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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 49 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 20 0 Browse Search
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his infamous raid by other tory residents of Scott County, among whom was Riley Cecil, another individual who was released by Major Fulkerson, at Jamestown, last summer, upon making the strongest promises of good behavior toward the Confederate States. Those composing the little patriotic band, were R. Bird, Speed Faris, Samuel Freeman, J. W. Smith, Clint. Roe, Ples. Jones, Joe Cain, S. C. Cain, Wm. Ellison, Frank and Abel Bryant, G. W. Lyttle, S. Stanfield, Jeremiah Meadors, R. and J. Pemberton, and some others, making between twenty and thirty in number.--Frankfort Commonwealth (Ky.), Dec. 9. A party of Unionists attacked the Confederate pickets at Morristown, East Tennessee, killing a large number of them, and putting the rest to flight.--Memphis Avalanche, Dec. 2. Simon Cameron, the Secretary of War, in his report, proposed that the limits of Virginia be so altered, as to make her boundaries consist of the Blue Ridge on the east, and Pennsylvania on the north, leavi
the rebel force under General Bragg, which commenced two days previous, was resumed this morning, and, after a most obstinate and bloody contest, which lasted all day, resulted in the retreat of the rebel forces with great slaughter.--(Docs. 26 and 146.) Skirmishing continued yesterday around Vicksburgh, and this morning the rebels advanced upon a portion of General Grant's army who were engaged erecting works on the lake near the city, causing them to retreat with a slight loss. General Pemberton, in command of the rebels, sent a despatch to Richmond stating that the enemy finding all his efforts unavailing to make any inroad upon our position here, has reembarked, leaving a considerable quantity of intrenching tools and other property, and apparently has relinquished his designs upon Vicksburgh. President Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation was officially issued as General order no. 1. A detachment of Stuart's rebel cavalry, commanded by Major Herring, made a descent
ing twenty, and capturing forty-six prisoners, among whom were one major, two captains, and one lieutenant. He also seized twenty horses, and one wagon-load of arms. Dawson's party had been engaged for many weeks burning all the cotton that could be found in that part of the country. Captain Moore did not lose a man, and had only three wounded.--Wolverine Citizen. The English sloop Julia was captured near Jupiter Inlet, Fla.--General Mansfield Lovell was dismissed from the service of the rebels for incapacity.--The steamer Mussulman was burned by guerrillas at Bradley's Landing, ten miles above Memphis, Tenn.--General Pemberton, in command of the rebel forces at Vicksburgh, issued an order expressing his high appreciation of their recent gallant defence of that position.--The rebel steamer Tropic, formerly the Huntress, of Charleston, S. C., while attempting to run the blockade, was destroyed by fire. Her passengers were saved by the boats of the National gunboat Quaker City.
Edwards and Willis, the latter of the Third Georgia cavalry, and dangerously wounded.--Cincinnati Commercial. The battle of Champion Hill, or Baker's Creek, Miss., was fought by the Nationals, under General Grant, and the rebels, under General Pemberton, in which the latter was compelled to fall back behind the Big Black River.--(Doc. 192.) A reconnoitring party of the First New York mounted rifle regiment, under the command of Major Patton, were attacked in the vicinity of Suffolk, V Gulf of Mexico, off Mobile harbor, Ala.--Captain Walker's Report. At daylight this morning the National army, under General Grant, moved on from Champion Hill to the Big Black River, Miss., where a battle was fought with the rebels, under Pemberton, and they were again defeated and driven into their intrenchments around Vicksburgh with great loss of men and munitions of war.--(Doc. 193.) Jackson, Miss., was evacuated by the National forces, belonging to the army of General Grant.
