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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenantling of bitterness against the Northern troops. Mr. Davis was a member of the wholesale firm of Pegram, Paynter & Davis, of Baltimore street. He was an Irishman by birth and had married in Virginia. nt left a wide interval between Cook's right and Battle's left, which was subsequently filled by Pegram's division. In the mean time, Grimes' brigade was recalled from the left and moved by the rightvest, among them Adjutant Winder Laird. September 30—We again encountered the enemy to-day at Pegram's farm, and after a desperate battle achieved a signal victory, but at a fearful cost, As usual,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
ng Messrs. Mason and Slidell to Europe. She was a side-wheel, brigrigged steamer, of about twelve or fourteen hundred tons, and was therefore deemed by them too large a vessel to run the blockade. That purpose was accordingly abandoned. Captain R. B. Pegram, then in command of the Nashville, fitted her with two small guns and made her ready for sea, with a full crew of officers and men. The following is a list of her officers: Captain, R. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; SeR. B. Pegram; First Lieutenant, Charles M. Fauntleroy; Second Lieutenant, John W. Bennett; Third Lieutenant, William C. Whittle; Master, John H. Ingram; Surgeon, John L. Ancrum; Paymaster, Richard Taylor; Chief Engineer, James Hood; Assistant Murray and two others, and the following midshipmen: W. R. Dalton, William H. Sinclair, Clarence Cary, J. W. Pegram, W. P. Hamilton, ——Thomas, and ——McClintock. On the night of October 21, 1861, she ran out of Charleston and touched at Bermuda. After stopping there a few days for coal, she headed across the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.29 (search)
orities of Baltimore. Nothing could exceed the courage and skill with which Marshal Kane met the emergency with the small force under his command. When the troops reached Camden Station 130 were missing. Robert W. Davis killed. The killing of Robert W. Davis, who was shot by the soldiers from the car windows, was an atrocious act, and tended more than any one incident to intensify the feeling of bitterness against the Northern troops. Mr. Davis was a member of the wholesale firm of Pegram, Paynter & Davis, of Baltimore street. He was an Irishman by birth and had married in Virginia. One of his brothers was an officer in the British Army. He was a gentleman of high character and great popularity. Upon the announcement of his death all the wholesale dry goods stores of the city closed in respect to his memory and in testimony of his worth. The Sun the next day in an editorial denounced the killing of Mr. Davis as a wanton and deliberate murder. The story of the event, as t
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
ve them in great confusion, but was himself seriously wounded while nobly leading his brigade, the command of which then devolved on Lieutenant-Colonel Hobson, Fifth Alabama. Cook and Cox continued to advance, swinging to the right, driving the enemy in their front, with but little resistance, for upward of half a mile. Cook captured several cannon, caissons, ammunition, wagons, etc. This movement left a wide interval between Cook's right and Battle's left, which was subsequently filled by Pegram's division. In the mean time, Grimes' brigade was recalled from the left and moved by the right flank through the abandoned camp of the Eighth corps, which had been completely routed; faced to the front and advanced to the pike, connecting with Battle's right. This projection was perfected about sunrise, the enemy being then in position on a small creek to the left of the pike, with their artillery on a high ridge in their rear, and firing into our line of battle, but the smoke and fog obs
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.50 (search)
Manassas, is given under the caption A Secret Service Episode,Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXVIII, pp. 14-18. Zimmer was entrusted by the Advisory Council of War, which in 1861 was composed of Governor John Letcher, Lieutenant-Governor Robert L. Montague (father of our present Executive); Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, State Senator Thomas S. Haymond (later of West Virginia), Colonel (later Major-General) Francis H. Smith, Superintendent Virginia Military Institute, Captain Robert B. Pegram, C. S. Navy, and perhaps others. The private secretary of Governor Letcher, Colonel S. Bassett French, acted as Secretary of the Board. Of the proceedings of this Board of War, so able in its constitutional personnel, and which would be so informatory as to early appointments, only those of the early months of 1861 are preserved in our State Library—a lamentable loss. Further, of the Executive Journal, which might assist in the want of the proceedings referred to, there is prese
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), War officers of the First regiment Virginia volunteer infantry, (search)
Manassas, is given under the caption A Secret Service Episode,Southern Historical Society Papers, Vol. XXVIII, pp. 14-18. Zimmer was entrusted by the Advisory Council of War, which in 1861 was composed of Governor John Letcher, Lieutenant-Governor Robert L. Montague (father of our present Executive); Commodore Matthew Fontaine Maury, State Senator Thomas S. Haymond (later of West Virginia), Colonel (later Major-General) Francis H. Smith, Superintendent Virginia Military Institute, Captain Robert B. Pegram, C. S. Navy, and perhaps others. The private secretary of Governor Letcher, Colonel S. Bassett French, acted as Secretary of the Board. Of the proceedings of this Board of War, so able in its constitutional personnel, and which would be so informatory as to early appointments, only those of the early months of 1861 are preserved in our State Library—a lamentable loss. Further, of the Executive Journal, which might assist in the want of the proceedings referred to, there is prese
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
ederate States prisoners under fire of own men at, 231. Nashville, Confederate States steamer, Cruise of, 207. Negro Troops in Federal army, 232. North Carolina Cavalry, 5th, Gallantry of,—Troops how armed, 144; Troops in Confederate States army, number of, 295. O'Conor, Hon., Charles, 55. Olds, Fred. A., 151. Ould, Hon., Robert, 126. Palmer, Colonel, Wm. H., 365. Peace Conference at Hampton Roads, 177; what instructions at, 192, 342. Pegram's Farm, Battle at. 289. Pegram, Captain, C S. Navy, 208 Peters, Lieutenant, Winfield, 138, 243. Pickett, Colonel John T, 342. Pleasants, James, Gallantry of, 223. Pope, General John, Cruelty of, 103. Prather, F. W. S., killed, 143 Price, General, Sterling, 213. Prisoners, Treatment of, 125, 229, 234. Pulaski, Fort, Escape of Lieutenant W. W. George from, 229; officers at, 234. Rayner, Hon Kenneth, 37. Randolph, General George W., 201. Reams' Station, Battle of. 289. Rehel, a term of honor, 130.