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Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill), Student life at Radcliffe. (search)
the more serious side of life. The last club to be especially mentioned, but not the least in the hearts of its faithful members, is the Philosophy Club. The Philosophy Club, varying from the custom of other clubs, meets at the homes of its members and friends, and spends much time in discussing all things knowable and unknowable. Usually discussion is begun by one member addressing the club. We have had, however, the good fortune of addresses from Professor Royce, Dr. Santayana and Mr. Parker. Open meetings, too, the Philosophy Club has held at Fay House. One season Professor Ladd spoke to us and Miss Thompson has given the club and its friends a paper on Fichte. That the Philosophy Club may have a long and prosperous life, that the members may soon solve the problem of the universe, is the wish of all who know its real helpfulness as well as its charm. Besides all these discussions, the out-doors of Cambridge lies, an open book before the students, longing perhaps for fre
William Swinton, Campaigns of the Army of the Potomac, chapter 11 (search)
pening of the battle of the Wilderness took shape from Warren's movements, it will be necessary to describe these in detail. The proximity of the Confederates, the position of whose advance has been indicated above, was not at all known. This ignorance of the enemy's position was partly due to the fact that Wilson's division of cavalry, which had, on the afternoon of the 4th, moved out on the turnpike nearly to Robertson's Tavern, was withdrawn that evening, and proceeded on a scout to Parker's store on the plankroad. Therefore no feelers were out on the route by which Ewell was advancing. But to guard against any approach by the Orange turnpike, Warren threw out the division of Griffin on that road to guard against any irruption of the enemy into the route upon which Sedgwick's corps, which followed the Fifth, was yet to move from Germanna Ford; while he set the van of his column, composed of the division of Crawford, in motion by a wood road to gain Parker's Store. Now Ewel
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Life of George Ticknor. (search)
h him. Their home was in Portsmouth, N. H. There I found, generally, Mr. Samuel Dexter, the eminent lawyer, and Chief Justice Parker, both of them Mr. Buckminster's parishioners. The conversation was mostly theological and political. Mr. Buckminyears old. He had the care of Mr. Buckminster's papers, after his death. Mr. Samuel Dexter, the distinguished lawyer, Judge Parker, of the Supreme Court of Massachusetts,—members of Mr. Buckminster's congregation,—and Mr. Ticknor, met early every moas done more silently than usual, no allusion was made to public affairs, and, when they left the house, Mr. Dexter and Mr. Parker bowed, and turned in opposite directions. Mr. Ticknor locked the door,—and the pleasant walks were given up. It waicknor went to Europe. In consultation with him, it was settled, that, after he had advised with Dr. Gardiner, Chief Justice Parker, and other friends, I should go to Europe, and study for two or three years. I therefore gave up my office, and tu<
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 6: (search)
ng Americans. The remainder of his residence in Paris he gave to a careful study of the public places and institutions of the city, writing elaborate and historical notes on what he saw. In August, he made two visits at Draveil, the chateau of Mr. Parker, an American gentleman, who had lived in France for thirty years. Journal. It is a fine establishment, worthy of an English nobleman from its magnitude, its completeness, and its hospitality. Several persons who interested or amused me wor were such as would have justified any general oppressions and cruelty, though I think hardly such special instances of inhumanity as I have heard of. To Mrs. Walter Channing. Paris, August 1, 1817. . . . . I have been above a week at Mr. Parker's, at Draveil, about twelve miles from Paris, a superb establishment, whose completeness splendor, and hospitality, equally struck me. Several persons were staying there at the same time that I was, and among them two French ladies remarkably w
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 17: (search)
ten days he was with us. What pleased him most, I suspect, was the Phi Beta Phi Beta Kappa Society of Harvard College. dinner. All the old members attended it on his account, so that nearly a hundred sat down to table, among whom were Chief Justice Parker, Judge Davis, Judge Story, Mr. Prescott, Sen., Mr. Webster, etc. The whole was carried through, with extemporaneous spirit, in the finest style, and nothing faltered, up to the last moment. The best toasts we ever had in this part of the country were given, on requisition from the chair, at an instant's warning, and the succession was uninterrupted. Judge Parker gave, The happy climate of New York, where the moral sensibilities and intellectual energies are preserved long after constitutional decay has taken place; and Judge Story gave, The State of New York, where the law of the land has been so ably administered that it has become the land of the law; to which the Chancellor instantly replied, The State of Massachusetts, th
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 21: (search)
