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by a flannel shirt with many a rent, army pants and a jacket that had been gray, before mud and smoke had brought it near the unity of Joseph's best garment. I'd show well at the club-portrait of a gentleman? he added lightly. Pshaw! Look at me/ There's a boot for a junior assembly! Wouldn't that make a show on a waxed floor? and little Charley H. grinned all the way across his fresh, fair face, as he extended a foot protruding from what had been a boot. D-1 take your dress! Peel those onions, Charley! cried a baldheaded man from the fire--Don't your heart rise at the scent of this olla, my boy? Don't it bring back our dinners at the Spanish legation? Stay and dine with us — if Charley ever has those onions done-and you'll feast like a lord-mayor! By the way, last letters from home tell me that Miss Belle's engaged to John Smith. You remember her that night at Mrs. R.'s fancy ball? Wouldn't mind having a bottle of Mrs. R.'s sherry now to tone up these onions,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Johnsonville. (search)
nny, J. P.; Dodson, Andrew; Drawn, Chas.; Duffie, George; Fitzpatrick, Garrett; Gains, M. M.; Geice, Geo.; Griffin, T. G.; Haig, John; Hamilton, Sam.: Hammel, J. M.; Hanner, A.: Johnson, Tyler; Jones, Jerry; Lanier, Wm.; McBurney, W.; McGuire, Jas.; McKenney, G.; Miles, W. P.; Mitchell, J. N.; Moore, F. A.; Morrison, J. B.; Moss, John; McDonald, J. L.; Moran, Wm., wounded at Price's X roads, but refused to leave his gun, killed at blockhouse near Baker's, on N. and C. railroad; Nepper, J. C.; Peel, Thos.; Priddy, M. C.; Prout, Josh; Prout, George; Powell, George; Reed, R. D.; Robinson, George; Sanders, Jas. L.; Scott, G. H.; Scott, J. M.; Siegel, Chas.; Smith, S. F.; Skeggs, Eugene; Southerland, Wm.; Stucker, Wm. G.; Summer, T. R.; Temple, C. R.; Thornton, A. R.; Taylor, J. G.; Wermesdoff, J.; Weaver, A. B.; Williams, Phil.; Woods, James C.; Wilson, W. W.; Wilson, T. J. Absentees in hospital and on furlough not reported. Non-commission officers, artificers and teamsters all took
Man after man was shot down in the effort to bring them ammunition, but some escaped death at this work, defying a fire that cut down and hewed to splinters trees 22 inches in diameter. Courier A. W. Hancock and Private F. Dolan, of the Forty-eighth, were particularly distinguished in this service. The brigade lost some of its most valuable officers, including the gallant Colonel Baker, Lieut.-Col. A. M. Feltus, Adjt. D. B. L. Lowe and Ensign Mixon of the Sixteenth; Colonel Hardin and Adjutant Peel, of the Nineteenth; Captains McAfee, Davis and Reynhardt of the Forty-eighth, and Lieutenant Bew of the Twelfth. Maj. E. C. Councell (afterward promoted colonel and killed), Capt. Harry Smith and Private Edward Perault of the Sixteenth; Lieut.-Col. S. B. Thomas of the Twelfth, and Courier Charles Weil were mentioned for conspicuous bravery. Gen. Samuel McGowan, part of whose brigade got into a portion of the trenches, reported that his men found in the trenches General Harris and what r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.20 (search)
to every merchant in the land; but how few of them know and are grateful to the statesman who did most to give it a permanent place in our fiscal system! On the subject of the tariff, Mr. Hunter followed the teachings of Adam Smith, Ricardo, McCulloch and the great political economists of Europe, whose works have built up the doctrine of free exchange of products, upheld in this country by Jefferson, Calhoun, Silas Wright, and numbers of our greatest thinkers and patriots, and held abroad by Peel, Cobden, Bright, Bastiat and Gladstone. Alexandria Retrocession. In the same Congress he actively and most wisely promoted the retrocession of Alexandria to Virginia—a policy dear to every heart in the Commonwealth, and destined, as I hope, never to be surrendered at the bidding of alien speculators and jobbers. The long and dangerous contention with England over the Oregon boundary was also settled at this Congress by the wise and patriotic statesmanship of Webster, Calhoun and Benton
he rushed up to the gallery, and eagerly asked his friend Woodfall what he thought of it. That candid man shook his head and told him oratory was not his forte. Sheridan leaned his head on his hand a moment, and then exclaimed with vehement emphasis, 'It is in me, however, and, by Heaven. it shall come out. '" This reminds us of D'Israeli's failure, on first speaking in the House of Commons, and his energetic promise, "The time will come when you shall hear me,"--a promise well redeemed, as Peel and Palmerston, Bright and Gladstone, have had full opportunity of knowing. In a short time Sheridan acquired the necessary confidence for speaking well, and, in 1783 after he had been in office for a short time, he made the well known retort to the younger Pitt, which displayed both wit and readiness--two special creators of applause and power, in a popular assembly. The story, as told in "The Wits and Beaux of Society, " runs thus: Sheridan, from boyhood, had been taunted with be
