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ell's division, same corps, was entirely Mississippian, containing the Twenty-fourth regiment, Col. R. P. Mc-Kelvaine; Twenty-seventh, Col. Jas. A. Campbell; Twenty-ninth, Col. W. F. Brantly; Thirtieth, Col. Junius I. Scales; Thirty-fourth, Maj. W. J. Pegram. The artillery of Liddell's division was commanded by Capt. Charles Swett and included his battery, under Lieut. H. Shannon. Another Mississippi brigade was that commanded by Gen. Patton Anderson in Hindman's division, composed of the Sevl Morgan were severely wounded. Cheatham's division had meanwhile moved to the assistance of Cleburne, and now Walthall joined in the fight on the right of Jackson's brigade, still against Thomas. In the severe engagement Saturday afternoon, Major Pegram, of the Thirty-fourth, was severely wounded, and Captain Bowen assumed command. Major Staples, commanding the Twenty-fourth, was also severely wounded and Captain Smith slightly. Captain Turner commanded the next day. On the left of the a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
gfield. McIntosh's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel D. G. McIntosh. Johnson's Battery, Captain [V. J. Clutter.] Hardaway Artillery, Captain W. B. Hurt. Danville Artillery, Captain R. S. Rice. Second Rockbridge Artillery, Captain L. Donald. Richardson's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel C. Richardson. Lewis Artillery, Captain N. Penick. Donaldsonville Artillery, Captain V. Maurin. Norfolk Light Artillery, Captain C. R. Grandy. Huger Artillery, Captain J. D. Moore. Pegram's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel W. J. Pegram. Pee Dee Artillery, [Captain E. B. Brunson]. Fredericksburg Artillery, Captain E. A. Marye. Letcher Artillery, Captain T. A. Brander. Purcell Battery, [Captain Geo. M. Cayce]. Crenshaw's Battery, Captain T. Ellett. Poague's Battalion. Lieutenant-Colonel W. T. Poague. Madison Artillery, [Captain T. J. Richards]. Albemarle Artillery, Captain J. W. Wyatt. Brooke Artillery, Captain A. W. Utterback. Charlotte Artillery, Captain —– Willi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
James and Robert Ellett, Greenlee Davidson, John and Ellis Munford, Edward Maynee, Joseph McGraw, G. M. Cayce and a host of others who formed one of the grandest artillery battalions in the Army of Northern Virginia, and who have now passed away, it awakens the tenderest memories of the past. In July, 1887, the Pegram Battalion Association, composed of the surviving members of batteries everyone of which were attached to the brigades forming A. P. Hill's Light Division, and afterwards as Pegram's battalion attached to the same division, and to the Third Corps of the Army of Northern Virginia, feeling that it would be becoming and proper in their Association, in the absence of any other organization to take the lead, as well as to show their admiration and love for their old division and corps commander, to organize an association for the purpose of erecting a monument to his memory worthy of his gallantry and fame. From this movement the A. P. Hill Monument Association was formed,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Purcell battery from Richmond, Va. [from the Galveston, Texas, news, November, 1899.] (search)
I will give them a transfer to such other commands as they may select. He waited some time. Not a man stirred. Then, said he, let us have no more of this talk. A soldier should always seek the most desperate post that has to be filled. He was a shining example of the influence a good officer has over his men. I believe almost any set of men would have fought under W. J. Pegram. A. S. Drewry, Private Purcell Battery, Pegram's Battalion Artillery, Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia. I will give them a transfer to such other commands as they may select. He waited some time. Not a man stirred. Then, said he, let us have no more of this talk. A soldier should always seek the most desperate post that has to be filled. He was a shining example of the influence a good officer has over his men. I believe almost any set of men would have fought under W. J. Pegram. A. S. Drewry, Private Purcell Battery, Pegram's Battalion Artillery, Third Corps, Army of Northern Virginia.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.30 (search)
youngest officer of the rank in the Confederate States Army. Another youthful commander is in evidence, General William R. Johnson Pegram, whose signature was W. J. Pegram. He was born in Petersburg, Va., in 1841; grandson of General Wm. R. Johnson, the Napoleon of the turf, son of General James W. Pegram, and nephew of Colonel Geo. H. Pegram, the Confederate commander of the battle of Rich Mountain. W. J. Pegram left the study of law at the University of Virginia in April, 1861, and enlisted as a private in F Company, of Richmond, Va. Willie Pegram was of small stature and wore glasses, but he was every inch a soldier, and born to command. While in cPegram was of small stature and wore glasses, but he was every inch a soldier, and born to command. While in camp at Fredericksburg, Va., in May, 1861, he was elected a lieutenant of the Purcell Battery of Artillery, commanded by Captain R. Lindsay Walker (subsequently Brigadier-General), and distinguished himself by conspicious gallantry at Manassas, Cedar Run, Chancellorville and Gettysburg, attaining the rank of Lieutenant-Colonel of A
