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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 84 2 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 48 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 44 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 41 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 33 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 26 0 Browse Search
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 8 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 5 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Incidents of the first Bull Run. (search)
y house.-editors. turnpike, so long as Bee, Bartow, Evans, and Wheat were on that side, we firing over their heads; and about 11 o'clock two brass 12-pounder Napoleons from the New Orleans Washington Artillery unlimbered on our right, retiring, however, after a few rounds. We were hardly more than fairly engaged with Ricketts when Griffin's splendid battery came to his aid, and took position full five hundred yards nearer to us, in a field on the left of the Sudley road. Ricketts had 6 Parrott guns, and Griffin had as many more, and, I think, 2 12-pounder howitzers besides. These last hurt us more than all the rifles of both batteries, since the shot and shell of the rifles, striking the ground at any angle over 15 or 20 degrees, almost without exception bored their way in several feet and did no harm. It is no exaggeration to say that hundreds of shells from these fine rifle-guns exploded in front of and around my battery on that day, but so deep in the ground that the fragmen
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
-boat Bienville, Commander Charles Steedman, followed by the Seneca, Lieutenant Commanding Daniel Ammen; gun-boat Curlew, Lieutenant Commanding P. G. Watmough; gun-boat Penguin, Lieutenant Commanding T. A. Budd; and the gun-boat Augusta, Commander E. G. Parrott. The plan of attack was to pass up midway between Forts Walker and Beauregard, receiving and returning the fire of both, to about two and one-half miles north of the forts, then to turn toward and close in with Fort Walker, encounterleet had passed into Port Royal Sound, and as the Wabash was turning to pass out, Tattnall's gun-boats were seen approaching from the mouth of Scull Creek. The Bienville was at once pointed in that direction, and opened fire from the 30-pounder Parrott on the forecastle. The gun-boats replied with an ineffectual fire at long range. None of the shots reached her. A brisk fire was kept up from the Parrott gun, and as the shells began to fall among the gun-boats they turned and stood up toward
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Port Royal, November 7th, 1861. (search)
12-pounders), Lieutenant R. H. Wyman; gun-boats Unadilla, Lieutenant Napoleon Collins; Seneca, Lieutenant Daniel Ammen; Ottawa, Lieutenant T. H. Stevens; Pembina, Lieutenant J. P. Bankhead (each of the four latter carried 1 11-inch, 1 20-pounder rifle, and 2 24-pounders); sailing sloop Vandalia (4 8-inch, 16 32-pounders, 1 12-pounder), Commander F. S. Haggerty; steamer Bienville (8 32--pounders, 1 30-pounder rifle), Commander Charles Steedman; Augusta (8 32-pounders, I 12-pounder), Commander E. G. Parrott; Curlew (6 32-pounders, 1 20-pounder rifle), Lieutenant P. G. Watmough; Penguin (4 32-pounders, 1 12-pounder), Lieutenant T. A. Budd; R. B. Forbes (2 32-pounders), Lieutenant H. S. Newcomb; Isaac Smith (8 8-inch, 1 30-pounder rifle, originally, but the broadside battery was thrown overboard on the way down from Hampton Roads), Lieutenant J. W. A. Nicholson. The loss in the Union fleet, as officially reported, was 8 killed, and 23 wounded. Total, 31. Union land forces, Brig.-Gen. T
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.59 (search)
as coming down from Norfolk. It did not take us long to find out, for we had not gone over two miles when we saw what to all appearances looked like the roof of a very big barn belching forth smoke as from a chimney on fire. We were all divided in opinion as to what was coming. The boatswain's mate was the first to make out the Confederate flag, and then we all guessed it was the Merrimac come at last. When we were satisfied it was the enemy, we went to quarters and fired our 30-pounder Parrott, which was not answered. We fired again, taking deliberate aim, and were rather surprised that it was unnoticed; we fired, I think, about six shots when our recall signal was hoisted on the Cumberland. By this time the batteries at Newport News had commenced firing, the Congress had gone to quarters and opened fire; when we got close to the Cumberland she also began firing. The Merrimac kept on until abreast the Congress, when she opened fire, pouring a broadside in passing, and came rig
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 1.7 (search)
. Wabash, Com. T. G. Corbin, 1 150-pounder Parrott, 1 10-inch, 1 30-pounder Parrott, 42 9-inch. Parrott, 42 9-inch. Screw-sloops. Pawnee, Com. G. B. Balch, 8 9-inch, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 1 50-pounder Dahlgre Capt. W. R. Taylor, 1 11-inch, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 3 30-pounder Parrotts, 4 32-pounders, 1 12-pis, 1 150-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 20-pounder Parrott pivot, 2 24-pounder S. B. howitzers, 112-pounCom. R. W. Scott, 11-inch pivot, 1 20-pounder Parrott pivot, 2 24-pounder S. B. howitzers; Ottawa, .-Com. W. D. Whiting, 1 11-inch, 1 20-pounder Parrott, 2 24-pounder howitzers; Water Witch, Lieut.-s; Conemaugh, Com. Reed Werden, 1 100-pounder Parrott pivot, 4 9-inch, 2 24-pounder S. B. howitzers. George Bacon, 1 9-inch pivot, 1 100-pounder Parrott, 2 50-pounder ]Dahlgren rifles, 2 24-pounder hur, 1 30-pounder Parrott pivot, 1 20-pounder Parrott pivot, 2 12-pounder heavy howitzers; Stettin,r William Watson, 4 32-pounders, 1 20-pounder Parrott; Memphis, Lieut.-Com. P. G. Watmough, Act. Ma[30 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The army before Charleston in 1863. (search)