ch up Cortiandt street was a continuation of the ovation so thoroughly begun in Jersey City. On the first of the escort arriving at the corner of the street where it connects with Broadway, the chimes of old Trinity pealed out its merry music. The following are the pieces played: "Changes on Eight Bells," "Yankee Doodle." "Hail Columbia," "Welcome Home," "Happy am I," "Auld Lang Syne," "America," "The Red, White and Blue," "Home, Sweet Home," "Yankee Doodle," "Changes on Eight Bells," "General Peel." At the Astor House the Regiment halted, and was drawn up in line to allow the escort of the Seventh Regiment Reserve Corps and the battalion of the Sickles Brigade to pass through. The front presented was magnificent, and the manŒuvres were applauded enthusiastically. Some of the volunteers stationed at the Park barracks congregated at the lower end of the Park and endeavored to deride the regiment by groaning, but all their efforts proved fruitless, as the assembly about the Ast
tant act of his administration had been the recognition of Louis Philippe, saluted king of the French, after the memorable days of July. In the ministry formed by Peel and Wellington, which endured only for the vacation of 1834- '35, Aberdeen held the appointment of colonial secretary. When Peel took office, in 1841, Aberdeen rePeel took office, in 1841, Aberdeen received again the portfolio of foreign-affairs, and appeared to have learned that history tendencies were to be repressed rather than indulged. He supported Peel in repealing the corn laws, and retired with him on the ministerial changes which succeeded the enactment of that policy. He has since occasionally spoken against the goPeel in repealing the corn laws, and retired with him on the ministerial changes which succeeded the enactment of that policy. He has since occasionally spoken against the government, particularly in the affairs of Greece. During the Cabinet crisis of 1851 he was sent for by the Queen, with a view to undertake the government with Sir John Graham, but declined that responsibility. He had previously refused to co-operate with Lord Stanley. In February, 1852, on the accession to power of the protectio
More Privateersmen captured. --From late Northern papers we learn the following: The brig Costa Rica, Captain Peel, from Aspinwall, arrived at New York on Saturday morning. She reports that on the 8th instant, off Cape Antonic, Jamaica, she spoke the brig Cuba, Captain J. D. Strout, from Port of Spain, Trinidad, for London. The captain of the Cuba reported that on the 4th instant, off the Isle of Pines, his vessel was boarded by the privateer Sumter, and the brig was declared a prize to the Confederate States of America. A prize crew of five men were put on board to take her to the nearest port. As soon as the Sumter was out of sight, Captain Stroud succeeded in disarming the prize crew, put them in irons, and the brig, with three of the prisoners, is now on her way to New York. Two of the privateer prisoners were transferred from the Cuba to the Costa Rica, and were brought to New York. The same papers also bring a statement of another recapture: New York, Jul
More Privatersmen captured. --From late Northern papers we learn the following: The brig Costa Rica, Captain Peel, from Aspinwall, arrived at New York on Saturday morning. She reports that on the 8th instant, off Caps Antonio, Jamaica, she spoke the brig Cuba, Captain J. D. Strout, from Port of Spain, Trinidad, for London. The captain of the Cuba reported that on the 4th instant, off the Isle of Pines, his vessel was boarded by the privateer Sumter, and the brig was declared a prize to the Confederate States of America. A prize crew of five men were put on board to take her to the nearest port. As soon as the Sumter was out of sight, Captain Stroud succeeded in disarming the prize crew, put them in irons, and the brig, with three of the prisoners, is now on her way to New York. Two of the privateer prisoners were transferred from the Cuba to the Costa Rica, and were brought to New York. The same papers also bring a statement of another recapture: New York, Ju
on, is handsomely exposed. "As well may a stoker limit his engine to an hundred weight of coals a day, and expect to get any speed out of it he pleased." The soldier requires more meat during labor than in idleness, in winter than in summer, in a cold climate than a hot. Salt meat is vastly less nutritious than fresh, and, in the failure of lemon juice, scurvy and its allied diseases are sure to follow its use. Not only should there be good food, but means of properly preparing it. Until Gen. Peel came into the British war office, when cooking-ranges and other appliances were by his direction introduced into several of the barracks, there was but one mode of preparing food recognized or provided for. There were coppers for boiling, but no meat could be baked, roasted, broiled, or stewed. Says Mr. Brown, the Surgeon Major of the Guards: "It is beef and buoilli one day, and bouilli and beef the next, for twenty-one years, The result is, that the soldier does not consume even th
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