At Vicksburgh, Miss., at eight o'clock this morning, flags of truce appeared before A. J. Smith's front, when the rebels, Major-General Bowen and Colonel Montgomery, were led blindfolded into the Union lines. They bore a communication from General Pemberton, of the following purport: Although I feel confident of my ability to resist your arms indefinitely, in order to stop the further effusion of blood, I propose that you appoint three commissioners, to meet three whom I shall select, tme time, myself and men, and officers of this army, are ready to testify to the distinguished gallantry with which the defence of Vicksburgh has been conducted. At eleven o'clock the messengers returned. This afternoon General Grant met General Pemberton between the lines, and after an hour's consultation settled the surrender of the place.--(Docs. 25, 36, and 146.) The National Guards, Colonel Wright commanding, composed of the most substantial citizens of Newbern, N. C., received the
of Wilmington, N. C., the evening previous.--the rebel steamer Beauregard, after attempting to run the blockade of Charleston, S. C., returned to Nassau, N. P.--Jefferson Davis, regarding the furloughs granted the paroled prisoners from Vicksburgh of too great duration in the present condition of the country, with the exception of those of men most distant from the camp of General Pemberton, at Demopolis, ordered that they be reduced, and an order to that effect was issued by General Pemberton.of Wilmington, N. C., the evening previous.--the rebel steamer Beauregard, after attempting to run the blockade of Charleston, S. C., returned to Nassau, N. P.--Jefferson Davis, regarding the furloughs granted the paroled prisoners from Vicksburgh of too great duration in the present condition of the country, with the exception of those of men most distant from the camp of General Pemberton, at Demopolis, ordered that they be reduced, and an order to that effect was issued by General Pemberton.
December 8. A brisk cannonade between Fort Moultrie and Battery Gregg, in Charleston harbor, was carried on this day. The firing on Fort Sumter was moderated.--in a speech before the rebel Congress, this day, Mr. Foote expressed great indignation at the course pursued by President Davis. When Pemberton dishonorably surrendered Vicksburgh to the enemy, the President made him his companion, and carried him to General Bragg's army, when, as he rode along, soldiers were heard to say: There goes the traitor who delivered us over at Vicksburgh. The President never visited the army without doing it injury; never yet that it was not followed by disaster. He was instrumental in the Gettysburgh affair. He instructed Bragg at Murfreesboro. He has opened Georgia to one hundred thousand of the enemy's troops, and laid South-Carolina liable to destruction. I charge him with having almost ruined the country, and will meet his champion anywhere to discuss it. Would to God he would never v
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 24: Second attack on Vicksburg, etc. (search)
y Springs with some sixty thousand men upon Granada. General Pemberton would naturally march from Vicksburg to stop Grant at could be thrown into Vicksburg from the south, and while Pemberton was thus absent with the greater part of his Army Shermannd there was little chance of Sherman's succeeding unless Pemberton had drawn off nearly all his forces to oppose Grant's advderable risk in leaving his base at Holly Springs to draw Pemberton from Vicksburg. Time was precious and Sherman had to act time he had appointed, merely with the design of drawing Pemberton from Vicksburg and thus helping Sherman in his attack on nt proposed to do, although it was suggested that in case Pemberton retreated before him, Grant would follow him up. Grantossible for Grant to continue his march on Granada, which Pemberton perceiving, the latter returned to Vicksburg in time to as behind time and the opportunity was lost. A portion of Pemberton's Army had returned from Granada, just in time to overwhe
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
g line of heavy batteries on the hills and at the water front, with 42,000 men in garrison under a very clever general (Pemberton), and Gen. J. E. Johnston with 40,000 more troops at Jackson (the capital of Mississippi), within easy distance of the s movement (which they did as soon as the levee was cut at Delta) they went to work and built the two formidable forts, Pemberton and Greenwood on the Tallahatchie and Yallabusha, and blocked the way effectually. General Pemberton showed a great General Pemberton showed a great deal of ability in his defense of Vicksburg, all through, and won the respect of his opponents by his zeal and fidelity to his cause, to say nothing of his spirit of endurance. But in nothing did he show more energy than in watching the Federal tacflanks, especially by way of the streams which would have commanded the approaches to Vicksburg if held by an enemy. Pemberton took care that these passes should never be left unguarded in the future. These attempts to turn his flanks sharpened
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 27: expedition through Steele's Bayou and Deer Creek. (search)
were all removed, and the fleet went on its way down rejoicing. Sherman had heard the firing, and had pushed on to get to the aid of the gun-boats. In the meantime, the enemy had landed more infantry — there were about four thousand in all. Pemberton, at Vicksburg, was well posted in all that was going on, and was determined to leave nothing undone to capture the venturesome fleet. Again the fleet came to a stand-still, but this time only two large trees had been felled. The crews of ththe obstacles in the way of getting into Vicksburg, kept the enemy continually on the alert, and obliged them to be moving through a country filled with all kinds of obstacles, and made them doubtful where the blow would fall. On this account, Pemberton had to reduce his Army in the city, and keep a larger portion of it at points remote from the real objective point at which the Union general aimed. The Confederate soldiers were worn out and dispirited by the numerous marches and countermar
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