hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 14 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 26 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 12 0 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 8 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 7 1 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874. 4 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pearce or search for Pearce in all documents.

Your search returned 2 results in 2 document sections:

usion was made to the Senator from Kentucky, who had demanded the yeas and nays, and a small shot was fired toward him. Mr. President, said the ex-leader and candidate, rising with great assumption of calm dignity, the Senator from Massachusetts will of course do his duty as he understands it. I, sir, as a Senator from Kentucky, shall endeavor to do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into the House, found the seats as full as usual, and business proceeding; and so we adjourned to the cars, and soon whirled by our pickets, and passed the famous Junction, and the Relay House, and Federal Hill, and n
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Incidents of the retreat after the panic was stopped. (search)
usion was made to the Senator from Kentucky, who had demanded the yeas and nays, and a small shot was fired toward him. Mr. President, said the ex-leader and candidate, rising with great assumption of calm dignity, the Senator from Massachusetts will of course do his duty as he understands it. I, sir, as a Senator from Kentucky, shall endeavor to do mine. [Resumes his seat and the newspaper, which he turns over somewhat conspicuously toward the gentleman on the other side of the house. ] Pearce speaks, half-way, for Maryland. Mr. Clerk Forney presently calls the vote; Trumball, Sumner, Wilson, and others, responding an emphatic Ay; and the chairman remarks that the bill is passed --six Senators voting No. Mr. Tennessee Johnston then postponing his speech, we looked into the House, found the seats as full as usual, and business proceeding; and so we adjourned to the cars, and soon whirled by our pickets, and passed the famous Junction, and the Relay House, and Federal Hill, and n