perhaps never reach their destination. To you I had written a very long letter,—partly dated, I think, from Milton Park, Letter not lost, ante, Vol. II. p. 31. and giving an account of my adventures in fox-hunting with Lord Fitzwilliam; one also to Dr. Palfrey, enclosing a letter interesting to him, which I received from Sir David Brewster; others to Longfellow, to Cleveland, to Mrs. Ticknor, to Mr. Fletcher, and to my mother. I wish you would do me the favor to let me know the fate of these letters. The article on Horace, in the last number but one of the Quarterly Review, Oct. 1838, Vol. LXII. pp. 287-332, Life and Writings of Horace. The article, enlarged and revised, became the Life of Horace, prefixed to Milman's exquisite edition
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
. &c.: but my visit was quite hurried, as I was obliged by my engagements to hasten back to town. We have heard of the dreadful loss of the packets. I had written several letters, which were on board those ill-fated ships, and which will perhaps never reach their destination. To you I had written a very long letter,—partly dated, I think, from Milton Park, Letter not lost, ante, Vol. II. p. 31. and giving an account of my adventures in fox-hunting with Lord Fitzwilliam; one also to Dr. Palfrey, enclosing a letter interesting to him, which I received from Sir David Brewster; others to Longfellow, to Cleveland, to Mrs. Ticknor, to Mr. Fletcher, and to my mother. I wish you would do me the favor to let me know the fate of these letters. The article on Horace, in the last number but one of the Quarterly Review, Oct. 1838, Vol. LXII. pp. 287-332, Life and Writings of Horace. The article, enlarged and revised, became the Life of Horace, prefixed to Milman's exquisite edition
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