mile and more. [See Vol. II., p. 9.] But the fact that we could throw heavier metal and do heavier work now than we could then, promised success, and the placing of guns in position against Fort Sumter was promptly begun. For this purpose 16 Parrott rifles and two Whitworth rifles were placed in batteries at distances from Fort Sumter ranging from 3428 to 4290 yards. The slow, tedious, and hazardous labor of moving into position and mounting these heavy guns and their carriages could be pery's troops and batteries, gun-boats had been built and were then building along its water front, and the avenue of escape for non-combatants was open and undisputed. The demand being refused [see p. 17], the marsh battery, containing one 8-inch Parrott rifle, previously referred to as the Swamp Angel, opened fire on the night of August 21st. The gun burst on the second night at the thirty-sixth round. Some of the projectiles reached a distance of about five and three-quarter miles. Firing o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The opposing forces at Fort Fisher, N. C.: January 13-15, 1865. (search)
ides. First division, Commodore Henry K. Thatcher; Second division, Commodore Joseph Lanman; Third division, Commodore Jas. Findlay Schenck; Fourth division, Commodore S. W. Godon; iron-Clad division, Commodore Wm. Radford. Flag-ship. Malvern, Lieut. William B. Cushing (1st attack); Lieut. B. H. Porter (k), (2d attack). Iron-Clads. Canonicus, Lieut.-Com. George E. Belknap. Mahopac, Lieut.-Com. E. E. Potter (1st attack); Lieut.-Com. A. W. Weaver (2d attack). Monadnock, Com. E. G. Parrott. New Ironsides, Commo. William Radford. Saugus, Com. E. R. Colhoun. Screw frigates. Colorado, Commo. H. K. Thatcher. Minnesota, Commo. Joseph Lanman. Wabash, Capt. M. Smith. Side-wheel steamers (1st class). Powhatan, Commo. J. F. Schenck. Susquehanna, Commo. S. W. Godon. Screw sloops. Brooklyn, Capt. James Alden. Juniata, Capt. W. R. Taylor (1st attack); Lieut.-Com. T. S. Phelps (2d attack). Mohican, Com. D. Ammen. Shenandoah, Capt. D. B. Ridgely. Ticonderoga, Capt. C
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
on; sloop Seminole, Commander J. P. Gillis; sloop Pawnee, Lieutenant commanding T. H. Stevens; gunboat Pembina, Lieutenant commanding J. P. Bankhead; sailing sloop Vandalia, towed by the Isaac P. Smith, Lieutenant commanding J. W. A. Nicholson. The flanking squadron consisted of the gunboats Bienville, Commander Charles Steedman, leading; Seneca, Lieutenant commanding Daniel Ammen; Curlew, Lieutenant commanding P. G. Watmough; Penguin, Lieutenant commanding F. A. Budd; and Augusta, Commander E. G. Parrott. Fort Walker, Hilton head. That flotilla was then lying at a safe distance between Hilton Head and Paris Islands. The plan of attack was to pass up midway between Forts Walker and Beauregard (which were about two miles apart), receiving and returning the fire of both; and at the distance of two and a half miles northward of the latter, round by the west, and closing in with the former, attack it on its weakest flank, and enfilade its two water faces. Dupont's Report. Th
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 12: operations on the coasts of the Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico. (search)
y the work was carried on under the supervision of General Gillmore, who was in chief command, and on the 9th of April eleven batteries, containing an aggregate of thirty-six guns, were in Siege of Fort Pulaski. readiness to open fire on the fort. These were batteries Stanton and Grant, three 10-inch mortars each; Lyon and Lincoln, three columbiads each; Burnside, one heavy mortar; Sherman, three heavy mortars; Halleck, two heavy mortars; Scott, four columbiads; Sigel, five 30-pounder Parrott, and one 48-pounder James; McClellan, two 84-pounders and two 64-pounders James; Totten, four 10-inch siege mortars. Totten and McClellan were only 1,650 yards from the fort; Stanton was 8,400 yards distant. Each battery had a service magazine for two days supply of ammunition, and a depot powder magazine of 8,000 barrels capacity was constructed near the Martello tower, printed on page 125, which was the landing-place for all supplies on Tybee. On that day the commanding General issued mi
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 15: the Army of the Potomac on the Virginia Peninsula. (search)
eventh Indiana; and by midnight May 24. the extraordinary race for Winchester was won by Banks, who had made a masterly retreat with very little loss, and had concentrated his infantry and artillery there. Broadhead's cavalry first entered the city. The retreating troops found very little time for rest. The Confederates, composed entirely of Ewell's corps, were closing around them in vast numbers compared to their own. Banks's force was less than seven thousand effective men, with ten Parrott guns and a battery of 6-pounders, smooth-bore cannon. The Confederate force was full twenty thousand in number. The leaders of the latter felt confident that on the morrow they would see the capture or destruction of their opponents. Yet they did not idly revel in these pleasing anticipations. Like a vigilant soldier, as he was, Ewell, who bivouacked within a mile and a half of Winchester, began operations to that end before the dawn. The equally vigilant Banks Richard S. Ewell. was
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