Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for John M. Patton or search for John M. Patton in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of Jackson's infantry ( foot cavalry ). (search)
Reminiscences of Jackson's infantry ( foot cavalry ). By Colonel John M. Patton. At the banquet of the Army of Northern Virginia, October 29th, 1879, Colonel John M. Patton was called upon to respond to the following toast: The Infantry--Though often half fed and half clad, they did their whole duty. We can never forget their heroic tread on the march, their bravery in battle, and the wild yell of enthusiasm and devotion which often sent dismay to the lines of the enemy. He spoke aColonel John M. Patton was called upon to respond to the following toast: The Infantry--Though often half fed and half clad, they did their whole duty. We can never forget their heroic tread on the march, their bravery in battle, and the wild yell of enthusiasm and devotion which often sent dismay to the lines of the enemy. He spoke as follows: Mr. Chairman--It would be a vain and presumptuous task were I, on this occasion, to essay an eulogy on the half fed and half clad infantry of the Army of Northern Virginia. They have written their own eulogy in imperishable lines on every sod of every battlefield of Virginia. That eulogy has been heard in the princely halls of imperial courts, and it has been rehearsed with pride around the camp-fires of every army, great and small, through-out the world. It has been piped to t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The battle of Shiloh--report of L. D. Sandidge, Inspector-General, Louisiana division. (search)
igade (Ruggles'), and Withers' division on its right, forming Bragg's line, Bragg being in second line of battle; Polk's corps, composed of Breckinridge's and B. R. Johnson's brigades, in reserve to rear — B. R. Johnson's brigade leading. Such was the position, as indicated by map inclosed, on night of 4th April preceding the battle. About dark I returned from extreme left to Corinth road, rejoined you there, and we slept by slight camp-fire in the interval between Gibson's and Anderson's (Patton) brigades. In the conversation held with you then, I asked, as you were one of the council of war, what were the leading objective points to be considered, what the plan of action, &c. You stated that after some discussion and difference of opinion in the council, General Sidney Johnston intended trying to drive the Federal left back on its centre and right, thus doubling his army against Owl creek, away from the river and gunboats. I added that was contrary to the usual plan, which was to
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Second Manassas. (search)
destructive volley into the enemy's ranks on our left, and pushed forward to the charge. The valiant Patton led the heroic Seventh Virginia. Its list of casualties in officers and men gives proof they were where the battle raged fiercely. Colonel Patton, Lieutenant-Colonel Florence, Major Swindler, and Adjutant Patton all fell, severely wounded in this brilliant onset. The ever-ready First, as usual, did its work manfully. Major Clements, with the war-worn Eleventh, moved forward with veteAdjutant Patton all fell, severely wounded in this brilliant onset. The ever-ready First, as usual, did its work manfully. Major Clements, with the war-worn Eleventh, moved forward with veteran firmness. The Seventeenth, led by the ardent Lieutenant-Colonel Marye, advanced in perfect line. Just before reaching the battery Colonel Marye fell, wounded severely (leg since amputated), and, under the command of the intrepid Major Herbert, the regiment continued the charge. The charge was a success, the enemy was driven from his guns, his infantry supports scattered, and his battery taken. My line was now somewhat broken, owing to the impetuosity of the charge, and seeing the en