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The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 286 4 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 135 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 85 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 71 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 33 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 2 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 29 1 Browse Search
Adam Badeau, Military history of Ulysses S. Grant from April 1861 to April 1865. Volume 1 25 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 20 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2 18 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at New Madrid (Island number10), Fort Pillow, and Memphis. (search)
th: 43d Ohio, Lieut.-Col. Wager Swayne; 63d Ohio, Col. John W. Sprague. Brigade loss: w, 5. Second division, Brig.-Gen. Schuyler Hamilton. First Brigade, Col. W. H. Worthington: 59th Ind., Col. J. I. Alexander; 5th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. Charles L. Matthies. Brigade loss: k, 2; w, 4 = 6. Second Brigade, Col. Nicholas Perezel: 10th Iowa, Lieut.-Col. William E. Small; 26th Mo., Col. George B. Boomer. Artillery: 11th Ohio Battery, Capt. Frank C. Sands. Loss: k, 1. Third division, Brig.-Gen. John M. Palmer. First Brigade, Col. James R. Slack: 34th Ind., Col. Townsend Ryan; 47th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Milton S. Robinson. Second Brigade, Col. Graham N. Fitch: 43d Ind., Col. William E. McLean; 46th Ind., Lieut.-Col. Newton G. Scott. Cavalry: 7th Ill., Col. Wm. P. Kellogg. Loss: w, 1; m, 2 = 3. Artillery: G, 1st Mo., Capt. Henry Hescock. Fourth division, Brig.-Gen. E. A. Paine. First Brigade, Col. James D. Morgan: 10th Ill., Lieut.-Col. John Tillson; 16th Ill., Col. Robert F. Smith. Brig
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Appointed Colonel of the 21st Illinois-Personnel of the regiment-general Logan-March to Missouri-movement against Harris at Florida, Mo. --General Pope in command-stationed at Mexico, Mo. (search)
ned and ran away. I took my regiment to Palmyra and remained there for a few days, until relieved by the 19th Illinois infantry. From Palmyra I proceeded to Salt River, the railroad bridge over which had been destroyed by the enemy. Colonel John M. Palmer at that time commanded the 13th Illinois, which was acting as a guard to workmen who were engaged in rebuilding this bridge. Palmer was my senior and commanded the two regiments as long as we remained together. The bridge was finished iPalmer was my senior and commanded the two regiments as long as we remained together. The bridge was finished in about two weeks, and I received orders to move against Colonel Thomas Harris, who was said to be encamped at the little town of Florida, some twenty-five miles south of where we then were. At the time of which I now write we had no transportation and the country about Salt River was sparsely settled, so that it took some days to collect teams and drivers enough to move the camp and garrison equipage of a regiment nearly a thousand strong, together with a week's supply of provision and some
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Third joint debate, at Jonesboro, September 15, 1858. (search)
that that Convention passed a resolution unanimously declaring that Abraham Lincoln was the first, last and only choice of the Republicans for United States Senator. He was not willing to have it understood that he was merely their first choice, or their last choice, but their only choice. The Black Republican party had nobody else. Browning was nowhere ; Gov. Bissell was of no account ; Archie Williams was not to be taken into consideration ; John Wentworth was not worth mentioning; John M. Palmer was degraded; and their party presented the extraordinary spectacle of having but one--the first, the last, and only choice for the Senate. Suppose that Lincoln should die, what a horrible condition the Republican party would be in! They would have nobody left. They have no other choice, and it was necessary for them to put themselves before the world in this ludicrous, ridiculous attitude of having no other choice in order to quiet Lincoln's suspicions, and assure him that he was not
Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. Douglas, Debates of Lincoln and Douglas: Carefully Prepared by the Reporters of Each Party at the times of their Delivery., Fourth joint debate, at Charleston, September 18, 1858. (search)
any Convention, to nominate a candidate for United States Senator. Probably this was the first time that such a thing was ever done. The Black Republican Convention had not been called for that purpose, but to nominate a State ticket, and every man was surprised and many disgusted when Lincoln was nominated. Archie Williams thought he was entitled to it, Browning knew that he deserved it, Wentworth was certain that he would get it, Peck had hopes, Judd felt sure that, he was the man, and Palmer had claims and had made arrangements to secure it ; but to their utter amazement, Lincoln was nominated by the Convention, and not only that, but he received the nomination unanimously, by a resolution declaring that Abraham Lincoln was the first, last, and only choice of the Republican party. How did this occur? Why, because they could not get Lincoln's friends to make another bargain with rogues, unless the whole party would come up as one man and pledge their honor that they would stand