a party collected to meet us at Mrs. Lister's. Mrs. Thomas Lister,—afterwards Lady Theresa,—sister to Lord Clarendon. After Mr. Lister's death she became, in 1844, the wife of Sir George Cornewall Lewis; and, beside her novel Dacre,—reprinted in America before 1835,—she published, in 1852, the Lives of Friends and Contemporaries of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Her beauty was celebrated. Mr. Lister was the author of Granby, Herbert Lacy, etc., and of a life of Lord Chancellor Clarendon. Mr. Parker was there, whom I saw in Boston a year ago, and who has lately carried a contested election against Lord John Russell;. . . . Lord and Lady Morley, fine old people of the best school of English character; the beautiful and unpretending Lady James Graham;. . . . Senior, the political economist; Babbage, the inventor of the great calculating machine, etc. . . . . We went at ten and came home at midnight, having enjoyed ourselves a good deal; for they were all, as far as I talked with them,
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 26 (search)
and note, 267. Palmerston, Viscount, 458. Paris, visits, 126-151; police affairs with, 141-146; visits, 253-263; salons, 253. Parish, Daniel, 15, 16, 27. Parker, Chief Justice of Massachusetts, 9, 10 note, 11, 340. Parker, Mr., 146, 148. Parker, Mr., 407. Park Street, house in, 387-389. Parr, Dr., 50, 52, 53, 288,Parker, Mr., 146, 148. Parker, Mr., 407. Park Street, house in, 387-389. Parr, Dr., 50, 52, 53, 288, 289. Parry, Captain, 422. Parsons, Chief Justice, 396. Parsons, William, 331, 332. Pastoret, Count, 253, 255, 256. Pastoret, Countess, 255, 256. Patterson, Mr., 193 note. Peabody, Rev. W. O. B., 428 and note. Peel, Sir, Robert, 416, 417, 480. Pellico, Silvio, 450. Pepperell, 337, 385. Perkins, Colonel T. H., 328Parker, Mr., 407. Park Street, house in, 387-389. Parr, Dr., 50, 52, 53, 288, 289. Parry, Captain, 422. Parsons, Chief Justice, 396. Parsons, William, 331, 332. Pastoret, Count, 253, 255, 256. Pastoret, Countess, 255, 256. Patterson, Mr., 193 note. Peabody, Rev. W. O. B., 428 and note. Peel, Sir, Robert, 416, 417, 480. Pellico, Silvio, 450. Pepperell, 337, 385. Perkins, Colonel T. H., 328, 370. Perkins, James, 370. Perkins, Mrs. S. G., 13, 49, 68, 260, 328, 331. Perkins, S. G., 12, 13, 14, 49, 68. Perkins, S. H., 68 and note, 121. Peter, America Pinkney, 38. Peter, Britannia Wellington, 38. Peter, Columbia Washington, 38. Peter, Mrs. See Custis. Peter, Thomas, 38. Petrarch, letter on, 341-344. Ph
le. He ordered Hill forward at the same hour, and himself promptly rode to the front, along the plank road, and was with the pickets when the skirmish opened, at Parker's store, on that road, at the head of the Wilderness run, three miles south of the old Wilderness tavern, where Grant and Meade, accompanied by Assistant Secretars run and fronting its wooded western watershed, which covered the deployment of Ewell and Hill. Lee, Stuart and Hill, riding to near the pickets in advance of Parker's store, had halted to look down the open valley of Wilderness run, at the long lines of Federals drawn up in battle array, when Meade's skirmishers suddenly adva march on the morning of the 5th, expected his army to traverse, having already ordered Hancock to Shady Grove church, on the headwaters of the Po, and Warren to Parker's store, in the same general direction, and Sedgwick to close up at the Wilderness tavern. Hancock, obeying his orders, had reached Todd's tavern, on the Brock r
of march, at dark, along the new military road toward Spottsylvania Court House, be followed by Ewell withdrawing by Hill's rear, while the latter remained guarding the rear of the army. Anderson with the First corps, which, in Longstreet's absence, he now commanded, marched at 1p. m., and, before daylight of the 8th, rested in a grove near Spottsylvania Court House, forming a strong support to the cavalry that was keeping back Grant's new advance. Ewell was held at the plank road, near Parker's store, until the early morning of the 8th, when the Second corps, with the exception of Early's division, which was left near Todd's tavern in support of Hill, marched to a junction with the First corps near Spottsylvania Court House. Grant, in person, tarried with Hancock until noon, after sending minute instructions to his advance for marching beyond Spottsylvania Court House toward Richmond and Butler; but learning, soon after, that Warren had met with a severe check on the highway to
James Russell Soley, Professor U. S. Navy, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, The blockade and the cruisers (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: (search)
ter Ward's death, Commander Craven succeeded to the command of the flotilla. Occasional brushes with the enemy took place, schooners were cut out or burned, and the river was kept open until the end of October, when the heavy batteries thrown up on the Virginia shore made it impassable. Early in 1862 the Confederates withdrew from their positions along the river. The work of the flotilla in the Potomac during the remainder of the war, under its successive commanders, Wyman, Harwood, and Parker, was chiefly confined to the suppression of the small attempts at illicit traffic which are always found along a frontier of belligerent operations. In the other Virginian rivers the flotilla at the same time took part in active operations, in connection with the movements of the army and the protection of transports and supplies. Outside the Chesapeake the real blockade service began. A little to the south of the Capes is found the double coast which extends as far as Wilmington. The
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