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Eleventh Kentucky Cavalry, C. S. A. From the Lexington, Ky. Herald, April 21, 1907. (search)
ch 7 Colonel Chenault, with a great part of his regiment, went to reinforce General Pegram at Beaver Creek, marching by way of Maynardsville and Racoon Valley; and onnvariably died. A case of recovery from it was unknown. About this time General Pegram made an unsuccessful raid into Central Kentucky, going as far as Danville. ault marched his regiment to the Cumberland River and protected the crossing of Pegram's fugitives. General Pegram never forgave Colonel Chenault for this kindness, General Pegram never forgave Colonel Chenault for this kindness, and from that date never lost an opportunity for annoying him. On April 18 the two companies of the Eleventh that had gone with Colonel Cluke on his raid in Easte, and await their movements. General, if possible, help us. On April 29 General Pegram reported to General Joe Wheeler that he had assumed command of the regimentt. Early this morning Colonel Morrison moved up from Albany to my relief, with Pegram's Brigade. They ambushed him, and have taken all his artillery except the two
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 35. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. (search)
The Warren Blues—Extra Billy's men: Roll of officers and men of a famous band of Veterans. Company roll of the officers and men of the Warren Blues, Company E, and afterwards Company D, of the 49th Virginia Infantry, Extra Billy Smith's Regiment, Pegram's Brigade, Early's Division, Stonewall Jackson Corps, Army of Northern Virginia: This company was mustered into service at Front Royal, Va., on the 17th day of June, 1861, with the four first commissioned officers, to-wit: Wheatley, Manley T., captain and promoted to major in October; died in December, 1861. Jacobs, Bayley S., first lieutenant and captain; was killed at Gettysburg. Updike, John B., second lieutenant and first lieutenant, captain; wounded at Spotsylvania, 12th of May, 1864, and retired. Funkhouser, Robert D., Jr., second lieutenant, first lieutenant, captain and acting lieutenant-colonel; wounded at Winchester, 19th of September, 1864, and captured at Fort Steadman, near Petersburg, 25th of March, 18
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book II:—--the Mississippi. (search)
nication of the Army of the Cumberland. General Pegram's troops, stationed in the south-eastern pu whence he had emerged. In the mean while, Pegram, who has gathered together the remainder of hiof cavalry under General Carter. The whole of Pegram's force, having once more got into the saddle,st, posted behind the Kentucky, he is watching Pegram's movements, the latter overruns the whole lefoded hill which stands crosswise of the road. Pegram, trusting in his numerical superiority—for he s hasty retreat upsets all the daring plans of Pegram. When Scott, sabring the stragglers and alreathe Federals. The latter have lost fifty men, Pegram about three hundred. Gillmore pursued him as e movement and to cross the river in search of Pegram in a locality where he believed himself perfecose of conquering East Tennessee. The bulk of Pegram's brigade, composed of four or five regiments der the command of Colonel Kautz, came up with Pegram's soldiers on the morning of the 9th, and drov[2 more...]
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book IV:—Third winter. (search)
n—an hour later the movement, in the distance, of the rear of the Federal Third corps. Early's division relieved on the preceding day that of Johnson. Although this change is definitive, they are not yet settled close to the river; Gordon's and Pegram's brigades have been placed on the west, that of Hoke on the east of Brandy Station; Hays alone occupies the works on the left bank of the Rappahannock with five Louisiana regiments and Green's battery, which has placed two guns in each small for bank. His own brigade occupies the two works on the right and the remainder of the defenses. He has kept as a reserve the Ninth Louisiana. His force consists of nearly two thousand two hundred men. Early soon after brings forward Gordon's and Pegram's brigades, and, leaving them on the right bank, goes to examine Hays' position. He finds it badly prepared for the defence. But Lee, who has just arrived, does not believe the Federals daring enough to attack it, and a garrison of two brigades
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), chapter 7 (search)
brigade Scales, 13th, 16th, 22d, 34th, 38th N. C. Artillery battalion, Major Poague, 4 batteries. 3d division, Major-general H. Heth. 1st brigade, Archer, 1st, 7th, 14th Tenn., 5th, 13th Batt. Ala. 2d brigade Pettigrew, 11th, 26th, 47th, 52d N. C. 3d brigade Brockenbrough, 40th, 47th, 55th, 22d Batt. Va. 4th brigade Davis, 2d, 11th, 26th, 42d Miss., 55th N. C. Artillery battalion, Lieutenant-colonel Garnett, 4 batteries. Corps artillery, Major McIntosh, McIntosh's and Pegram's battalions; 9 batteries. Cavalry division. Major-General J. E. B. Stuart. 1st brigade, Robertson, 4th, 5th, 59th, 63d N. C. 2d brigade W. Hampton, 1st N. C., 1st, 2d S. C., Cobb's, Davis', and Phillips' Legions. 3d brigade Fitzhugh Lee, 1st, 2d, 3d, 4th, 5th Va. 4th brigade W. H. F. Lee, 9th, 10th, 13th, 15th Va., 2d N C. 5th brigade Jones, 6th, 7th, 11th, 12th, 35th Batt. Va. 6th brigade Jenkins, 14th, 16th, 17th, 26th, 34th Batt. Va. Horse artillery, 7 batteries.
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