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Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 16 2 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 16 0 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 14 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 8 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, The new world and the new book 8 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 7. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Pelham or search for Pelham in all documents.

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ough these places, a distance from sixty-five to seventy miles, over a country destitute of forage, poorly supplied with water, by narrow and difficult wagon-roads. The main Cumberland Range could also have been passed, on an inferior road, by Pelham and Tracy City to Thurman. The most southerly route on which to move troops and transportation to the Tennessee, above Chattanooga, was by Cown, University, Battle Creek, and Jasper, or by Tantallon, Anderson, Stevenson, Bridgeport, and the mo completely available for transporting stores to Tracy City. The movement over the Cumberland Mountains began on the morning of the sixteenth of August, as follows: General Crittenden's corps in three columns, General Wood from Hillsboro by Pelham to Thurman, in Sequatchie Valley. General Palmer from Manchester by the most practicable route to Dunlop. General Van Cleve with two brigades from McMinnville, the third being left in garrison there, by the most practicable route to Pikevil