of this law aroused everywhere over the Union is a matter of general history. It stirred up in New England the latent hostility to the aggression of slavery; it stimulated to extraordinary endeavors the derided Abolitionists, arming them with new weapons; it sounded the death-knell of the gallant old Whig party; it drove together strange, discordant elements it readiness to fight a common enemy; it brought to the forefront a leader in the person of Lincoln. The revolt of Cook, Judd, and Palmer, all young and progressive, from the Democratic majority in the Legislature was the first sign of discontent in Illinois. The rude and partly hostile reception of Douglas, on his arrival in Chicago, did not in any degree tend to allay the feeling of disapproval so general in its manifestation. The warriors, young and old, removed their armor from the walls, and began preparations for the impending conflict. Lincoln had made a few speeches in aid of Scott during the campaign of 1852, but
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 3 (search)
(30th), and action near Newnan (30th). Garrard's raid to South River, with skirmishes at Snapfinger Creek (27th), Flat Rock Bridge and Lithonia (28th). July 27-Aug. 6, 1864.Stoneman's raid to Macon, with combats at Macon and Clinton (July 30), Hillsborough (July 30-31), Mulberry Creek and Jug Tavern (August 3). July 30, 1864.Maj. Gen. Henry W. Slocum, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Twentieth Army Corps. Aug. 7, 1864.Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, succeeds Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer in temporary command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 9, 1864.Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, assigned to the command of the Fourteenth Army Corps. Aug. 10-Sept. 9, 1864.Wheeler's raid to North Georgia and East Tennessee, with combats at Dalton (August 14-15) and other points. Aug. 15, 1864.Skirmishes at Sandtown and Fairburn. Aug. 18-22, 1864.Kilpatrick's raid from Sandtown to Lovejoy's Station, with combats at Camp Creek (18th), Red Oak (19th), Flint River
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), Reports etc., of this campaign (search)
. 80Capt. George W. Spencer, Battery M, First Illinois Light Artillery. No. 81Lieut. Lyman A. White, Bridges' Illinois Battery. No. 82Lieut. George H. Briggs, Fifth Indiana Battery. No. 83Capt. Wilbur F. Goodspeed, Battery A, First Ohio Light Artillery. No. 84Capt. Frederick Schultz, Battery M, First Ohio Light Artillery, of operations June 24-September 8. No. 85Capt. Cullen Bradley, Sixth Ohio Battery. No. 86Capt. Jacob Ziegler, Battery B, Pennsylvania Light Artillery. No. 87Maj. Gen. John M. Palmer, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations May 30, and itinerary of the corps May 6-September 8. No. 88Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 7. No. 89Bvt. Maj. Gen. Jefferson C. Davis, U. S. Army, commanding Fourteenth Army Corps, of operations August 22-September 8. No. 90Brig. Gen. Richard W. Johnson, U. S. Army, commanding First Division, of operations May 3-June 13 and July 13-August 7. No. 91Brig.
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 5 (search)
al McPherson, and to follow with another corps (the Fourteenth, General Palmer's), leaving General Howard with the Fourth Corps to continue to its right and front, General Howard on its left and front, and General Palmer between it and the railroad. During a sharp cannonading from G Hooker's corps, next south, and General Johnson's division, of General Palmer's corps. The blow was sudden and somewhat unexpected, but Gene22d, I had the night before ordered General Davis' division, of General Palmer's corps, which by the movement of the Army of the Tennessee haded to shift General Schofield to that flank also, and afterward General Palmer's corps, of General Thomas' army. General Schofield moved from the left on the 1st of August, and General Palmer's corps followed at once, taking a line below Utoy Creek, and General Schofield prolonged ievolved upon General A. S. Williams, who handled it admirably. General Palmer also resigned the command of the Fourteenth Corps, and General
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 11 (search)
icketing toward Tunnel Hill, and patrolling on Palmer's right flank; Garrard's division was detachedrt of McPherson's troops, threatening Resaca. Palmer's corps moved out of Snake Creek Gap two milesion, of Hooker's corps, moved up in support of Palmer's right. About noon of the 14th Schofield's and Palmer's corps attacked the enemy's position on the hills bordering the railroad, meeting witht from the center of my line by the advance of Palmer and Howard. About 11 a. m. General Butterfielnd halted for the night. Baird's division, of Palmer's corps, was posted on the right of Howard's ccommands of Major-Generals Hooker, Howard, and Palmer camped on the south side of Euharlee Creek, inom the Army of the Tennessee), was sent by General Palmer to move on Dallas by the most direct road ntieth) on the right, with Davis' division, of Palmer's corps, still on his right, but acting as a shofield's command, with Johnson's division, of Palmer's corps, on the left of Wood; Stoneman's divis[9 more...]
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 15 (search)
take the enemy in flank, if possible, while Major-General Palmer with the Fourteenth Corps threatened him in tillery upon our advance, and also upon that of General Palmer in his direct front. We soon ascertained that ch a way as to hold Tunnel Hill in conjunction with Palmer's corps on my right. The enemy occupied a strons position, with General Hooker on the left and General Palmer on the right, continuous skirmishing and artillhe order of march for the day. When it appeared General Palmer formed his line facing southward toward Pine Ton and good works were constructed. June 11, General Palmer's corps gained a little ground to his left and eral Newton's division, having been relieved by General Palmer, was moved to the right of General Wood's, relit near the left of General Stanley's division. General Palmer, with his column on my right, was directed to cto bring a heavy fire on the points of attack. General Palmer's arrangements were made simultaneous with mine
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